23

I'm trying to use a select in a loop to receive either a message or a timeout signal. If the timeout signal is received, the loop should abort:

package main
import ("fmt"; "time")
func main() {
    done := time.After(1*time.Millisecond)
    numbers := make(chan int)
    go func() {for n:=0;; {numbers <- n; n++}}()
    for {
        select {
            case <-done:
                break
            case num := <- numbers:
                fmt.Println(num)
        }
    }
}

However, it doesn't seem to be stopping:

$ go run a.go
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[...]
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[...]

Why? Am I using time.After wrong?

1
  • If you keep waiting for something that has already happened, you will never timeout. – David Schwartz Aug 24 '14 at 8:08
26

The Go spec says:

A "break" statement terminates execution of the innermost "for", "switch", or "select" statement within the same function.

In your example you're just breaking out of the select statement. If you replace break with a return statement you will see that it's working.

11
  • 1
    But why does break do anything in a select/switch? I thought they already break out by default and that's why there's the fallthrough keyword? – Dog Aug 24 '14 at 13:48
  • A select statement is not a switch statement. fallthrough only applies to switch statements, see the spec – Pat Aug 24 '14 at 14:09
  • This might be confusing because people sometimes speak of "falling through" in a select statement but that is something entirely different. It's when you have a default clause that makes the select statement non-blocking. – Pat Aug 24 '14 at 14:11
  • 1
    And you might want to use a break statement when you want to exit a larger case-block. (Haha, I hope I didn't cause more confusion...) – Pat Aug 24 '14 at 14:13
  • You could exit the case clause by using if, or goto, or another switch, but ok? So I guess I need to use a labeled break like in Martin's answer every time I have a process that receives multiple messages from more than one channel? – Dog Aug 24 '14 at 14:19
17

The "Go" way for that kind of situations is to use labels and break on the label, for example:

L:
    for {
        select {
            case <-done:
                break L
            case num := <- numbers:
                fmt.Println(num)
        }
    }

Ref:

0
10

In your example code, a return seems appropriate as Pat says, but for future reference you can use labels:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    done := time.After(1 * time.Millisecond)
    numbers := make(chan int)

    // Send to channel
    go func() {
        for n := 0; ; {
            numbers <- n
            n++
        }
    }()

readChannel:
    for {
        select {
        case <-done:
            break readChannel
        case num := <-numbers:
            fmt.Println(num)
        }
    }

    // Additional logic...
    fmt.Println("Howdy")
}
3
  • I've added a minus because labels for loops are a thing that hurts the readability of the code more than anything else I know including global variables in my opinion. I think they should be avoided at any cost. – Dmitry Verhoturov Oct 11 '20 at 21:45
  • @DmitryVerhoturov This is cargo cult nonsense. Go included labels and goto for a reason (and excluded many other more "popular" features instead). If you need to break out of a loop from inside a select statement using a label is a reasonable solution. It's not like you even provided an alternative (which I suppose would be to set a local variable in the select and check it right outside to perform the break). – Evan Oct 23 '20 at 21:20
  • A more readable alternative is just around a corner, it's separating a loop to separate function with returns inside it. Return is way more readable than break label. If it's a "cargo cult", please provide an example from real code where a separate function with the return will become easier to comprehend after removing the function and introducing a label: I can't think of one in any Go code I've seen so far, and on the opposite, I saw many places which could be improved by introducing a function. – Dmitry Verhoturov Oct 24 '20 at 22:57
6

I have the following solution, by using a anonymous function.

    func() {
    for {
        select {
        case <-time.After(5 * time.Second):
            if token := c.Connect(); token.Wait() && token.Error() != nil {
                fmt.Println("connect err:", token.Error())
            } else {
                fmt.Println("breaking")
                return
            }
        }
    }
    }()
0

How about using some control variable to skip the loop? It's kind of hard or not so easy to understand with breaking label sometimes.

package main
import ("fmt"; "time")
func main() {
    done := time.After(1*time.Millisecond)
    numbers := make(chan int)
    go func() {for n:=0;; {numbers <- n; n++}}()
    completed := false
    for !completed {
        select {
            case <-done:
                completed = true
                // no break needed here
            case num := <- numbers:
                fmt.Println(num)
        }
    }
}

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