10

Question (From Eloquent Javascript 2nd Edition, Chapter 4, Exercise 4):

Write a function, deepEqual, that takes two values and returns true only if they are the same value or are objects with the same properties whose values are also equal when compared with a recursive call to deepEqual.

Test Cases:

var obj = {here: {is: "an"}, object: 2};
console.log(deepEqual(obj, obj));
// → true
console.log(deepEqual(obj, {here: 1, object: 2}));
// → false
console.log(deepEqual(obj, {here: {is: "an"}, object: 2}));
// → true

My code:

var deepEqual = function (x, y) {
  if ((typeof x == "object" && x != null) && (typeof y == "object" && y != null)) {
    if (Object.keys(x).length != Object.keys(y).length)
      return false;
    for (var prop in x) {
      if (y.hasOwnProperty(prop))
        return deepEqual(x[prop], y[prop]);
    /*This is most likely where my error is. The question states that all the values
    should be checked via recursion; however, with the current setup, only the first
    set of properties will be checked. It passes the test cases, but I would like
    to solve the problem correctly!*/
      }
    }
  else if (x !== y)
    return false;
  else
    return true;
}

I think I have the general idea down; however, like I stated in the comment, the program will not check the second property in the objects. I feel like I have a structural/logic problem and am simply using recursion in the wrong way, as I originally intended to loop through the properties, use recursion to compare the values of the first property, then continue on in the loop to the next property and compare again. Although, I'm not sure if that's even possible?

I've given a good amount of thought and tried a couple different approaches, but this was the most correct answer I've come to so far. Any possible tips to point me in the right direction?

23

As you suspect, you're returning the match of the first property seen. You should return false if that property doesn't match, but keep looking otherwise.

Also, return false if there's no prop property found on y (that is, the counts match, but not the actual properties).

If all properties have matched, return true:

var deepEqual = function (x, y) {
  if (x === y) {
    return true;
  }
  else if ((typeof x == "object" && x != null) && (typeof y == "object" && y != null)) {
    if (Object.keys(x).length != Object.keys(y).length)
      return false;

    for (var prop in x) {
      if (y.hasOwnProperty(prop))
      {  
        if (! deepEqual(x[prop], y[prop]))
          return false;
      }
      else
        return false;
    }

    return true;
  }
  else 
    return false;
}

var deepEqual = function (x, y) {
  if (x === y) {
    return true;
  }
  else if ((typeof x == "object" && x != null) && (typeof y == "object" && y != null)) {
    if (Object.keys(x).length != Object.keys(y).length)
      return false;

    for (var prop in x) {
      if (y.hasOwnProperty(prop))
      {  
        if (! deepEqual(x[prop], y[prop]))
          return false;
      }
      else
        return false;
    }

    return true;
  }
  else 
    return false;
}

var obj = {here: {is: "an", other: "3"}, object: 2};
console.log(deepEqual(obj, obj));
// → true
console.log(deepEqual(obj, {here: 1, object: 2}));
// → false
console.log(deepEqual(obj, {here: {is: "an"}, object: 2}));
// → false
console.log(deepEqual(obj, {here: {is: "an", other: "2"}, object: 2}));
// → false
console.log(deepEqual(obj, {here: {is: "an", other: "3"}, object: 2}));
// → true

  • It'd probably also be a good idea to do a .hasOwnProperty() check on the property of "x", or, better, use the return values already obtained by the calls to Object.keys() to do the iteration, since those will already be limited to "own" properties. – Pointy Aug 22 '14 at 22:08
  • Thanks a lot! I'm still new to recursion, but your changes illustrate a good lesson on the topic. I had an idea why my code didn't work, and your solution is straightforward. Thanks again, and enjoy the upvote! – Gavin Feriancek Aug 22 '14 at 22:47
  • 1
    why not have if(x === y) at the top of the function? that way, if that returns true, it saves having to go through the first large if block – JamesWillett Jul 20 '17 at 15:35
  • Definitely worth trying (and profiling, to see if it actually makes a difference). In this case, I was trying to stay as close as possible to the question's structure, to make the differences clear. – Paul Roub Jul 20 '17 at 16:01
  • Well, I think it may cause stack overflow exception if the object is circular, e.g var a = {foo: 3}; a.bar = a; deepEqual(a, a); – Stephen.W Mar 22 '18 at 3:44
5

Feel that this version is a bit more readable (easier to comprehend). The logic is very similar with the top answer though. (ES6 this time)

function deepEqual(obj1, obj2) {

    if(obj1 === obj2) // it's just the same object. No need to compare.
        return true;

    if(isPrimitive(obj1) && isPrimitive(obj2)) // compare primitives
        return obj1 === obj2;

    if(Object.keys(obj1).length !== Object.keys(obj2).length)
        return false;

    // compare objects with same number of keys
    for(let key in obj1)
    {
        if(!(key in obj2)) return false; //other object doesn't have this prop
        if(!deepEqual(obj1[key], obj2[key])) return false;
    }

    return true;
}

//check if value is primitive
function isPrimitive(obj)
{
    return (obj !== Object(obj));
}

By the way, there is a cheater version of deep equal which works like a charm)) However, it's approximately 1.6 times slower.

As noticed by zero298, this approach is sensitive to the properties ordering and shouldn't be taken seriously

function cheatDeepEqual(obj1, obj2)
{
    return JSON.stringify(obj1) === JSON.stringify(obj2);
}
  • 1
    I think the "cheater" version may fail if property order is not the same. Consider this example tested in node.js: JSON.stringify({foo:"bar",fizz:"buzz"}) === JSON.stringify({fizz:"buzz", foo:"bar"}); is false; but JSON.stringify({foo:"bar",fizz:"buzz"}) === JSON.stringify({foo:"bar",fizz:"buzz"}); is true. – zero298 Feb 21 at 18:43
  • @zero298, yeah, I guess you're right. Anyhow this approach shouldn't be taken too seriously :) – Daniil Andreyevich Baunov Feb 21 at 18:57
2

You can use a variable outside the for loop to keep track of the comparison:

var allPropertiesEqual = true;
for (var prop in x) {
    if (y.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
        allPropertiesEqual = deepEqual(x[prop], y[prop]) && allPropertiesEqual;
    } else {
        allPropertiesEqual = false;
    }
}
return allPropertiesEqual;

The previous example is not optimized on purpose. Because you're comparing objects, you know that you can return false as soon as you find an inequality, and you can keep looping while all the previous checked properties are equal:

for (var prop in x) {
    if (y.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
        if (! deepEqual(x[prop], y[prop]) )
            return false; //first inequality found, return false
    } else {
        return false; //different properties, so inequality, so return false
    }
}
return true;
  • This will return true for { a: 1, b: 2 } compared to { c : 3, d: 4 }, since hasOwnProperty() will always be false and all the tests will be skipped. – Paul Roub Aug 22 '14 at 22:01
  • Right, thanks, should be good now. – Volune Aug 22 '14 at 22:07
  • Thanks for your answer! I wish that I could give a green check to both of you, as you both have good, detailed answers. :( I still gave you an upvote though! – Gavin Feriancek Aug 22 '14 at 22:50
2

I am quite new to JS but this is the way I solved it:

function deepEqual(obj1, obj2) {
if (typeof obj1 === "object" && typeof obj2 === "object") {
    let isObjectMatch = false;
    for (let property1 in obj1) {
        let isPropertyMatch = false;
        for (let property2 in obj2) {
            if (property1 === property2) {
                isPropertyMatch = deepEqual(obj1[property1], obj2[property2])
            }

            if(isPropertyMatch){
                break;
            }
        }

        isObjectMatch  = isPropertyMatch;

        if (!isObjectMatch) {
            break;
        }
    }

    return isObjectMatch;
} else {
    return obj1 === obj2;
}
}

And here are my tests:

var obj = {here: {is: "an"}, object: 2};
console.log(deepEqual(obj, obj));
// → true
console.log(deepEqual(obj, {here: 1, object: 2}));
// → false
console.log(deepEqual(obj, {here: {is: "an"}, object: 2}))
// → true
console.log(deepEqual(obj, {object: 2, here: {is: "an"}}));
// → true
console.log(deepEqual(obj, {object: 1, here: {is: "an"}}));
// → false
console.log(deepEqual(obj, {objectt: 2, here: {is: "an"}}));
// → false
console.log(deepEqual(2, 2));
// → true
console.log(deepEqual(2, 3));
// → false
console.log(deepEqual(2, null));
// → false
console.log(deepEqual(null, null));
// → false
console.log(deepEqual(obj, null));
// → false
1

Although that it's more verbose, maybe this option is easier to read:

function deepEqual(elem1, elem2) {
    if(elem1 === elem2) {
        return true;
    }
    if(typeof elem1 == 'object' && typeof elem2 == 'object' && elem1 != null && elem2 != null) {
      if(Object.keys(elem1).length == Object.keys(elem2).length) {
          for(let key of Object.keys(elem1)) {
              if(elem2.hasOwnProperty(key) != true) {
                  return false;
              }
          }
          for(let key of Object.keys(elem1)) {
              if(typeof elem1[key] == 'object' && typeof elem2[key] == 'object' && typeof elem1[key] != null && typeof elem2[key] != null) {
                  return deepEqual(elem1[key], elem2[key]);
              }
              else {
                if(elem1[key] !== elem2[key]) {
                    return false;
                }
              }
          } else {
            return false;
          }
        }
      }
    else {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
  }
0

<script>
var cmp = function(element, target){

   if(typeof element !== typeof target)
   {
      return false;
   }
   else if(typeof element === "object" && (!target || !element))
   {
      return target === element;
   }
   else if(typeof element === "object")
   {
       var keys_element = Object.keys(element);
       var keys_target  = Object.keys(target);
       
       if(keys_element.length !== keys_target.length)
       {
           return false;
       }
       else
       {
           for(var i = 0; i < keys_element.length; i++)
           {
                if(keys_element[i] !== keys_target[i])
                    return false;
                if(!cmp(element[keys_element[i]], target[keys_target[i]]))
                    return false;
           }
		   return true;
       }
   }
   else
   {
   	   return element === target;

   }
};

console.log(cmp({
    key1: 3,
    key2: "string",
    key3: [4, "45", {key4: [5, "6", false, null, {v:1}]}]
}, {
    key1: 3,
    key2: "string",
    key3: [4, "45", {key4: [5, "6", false, null, {v:1}]}]
})); // true

console.log(cmp({
    key1: 3,
    key2: "string",
    key3: [4, "45", {key4: [5, "6", false, null, {v:1}]}]
}, {
    key1: 3,
    key2: "string",
    key3: [4, "45", {key4: [5, "6", undefined, null, {v:1}]}]
})); // false
</script>

-1

I just went through this chapter and wanted to show my work, too.

The flaw in mine (let me know if there are more) is that the object properties have to be in exact order as well. I much prefer @paul and @danni's solution.

// Deep equal 
const deepEqual = (x, y) => {
  const xType = typeof x;
  const yType = typeof y; 
  
  if ( xType === 'object' && yType === 'object' && ( x !== null && y !== null ) ) {
    const xKeys = Object.keys(x);
    const yKeys = Object.keys(y);
    const xValues = Object.values(x);
    const yValues = Object.values(y);  
    
    // check length of both arrays
    if ( xKeys.length !== yKeys.length ) return false;
    
    // compare keys
    for ( i = 0; i < xKeys.length; i++ )
      if (xKeys[i] !== yKeys[i]) return false;
      
    // compare values
    for ( i = 0; i < xValues.length; i++ )
      if (!deepEqual(xValues[i], yValues[i])) return false;
      
  } else {
    if ( x !== y ) return false;
  }
  return true;
};

// Objects
let obj1 = {
  value: false,
  pets: null
};

let obj2 = {
  value: false,
  pets: null
};


let obj3 = {
  value: false,
  pets: {
    cat: false,
    dog: {
      better: 'yes'
    }
  }
};

let obj4 = {
  value: false,
  pets: { 
    cat: false,
    dog: {
      better: 'yes'
    }
  }
};


let obj5 = {
  value: false,
  dog: true
};

let obj6 = {
  value: false,
  cat: true
};


let obj7 = {
  value: true,
  dog: {
    cat: {
      wow: true
    }
  }
};

let obj8 = {
  value: true,
  dog: {
    cat: {
      wow: false
    }
  }
};


let obj9 = {
  value: true,
  dog: {
    cat: {
      wow: true
    }
  }
};

let obj10 = {
  dog: {
    cat: {
      wow: true
    }
  },
  value: true
};

// Just for building a pretty result, ignore if you'd like
const result = (x, y) => {
  return `For: <br/>
          ${JSON.stringify(x)} <br/>
          and <br/>
          ${JSON.stringify(y)} <br/>
          <span>>> ${deepEqual(x, y)}</span>`;
};

// To print results in
const resultDivs = document.querySelectorAll('.result');

resultDivs[0].innerHTML = result(obj1, obj2);
resultDivs[1].innerHTML = result(obj3, obj4);
resultDivs[2].innerHTML = result(obj5, obj6);
resultDivs[3].innerHTML = result(obj7, obj8);
resultDivs[4].innerHTML = result(obj9, obj10);
body {
  font-family: monospace;
}

span {
  color: #a0a0a0;
}

.result {
  margin-bottom: 1em;
}
<div class="result">
</div>

<div class="result">
</div>

<div class="result">
</div>

<div class="result">
</div>

<div class="result">
</div>

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