6

I have about 100k Outlook mail items that have about 500-600 chars per Body. I have a list of 580 keywords that must search through each body, then append the words at the bottom.

I believe I've increased the efficiency of the majority of the function, but it still takes a lot of time. Even for 100 emails it takes about 4 seconds.

I run two functions for each keyword list (290 keywords each list).

       public List<string> Keyword_Search(HtmlNode nSearch)
    {
        var wordFound = new List<string>();
        foreach (string currWord in _keywordList)
        {
            bool isMatch = Regex.IsMatch(nSearch.InnerHtml, "\\b" + @currWord + "\\b",
                                                  RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
            if (isMatch)
            {
                wordFound.Add(currWord);
            }
        }
        return wordFound;
    }

Is there anyway I can increase the efficiency of this function?

The other thing that might be slowing it down is that I use HTML Agility Pack to navigate through some nodes and pull out the body (nSearch.InnerHtml). The _keywordList is a List item, and not an array.

  • 10
    Don't guess, get a profiler on it – Paolo Mar 30 '10 at 13:23
  • I have dotTrace but it doesn't work on Outlook Addins. – cam Mar 30 '10 at 13:26
  • From my experience calls into the COM API are usually a bottleneck (in your case retrieving the 100k items) and the only thing you can do is to try to reduce the number of those calls. But as already stated by Paolo it's best to get a profiler on it or to use the StopWatch class if your profiler doesn't support add-ins. – Dirk Vollmar Mar 30 '10 at 13:30
  • Outlook Addins don't allow multiple threads, AFAIK. Doesn't the stop watch require this? – cam Mar 30 '10 at 13:41
  • 1
    How are you getting this list of 100K outlook items? Iterating through outlook items could be a cause of this lack of speed. – Mesh Mar 30 '10 at 14:07

10 Answers 10

7

I assume that the COM call nSearch.InnerHtml is pretty slow and you repeat the call for every single word that you are checking. You can simply cache the result of the call:

public List<string> Keyword_Search(HtmlNode nSearch)
{
    var wordFound = new List<string>();

    // cache inner HTML
    string innerHtml = nSearch.InnerHtml;

    foreach (string currWord in _keywordList)
    {
        bool isMatch = Regex.IsMatch(innerHtml, "\\b" + @currWord + "\\b",
                                              RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
        if (isMatch)
        {
            wordFound.Add(currWord);
        }
    }
    return wordFound;
}

Another optimization would be the one suggested by Jeff Yates. E.g. by using a single pattern:

string pattern = @"(\b(?:" + string.Join("|", _keywordList) + @")\b)";
  • Simplified pattern: @"(\b(?:" + string.Join("|", _keywordList) + @")\b)" – Konrad Rudolph Mar 30 '10 at 14:09
  • @Konrad Rudolph: Oh yes, sure, much nicer that way. – Dirk Vollmar Mar 30 '10 at 16:15
2

I don't think this is a job for regular expressions. You might be better off searching each message word by word and checking each word against your word list. With the approach you have, you're searching each message n times where n is the number of words you want to find - it's no wonder that it takes a while.

  • Yes, that's all I'm trying to do. I assumed it was the most efficient/accurate way. – cam Mar 30 '10 at 13:42
2

Most of the time comes form matches that fail, so you want to minimize failures.

If the search keyword are not frequent, you can test for all of them at the same time (with regexp \b(aaa|bbb|ccc|....)\b), then you exclude the emails with no matches. The one that have at least one match, you do a thorough search.

1

one thing you can easily do is match agaist all the words in one go by building an expression like:

\b(?:word1|word2|word3|....)\b

Then you can precompile the pattern and reuse it to look up all occurencesfor each email (not sure how you do this with .Net API, but there must be a way).

Another thing is instead of using the ignorecase flag, if you convert everything to lowercase, that might give you a small speed boost (need to profile it as it's implementation dependent). Don't forget to warm up the CLR when you profile.

  • If combining the words into one regex, they'll need to use groups for each word otherwise they won't be able to track what matched. – Jeff Yates Mar 30 '10 at 13:44
  • @Jeff - That's what I thought as well. But I just realized that when using word boundaries the matches will always be the words themselves. So in fact you can simply add the value of each match to the wordFound List. See my answer for my implementation. – Steve Wortham Mar 30 '10 at 21:10
  • @Steve: Good point. Seems obvious now you point it out. Cheers. – Jeff Yates Mar 31 '10 at 2:02
1

This may be faster. You can leverage Regex Groups like this:

    public List<string> Keyword_Search(HtmlNode nSearch)
    {
        var wordFound = new List<string>();

        // cache inner HTML
        string innerHtml = nSearch.InnerHtml;
        string pattern = "(\\b" + string.Join("\\b)|(\\b", _keywordList) + "\\b)";
        Regex myRegex = new Regex(pattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
        MatchCollection myMatches = myRegex.Matches(innerHtml);

        foreach (Match myMatch in myMatches)
        {
            // Group 0 represents the entire match so we skip that one
            for (int i = 1; i < myMatch.Groups.Count; i++)
            {
                if (myMatch.Groups[i].Success)
                    wordFound.Add(_keywordList[i-1]);
            }
        }

        return wordFound;
    }    

This way you're only using one regular expression. And the indices of the Groups should correlate with your _keywordList by an offset of 1, hence the line wordFound.Add(_keywordList[i-1]);

UPDATE:

After looking at my code again I just realized that putting the matches into Groups is really unnecessary. And Regex Groups have some overhead. Instead, you could remove the parenthesis from the pattern, and then simply add the matches themselves to the wordFound list. This would produce the same effect, but it'd be faster.

It'd be something like this:

public List<string> Keyword_Search(HtmlNode nSearch)
{
    var wordFound = new List<string>();

    // cache inner HTML
    string innerHtml = nSearch.InnerHtml;
    string pattern = "\\b(?:" + string.Join("|", _keywordList) + ")\\b";
    Regex myRegex = new Regex(pattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
    MatchCollection myMatches = myRegex.Matches(innerHtml);

    foreach (Match myMatch in myMatches)
    {
        wordFound.Add(myMatch.Value);
    }

    return wordFound;
}    
  • Thanks Steve, that's what I meant. If you don't mind could you also let us know whether there is any performance difference between using the ignorecase flag and converting the regex and text to lowercase in advance and matching without ignore case (when you spin the measuring loop you should take out the regex creation, but keep the innerHtml.toLowerCase() inside). – ddimitrov Apr 1 '10 at 14:35
0

Regular expressions can be optimized quite a bit when you just want to match against a fixed set of constant strings. Instead of several matches, e.g. against "winter", "win" or "wombat", you can just match against "w(in(ter)?|ombat)", for example (Jeffrey Friedl's book can give you lots of ideas like this). This kind of optimisation is also built into some programs, notably emacs ('regexp-opt'). I'm not too familiar with .NET, but I assume someone has programmed similar functionality - google for "regexp optimization".

  • Why should this expression be more efficient than winter|wombat|win? They both should get compiled down to approximately the same automaton (minus the capture groups which actually make your expression more complex). I’m not convinced and unfortunately I’m unable to find good information on the technical details. Do you have any good source? – Konrad Rudolph Mar 30 '10 at 14:01
  • It's not provably better than winter|wombat|win, it just saves you from having to trust the regexp compiler to do a good job. It is better than running N separate matches, which was what the OP had. – Kilian Foth Mar 30 '10 at 14:41
0

If the regular expression is indeed the bottle neck, and even optimizing it (by concatenating the search words to one expression) doesn’t help, consider using a multi-pattern search algorithm, such as Wu-Manber.

I’ve posted a very simple implementation here on Stack Overflow. It’s written in C++ but since the code is straightforward it should be easy to translate it to C#.

Notice that this will find words anywhere, not just at word boundaries. However, this can be easily tested after you’ve checked whether the text contains any words; either once again with a regular expression (now you only test individual emails – much faster) or manually by checking the characters before and after the individual hits.

0

If your problem is about searching for outlook items containing certain string, you should get a gain from using outlooks search facilities...

see: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb644806.aspx

0

If your keyword search is straight literals, ie do not contain further regex pattern matches, then other method may be more appropriate. The following code demonstrates one such method, this code only goes through each email once, your code went through each email 290 time( twice)

        public List<string> FindKeywords(string emailbody, List<string> keywordList)
        {
            // may want to clean up the input a bit, such as replacing '.' and ',' with a space
            // and remove double spaces

            string emailBodyAsUppercase = emailbody.ToUpper();

            List<string> emailBodyAsList = new List<string>(emailBodyAsUppercase.Split(' '));

            List<string> foundKeywords = new List<string>(emailBodyAsList.Intersect(keywordList));


            return foundKeywords;
        }
0

If you can use .Net 3.5+ and LINQ you could do something like this.

public static class HtmlNodeTools
{
    public static IEnumerable<string> MatchedKeywords(
        this HtmlNode nSearch,
             IEnumerable<string> keywordList)
    {
        //// as regex
        //var innerHtml = nSearch.InnerHtml;
        //return keywordList.Where(kw =>
        //       Regex.IsMatch(innerHtml, 
        //                     @"\b" + kw + @"\b",
        //                     RegexOptions.IgnoreCase)
        //        );

        //would be faster if you don't need the pattern matching
        var innerHtml = ' ' + nSearch.InnerHtml + ' ';
        return keywordList.Where(kw => innerHtml.Contains(kw));
    }
}
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var keyworkList = new string[] { "hello", "world", "nomatch" };
        var h = new HtmlNode()
        {
            InnerHtml = "hi there hello other world"
        };

        var matched = h.MatchedKeywords(keyworkList).ToList();
        //hello, world
    }
}

... reused regex example ...

public static class HtmlNodeTools
{
    public static IEnumerable<string> MatchedKeywords(
        this HtmlNode nSearch,
             IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, Regex>> keywordList)
    {
        // as regex
        var innerHtml = nSearch.InnerHtml;
        return from kvp in keywordList
               where kvp.Value.IsMatch(innerHtml)
               select kvp.Key;
    }
}
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var keyworkList = new string[] { "hello", "world", "nomatch" };
        var h = new HtmlNode()
        {
            InnerHtml = "hi there hello other world"
        };

        var keyworkSet = keyworkList.Select(kw => 
            new KeyValuePair<string, Regex>(kw, 
                                            new Regex(
                                                @"\b" + kw + @"\b", 
                                                RegexOptions.IgnoreCase)
                                                )
                                            ).ToArray();

        var matched = h.MatchedKeywords(keyworkSet).ToList();
        //hello, world
    }
}
  • the nice think about this way is if you really only want all messages that contain one value in the keyworkList you can replace the .ToList() with .Any() and it will return after the first match. – Matthew Whited Mar 30 '10 at 16:11
  • You may also consider passing IEnumerable<Regex> into the extension method with the keywords already converted to regular expressions. Then you wouldn't keep regenerating the values for each email you scan. – Matthew Whited Mar 30 '10 at 16:13

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