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I created a pair of public/private RSA keys by using Elite EL SDK Basic v3.3.2.0 tool. (You can find it here under resources tab. It's free)

Now, I want to check correctness of these pair of RSA keys. As far as I know, I can crate a public key from the private key using the below command, and then compare two public keys if are equal or not(the previous public key and this new publiv key) :

> openssl rsa -in <MyPrivateKey> -out <AnAddressForOutput> -pubout

First of all I convert the format of my private key to base64, using this online tool.

Then I run above command command, but I receive the below error :

enter image description here

I took a look at the private.txt , and this is its contents :
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As far as I know, every public/private key must have two below lines :

-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----

Private key data

-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----

And

-----BEGIN RSA PUBLIC KEY-----

Private key data

-----END RSA PUBLIC KEY-----

Does that mean my tool (Elite EL SDK Basic) doesn't work right? Or I am wrong in one of the above steps?


FYI : This is base64 view of the public key generated with Elite EL SDK Basic :

8kP5IpV/oROe6Sb8q5GypqmDCJToHlc2Xbi/sui6/VHu4kaD9pZNJlwP0HVTjyMuQLySzDhPtP8n
xlZeG6jZZPxCMc7na0M+O67z0p5AKoxjELkp4ajiVdjTp0oAYFdkRM782ThA5Hvh+rnt6n++RCZx
HMqa+/dzgG/ONUbI/EMAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAEAAQ==
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  • "Then I run above command command, but I receive the below error..." - you should paste text, not screen images. Here', I'm referring to the rsa command you used. Try piping though base64 --decode command and then adding -inform DER option to rsa command. – jww Aug 23 '14 at 9:17
  • "I want to check correctness of these pair of RSA keys..." - The OpenSSL RSA command has a -check option. See OpenSSL's rsa(1) docs. – jww Aug 23 '14 at 9:20
  • Your key is only 1024 bits, key sizes that low should not be used (anymore). – Maarten Bodewes Aug 23 '14 at 12:01
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Your key is in a proprietary format. The format is pretty simple though:

  • 1024 bit modulus (always starting with the high bit set
  • 1024 bit public exponent (easily recognized by the leading zero's followed by the fourth number of Fermat, 65537 in binary)
  • 1024 bit private exponent (large number lower than the modulus)
  • the 5 CRT parameters, all in 512 bit encodings

OpenSSL does not read these kind of private keys. You need to verify your key another way, or create a OpenSSL compatible key from it.

Teaser using your key from import java.security.spec.RSAPrivateCrtKeySpec and import org.bouncycastle.openssl.jcajce.JcaPEMWriter:

$ openssl rsa -check -in somekey.pkcs8.pem 
RSA key ok
writing RSA key
-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----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-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----

To test a private key in PKCS#8 format, the best way to go about this is to use -inform DER instead of converting to base 64.

Base64 is only part of the PEM format. It can requires the headers to be present as well. Sometimes the keys can be concatenated as well. You need to add the headers yourself if you want to verify the private key using PEM.

Also note that OpenSSL already has conversion routines and base64 encoding build in, even on the command line.


As a side note, I don't understand why you want to check the correctness of the output of one single program. If you really want to test correctness, you could think of performing a sign/verify or encrypt/decrypt using the public and private key.

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  • I use rsa -inform DER -in <PRIVATE-KEY> -out D:\1 -pubout. Unable to load! again! :( – TheGoodUser Aug 23 '14 at 11:20
  • Sorry, but you actually need to program your way out of this. That's fine though, makes the question on topic. Your key is valid though (and pretty well known by everyone on the Internet by now). – Maarten Bodewes Aug 23 '14 at 11:55
  • Sorry Mr Owlstead, But I don't understand some part of your answer. Did you mean I can't check these pair of RSA keys via OpenSSL? Would you please explain more clear? (It's very good if you give me a command to verify my keys!) really appreciate your time and consoderation – TheGoodUser Aug 23 '14 at 12:20
  • 1
    Not through the command line no, you need a program to do this. I can validate your key and convert to OpenSSL format using Java, for instance. Obviously it is also possible using just OpenSSL and C. – Maarten Bodewes Aug 23 '14 at 12:23
  • Excuse me Mr. Olwstead. Can I check the keys with ssh-keygen in linux? – TheGoodUser Aug 23 '14 at 13:04

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