1

This question already has an answer here:

I want to statically initialize a map<string, pair<some_enum, string> >. Let's say a map from employee id to job title (enum) + name.

I would love for it to look like this:

map<string, pair<some_enum, string> > = {
  { "1234a", { BOSS, "Alice" }},
  { "5678b", { SLAVE, "Bob" }},
  { "1111b", { IT_GUY, "Cathy" }},
};

What is the best way to do this in C++?

marked as duplicate by ecatmur, Eugene Podskal, Mooing Duck, Praetorian c++ Aug 22 '14 at 18:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 5
    The best way is how you have it. I also like how you have it sorted by job title. – chris Aug 22 '14 at 18:07
  • 6
    Works for me. What seem to be the problem? – Igor Tandetnik Aug 22 '14 at 18:08
  • 1
    This should work if you use a compiler compatible with C++11 standard. – dasblinkenlight Aug 22 '14 at 18:10
6

In C++11, what you have works fine (assuming you add an identifier name to the variable declaration).

In versions prior, one approach would be to have a free function that builds the map:

typedef std::map<std::string, std::pair<some_enum, std::string> > map_type;

static map_type create_map()
{
    map_type map;

    map["1234a"] = std::make_pair(BOSS, "Alice");
    map["5678b"] = std::make_pair(SLAVE, "Bob");
    map["1111b"] = std::make_pair(IT_GUY, "Cathy");

    return map;
}

map_type foo = create_map();

Or you can make use of Boost.Assign:

std::map<std::string, std::pair<some_enum, std::string> > foo =
    boost::assign::map_list_of("1234a", std::make_pair(BOSS, "Alice"))
                              ("5678b", std::make_pair(SLAVE, "Bob"))
                              ("1111b", std::make_pair(IT_GUY, "Cathy"));
  • (missing brackets after make_pair) – Piotr Skotnicki Aug 22 '14 at 18:17
  • 2
    @PiotrS. They are not required; the compiler will infer the template type arguments. (That's the whole reason for std::make_pair -- if you were going to specify the template type arguments yourself you could just use the std::pair constructor directly.) – cdhowie Aug 22 '14 at 18:17
  • 1
    I meant () brackets, not <> – Piotr Skotnicki Aug 22 '14 at 18:20
  • @PiotrS. Ah, you meant parens. Good catch, I will fix that. – cdhowie Aug 22 '14 at 18:21
  • 2
    If there's one thing I've learned from SO, it's to never say brackets and expect people to know which kind you're talking about. – chris Aug 22 '14 at 18:22
6

The best way in C++11:

std::map<string, pair<some_enum, std::string>> my_map = {
  { "1234a", { BOSS, "Alice" }},
  { "5678b", { SLAVE, "Bob" }},
  { "1111b", { IT_GUY, "Cathy" }},
};

It's that easy.

It's not possible at all in standard C++03 without using external libraries like boost.

  • 1
    C++03 isn't too bad. Something like boost::whatever_map_list_of("1234a", std::make_pair(BOSS, "Alice"))("5678b", …) – chris Aug 22 '14 at 18:13
  • Hmm, I was thinking about standard C++. I'll let other talk about boost, because I don't have much experience with it. – cubuspl42 Aug 22 '14 at 18:15

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