278

Does anyone know how to validate an e-mail address in Swift? I found this code:

- (BOOL) validEmail:(NSString*) emailString {

    if([emailString length]==0){
        return NO;
    }

    NSString *regExPattern = @"[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,4}";

    NSRegularExpression *regEx = [[NSRegularExpression alloc] initWithPattern:regExPattern options:NSRegularExpressionCaseInsensitive error:nil];
    NSUInteger regExMatches = [regEx numberOfMatchesInString:emailString options:0 range:NSMakeRange(0, [emailString length])];

    NSLog(@"%i", regExMatches);
    if (regExMatches == 0) {
        return NO;
    } else {
        return YES;
    }
}

but I can't translate it to Swift.

  • 7
    translation should be straightforward. what part is giving you problems? – Sulthan Aug 24 '14 at 11:19
  • The problem was " NSRegularExpression *regEx = [[NSRegularExpression alloc] initWithPattern:regExPattern options:NSRegularExpressionCaseInsensitive error:nil]; " – Giorgio Nocera Aug 24 '14 at 11:44
  • 10
    Don't forget to pray that none of your users has one of the new top level domains. E.g. .coffee – Matthias Bauch Feb 8 '15 at 12:50
  • 1
    @Antzi: I checked with "someone@gmail" and your regex returned true. – Đông An Jul 7 '16 at 15:36
  • 2
    Regexes don't work for validating that users have entered their e-mail address. The only 100% correct way is to send an activation e-mail. See: I Knew How To Validate An Email Address Until I Read The RFC – mouviciel Sep 18 '17 at 9:03

34 Answers 34

679

I would use NSPredicate:

 func isValidEmail(testStr:String) -> Bool {        
    let emailRegEx = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,64}"

    let emailTest = NSPredicate(format:"SELF MATCHES %@", emailRegEx)
    return emailTest.evaluate(with: testStr)
}

for versions of Swift earlier than 3.0:

 func isValidEmail(testStr:String) -> Bool {

    let emailRegEx = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,64}"

    let emailTest = NSPredicate(format:"SELF MATCHES %@", emailRegEx)
    return emailTest.evaluate(with: testStr)
}

for versions of Swift earlier than 1.2:

 class func isValidEmail(testStr:String) -> Bool {

    let emailRegEx = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,64}"

    if let emailTest = NSPredicate(format:"SELF MATCHES %@", emailRegEx) {
        return emailTest.evaluateWithObject(testStr)
    }
    return false
}
  • 5
    wouldn't return emailTest.evaluateWithObject(testStr) be a lot more simpler and readable? Comparing to == true is a bit like Javascript. – Sulthan Aug 24 '14 at 11:55
  • 13
    It doesn't check if there is an extension available, a@a is already OK :( – CularBytes Jul 12 '15 at 19:55
  • 1
    it accepts emails starting with a dot, however its a RegEx issue – t0a0 Mar 21 '16 at 11:07
  • 4
    this does not validate for test@test...com – Alan Oct 27 '16 at 17:23
  • 2
    This doesn't detect email.@invalid.com or email@.invalid.com. The answer below from @alexcristea does – Ben Sullivan Nov 23 '16 at 9:42
102

Editing, updated for Swift 3:

func validateEmail(enteredEmail:String) -> Bool {

    let emailFormat = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,64}"
    let emailPredicate = NSPredicate(format:"SELF MATCHES %@", emailFormat)
    return emailPredicate.evaluate(with: enteredEmail)

}

Original answer for Swift 2:

func validateEmail(enteredEmail:String) -> Bool {

    let emailFormat = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,64}"
    let emailPredicate = NSPredicate(format:"SELF MATCHES %@", emailFormat)
    return emailPredicate.evaluateWithObject(enteredEmail)

}

It's working fine.

  • 2
    the first with a valid regex. the others validate aa@aach to true – netshark1000 Mar 7 '16 at 14:50
  • 8
    This should be the top answer. Not that ohne with a wrong regex – netshark1000 Mar 8 '16 at 6:38
  • 1
    @netshark1000, only with upvotes, any answer will be on top. :) – Azik Abdullah Mar 8 '16 at 10:01
  • 1
    Yes the only working solution. cheers! – manukv May 8 '18 at 12:29
  • 1
    This should be selected as the correct answer. – SeaWarrior404 Jun 11 '18 at 10:14
101

As a String class extension

SWIFT 4

extension String {
    func isValidEmail() -> Bool {
        // here, `try!` will always succeed because the pattern is valid
        let regex = try! NSRegularExpression(pattern: "^[a-zA-Z0-9.!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?(?:\\.[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?)*$", options: .caseInsensitive)
        return regex.firstMatch(in: self, options: [], range: NSRange(location: 0, length: count)) != nil
    }
}

Usage

if "rdfsdsfsdfsd".isValidEmail() {

}
  • 4
    countElements is now count – Zack Shapiro Jul 28 '15 at 22:08
  • 3
    This should be the accepted answer. – user1366265 Aug 4 '15 at 13:58
  • 20
    xxx@yyy return true? – Cullen SUN Sep 28 '15 at 16:18
  • 1
    Same as Cullen SUN, foo@bar return true. – Rémy Virin Oct 15 '15 at 23:22
  • 4
    This should be down voted because xxx@yyy return valid email ... – Jose Pose S Nov 20 '18 at 7:52
45

If you are looking for a clean and simple solution to do this, you should take a look at https://github.com/nsagora/validation-components.

It contains an email validation predicate which is easy integrate in your code:

let email = "test@example.com"
let rule = EmailValidationPredicate()
let isValidEmail = rule.evaluate(with: email)

Behind the hood it uses the RFC 5322 reg ex (http://emailregex.com):

let regex = "(?:[\\p{L}0-9!#$%\\&'*+/=?\\^_`{|}~-]+(?:\\.[\\p{L}0-9!#$%\\&'*+/=?\\^_`{|}" +
    "~-]+)*|\"(?:[\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x21\\x23-\\x5b\\x5d-\\" +
    "x7f]|\\\\[\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x7f])*\")@(?:(?:[\\p{L}0-9](?:[a-" +
    "z0-9-]*[\\p{L}0-9])?\\.)+[\\p{L}0-9](?:[\\p{L}0-9-]*[\\p{L}0-9])?|\\[(?:(?:25[0-5" +
    "]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-" +
    "9][0-9]?|[\\p{L}0-9-]*[\\p{L}0-9]:(?:[\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x21" +
    "-\\x5a\\x53-\\x7f]|\\\\[\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x7f])+)\\])"
  • 3
    Wow, didn't know about emailregex.com. It is awesome! – Samuel Ev Nov 11 '16 at 3:10
  • 2
    Finally, one that filters email.@.email.com – Ben Sullivan Nov 23 '16 at 9:41
  • I think this should be the correct answer. Thanks, man! – Venugopal Reddy D Oct 9 '17 at 10:11
  • 2
    @alexcristea good job, it uses tons of validation. – Jack Jul 13 '18 at 5:48
  • it's working with exact -- abcd@abcd.com . it's not validate abc@abc – Anil Gupta Oct 11 '18 at 11:40
24

Here is a fuse of the two most up-voted answer with the correct regex: a String extension using predicate so you can call string.isEmail

    extension String {
        var isEmail: Bool {
           let emailRegEx = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,20}"            
           let emailTest  = NSPredicate(format:"SELF MATCHES %@", emailRegEx)
           return emailTest.evaluateWithObject(self)
        }
    }
  • This one is not even close to being correct. – Fattie Feb 18 at 14:11
24

Here's the reasonable solution:

"THE REASONABLE SOLUTION"

Used and tested for years in many huge volume apps.

1 - it avoids the many terrible regex mistakes you often see in these suggestions

2 - it does NOT allow stupid emails such as "x@x" which are technically valid, but are completely silly - and your support staff would instantly reject anyway. If you need a solution that allows silly emails, use another solution.

3 - the code is extremely understandable

4 - It is KISS, reliable, and tested to destruction on commercial apps with enormous numbers of users

let __firstpart = "[A-Z0-9a-z]([A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]{0,30}[A-Z0-9a-z])?"
let __serverpart = "([A-Z0-9a-z]([A-Z0-9a-z-]{0,30}[A-Z0-9a-z])?\\.){1,5}"
let __emailRegex = __firstpart + "@" + __serverpart + "[A-Za-z]{2,8}"
let __emailPredicate = NSPredicate(format: "SELF MATCHES %@", __emailRegex)

extension String {
    func isEmail() -> Bool {
        return __emailPredicate.evaluate(with: self)
    }
}

extension UITextField {
    func isEmail() -> Bool {
        return self.text.isEmail()
    }
}

Explanation:

In the following description, "OC" means ordinary character - a letter or a digit.

__firstpart ... has to start and end with an OC. For the characters in the middle you can have a few unusual characters such as underscore, but the start and end have to be OC. (However - notice the brackets - it's ok to have only one OC an that's it, for example: j@blah.com)

__serverpart ... You have sections like "blah." which repeat. (So mail.city.fcu.edu type of thing.) The sections have to start and end with an OC, but in the middle you can also have a dash "-". (If you want to allow other unusual characters in there, say underscore, just add before the dash.) It's OK to have a section which is just one OC. (As in joe@w.campus.edu) You can have up to five sections; you have to have one. Finally the TLD (such as .com) is strictly 2 to 8 in size.


IMPORTANT !

You must keep the predicate as a global, do not build it every time.

Note that this is the first thing Apple mentions about the issue in the docs

It's very surprising when you see suggestions which do not cache the predicate.

  • 1
    Does it support new TLDs like .engineer? – Roman Jun 26 '18 at 12:45
  • hi @Roman - notice where it clearly says "Finally the TLD (.com or the like) is strictly 2 to 8 letters." That takes care of it. You can change the "8" to a value you prefer. (For now, in many large companies, customer service will simply reject any long TLDs as just a scam - but anyway, it's your decision, use "8" or any value you like.) – Fattie Jun 26 '18 at 15:03
  • 2
    With regards to point (4): how did you test with a lot of users? Did you track the users, that could not sign up with the commercial apps, because the regex did prevent them from using their email address? The only "reasonable" should be, what the spec (RFC) specifies or if this can not be achieved, then something that is more relaxed, but covers everything from the spec. If the users are not allowed to enter x@x, they will enter some garbage@example.com which will pass your/any regex. – thetrutz Jul 31 '18 at 12:40
  • hi @thetrutz , "garbage@example.com" is an utterly normal email address. the RFC includes theoretical idiocy like "x@x". any actual commercial client you or I ever work for will say "disallow those". (note that in any real-world large business, there are vastly more restrictions than my rough outline here, as I mention in the comment above to Roman.) Your final sentence is confusing - of course a "non functioning email" will pass any local test? What do you mean? Obviously emails are only ultimately verified through "confirm your email" systems. – Fattie Jul 31 '18 at 14:39
  • 1
    return self.text.isEmail should end with () – Regis St-Gelais Dec 12 '18 at 13:55
15

This is the updated version for Swift 2.0 - 2.2

 var isEmail: Bool {
    do {
        let regex = try NSRegularExpression(pattern: "^[a-zA-Z0-9.!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?(?:\\.[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?)*$", options: .CaseInsensitive)
        return regex.firstMatchInString(self, options: NSMatchingOptions(rawValue: 0), range: NSMakeRange(0, self.characters.count)) != nil
    } catch {
        return false
    }
}
  • 8
    foo@bar returns true ?! – Rémy Virin Oct 15 '15 at 23:23
  • 2
    validates aa@aach to true – netshark1000 Mar 7 '16 at 14:50
  • 3
    That's because the RFC validates these email adresses to true ;) – dulgan Aug 4 '16 at 8:48
  • Note that NSRange length property should use String utf16.count instead of characters.count – Leo Dabus Feb 22 '18 at 18:54
  • it's really wrong / poor to not cache the predicate. it's the first thing Apple says about the issue in the doco. a glaring mistake made by most of the answers on the page. – Fattie May 15 '18 at 20:32
15

I would suggest using it as an extension of String:

extension String {    
    public var isEmail: Bool {
        let dataDetector = try? NSDataDetector(types: NSTextCheckingResult.CheckingType.link.rawValue)

        let firstMatch = dataDetector?.firstMatch(in: self, options: NSRegularExpression.MatchingOptions.reportCompletion, range: NSRange(location: 0, length: length))

        return (firstMatch?.range.location != NSNotFound && firstMatch?.url?.scheme == "mailto")
    }

    public var length: Int {
        return self.characters.count
    }
}

And to use it:

if "hodor@gameofthrones.com".isEmail { // true
    print("Hold the Door")
}
  • 7
    haha hold the door ! – user1951992 Jul 6 '16 at 11:49
  • 1
    Note that NSRange length property should use String utf16.count instead of characters.count – Leo Dabus Feb 22 '18 at 18:54
  • Update Swift 4: extension String { public var isEmail: Bool { let dataDetector = try? NSDataDetector(types: NSTextCheckingResult.CheckingType.link.rawValue) let firstMatch = dataDetector?.firstMatch(in: self, options: NSRegularExpression.MatchingOptions.reportCompletion, range: NSRange(location: 0, length: count)) return (firstMatch?.range.location != NSNotFound && firstMatch?.url?.scheme == "mailto") } – Duan Nguyen Apr 12 '18 at 8:31
8

Here is a method based on rangeOfString:

class func isValidEmail(testStr:String) -> Bool {
    let emailRegEx = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,64}"
    let range = testStr.rangeOfString(emailRegEx, options:.RegularExpressionSearch)
    let result = range != nil ? true : false
    return result
}

Note: updated TLD length.

Here is the definitive RegEx for email as per RFC 5322, note that this is best not used because it only checks the basic syntax of email addresses and does not check is the top level domain exists.

(?:[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+(?:\.[a-z0-9!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+)*
  |  "(?:[\x01-\x08\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x1f\x21\x23-\x5b\x5d-\x7f]
      |  \\[\x01-\x09\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x7f])*")
@ (?:(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?
  |  \[(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.){3}
       (?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?|[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]:
          (?:[\x01-\x08\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x1f\x21-\x5a\x53-\x7f]
          |  \\[\x01-\x09\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x7f])+)
     \])

See Regular-Expressions.info for more complete information on email RegExs.

Note that no escaping as required by a language such as Objective-C or Swift.

  • 1
    the emailRegEx you use is just plain wrong. It only allow for TLDs 2 to 4 characters long, while domains like .engineer exists. – Antzi Jun 15 '15 at 14:30
  • Understood, I am not defending my answer but the level of the edit. Add a comment as above, down-vote, point to a better answer, add your own answer. It is not appropriate to substantially change an answer. I have added the diffusive RegEx for completeness. – zaph Jun 15 '15 at 14:48
  • this answer is completely wrong. (as are many on this page) – Fattie May 15 '18 at 20:28
7

There are a lot of right answers here, but many of the "regex" are incomplete and it can happen that an email like: "name@domain" results a valid email, but it is not. Here the complete solution:

extension String {

    var isEmailValid: Bool {
        do {
            let regex = try NSRegularExpression(pattern: "(?:[a-z0-9!#$%\\&'*+/=?\\^_`{|}~-]+(?:\\.[a-z0-9!#$%\\&'*+/=?\\^_`{|}~-]+)*|\"(?:[\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x21\\x23-\\x5b\\x5d-\\x7f]|\\\\[\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x7f])*\")@(?:(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?|\\[(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?|[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]:(?:[\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x21-\\x5a\\x53-\\x7f]|\\\\[\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x7f])+)\\])", options: .CaseInsensitive)
            return regex.firstMatchInString(self, options: NSMatchingOptions(rawValue: 0), range: NSMakeRange(0, self.characters.count)) != nil
        } catch {
            return false
        }
    }
}
  • does not work properly, it lets you add spaces after domain. – Juan Boero Mar 14 '16 at 22:11
  • Note that NSRange length property should use String utf16.count instead of characters.count – Leo Dabus Feb 22 '18 at 18:53
  • @Fattie argue your statement. Your comment is very useless, suggest an improvement, propose a fix. Saying completely wrong is very stupid and underlies a close mentality – Andrea.Ferrando Feb 21 at 11:24
  • Sorry: it has so many mistakes (some already mentioned). – Fattie Feb 21 at 11:51
7

I prefer use an extension for that. Besides, this url http://emailregex.com can help you to test if regex is correct. In fact, the site offers differents implementations for some programming languages. I share my implementation for Swift 3.

extension String {
    func validateEmail() -> Bool {
        let emailRegex = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,6}"
        return NSPredicate(format: "SELF MATCHES %@", emailRegex).evaluate(with: self)
    }
}
  • there are a few problems .. you can have, for example .. blah@.abc with a weird dot there – Fattie Jan 21 '17 at 16:35
6

For swift 2.1: this works correctly with email foo@bar

extension String {
    func isValidEmail() -> Bool {
        do {
            let regex = try NSRegularExpression(pattern: "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,6}", options: .CaseInsensitive)
            return regex.firstMatchInString(self, options: NSMatchingOptions(rawValue: 0), range: NSMakeRange(0, self.characters.count)) != nil
        } catch {
                return false
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    This seems to work fine for me. As far as I understand it you could even omit the 'A-Z' (capital letters) since you have the option .CaseInsensitive set anyway... – AZOM Mar 30 '16 at 12:04
  • @AZOM: Yes, correct – lee5783 Sep 15 '16 at 9:22
  • Note that NSRange length property should use String utf16.count instead of characters.count – Leo Dabus Feb 22 '18 at 18:53
5

Use of Swift 4.2

extension String {
    func isValidEmail() -> Bool {
        let regex = try? NSRegularExpression(pattern: "^(((([a-zA-Z]|\\d|[!#\\$%&'\\*\\+\\-\\/=\\?\\^_`{\\|}~]|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}])+(\\.([a-zA-Z]|\\d|[!#\\$%&'\\*\\+\\-\\/=\\?\\^_`{\\|}~]|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}])+)*)|((\\x22)((((\\x20|\\x09)*(\\x0d\\x0a))?(\\x20|\\x09)+)?(([\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x7f]|\\x21|[\\x23-\\x5b]|[\\x5d-\\x7e]|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}])|(\\([\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0d-\\x7f]|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}]))))*(((\\x20|\\x09)*(\\x0d\\x0a))?(\\x20|\\x09)+)?(\\x22)))@((([a-zA-Z]|\\d|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}])|(([a-zA-Z]|\\d|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}])([a-zA-Z]|\\d|-|\\.|_|~|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}])*([a-zA-Z]|\\d|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}])))\\.)+(([a-zA-Z]|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}])|(([a-zA-Z]|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}])([a-zA-Z]|\\d|-|_|~|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}])*([a-zA-Z]|[\\x{00A0}-\\x{D7FF}\\x{F900}-\\x{FDCF}\\x{FDF0}-\\x{FFEF}])))\\.?$", options: .caseInsensitive)
        return regex?.firstMatch(in: self, options: [], range: NSMakeRange(0, self.count)) != nil
    }
    func isValidName() -> Bool{
        let regex = try? NSRegularExpression(pattern: "^[\\p{L}\\.]{2,30}(?: [\\p{L}\\.]{2,30}){0,2}$", options: .caseInsensitive)

        return regex?.firstMatch(in: self, options: [], range: NSMakeRange(0, self.count)) != nil
    } }

And used

if (textField.text?.isValidEmail())! 
    {
      // bla bla
    }
else 
    {

    }
3

Create simple extension:

extension NSRegularExpression {

    convenience init(pattern: String) {
        try! self.init(pattern: pattern, options: [])
    }
}

extension String {

    var isValidEmail: Bool {
        return isMatching(expression: NSRegularExpression(pattern: "^[A-Z0-9a-z\\._%+-]+@([A-Za-z0-9-]+\\.)+[A-Za-z]{2,4}$"))
    }

    //MARK: - Private

    private func isMatching(expression: NSRegularExpression) -> Bool {
        return expression.numberOfMatches(in: self, range: NSRange(location: 0, length: characters.count)) > 0
    }
}

Example:

"b@bb.pl".isValidEmail //true
"b@bb".isValidEmail //false

You can extend following extension to anything you need: isValidPhoneNumber, isValidPassword etc...

  • Very Swift! Thanks. – RanLearns May 27 '17 at 1:04
  • Note that NSRange length property should use String utf16.count instead of characters.count – Leo Dabus Feb 22 '18 at 18:51
3

This a new version for "THE REASONABLE SOLUTION" by @Fattie, tested on Swift 4.1 in a new file called String+Email.swift:

import Foundation

extension String {
    private static let __firstpart = "[A-Z0-9a-z]([A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]{0,30}[A-Z0-9a-z])?"
    private static let __serverpart = "([A-Z0-9a-z]([A-Z0-9a-z-]{0,30}[A-Z0-9a-z])?\\.){1,5}"
    private static let __emailRegex = __firstpart + "@" + __serverpart + "[A-Za-z]{2,6}"

    public var isEmail: Bool {
        let predicate = NSPredicate(format: "SELF MATCHES %@", type(of:self).__emailRegex)
        return predicate.evaluate(with: self)
    }
}

So its usage is simple:

let str = "mail@domain.com"
if str.isEmail {
    print("\(str) is a valid e-mail address")
} else {
    print("\(str) is not a valid e-mail address")
}

I simply don't like to add a func to the String objects, as being an e-mail address is inherent to them (or not). So a Bool property would fit better than a func, from my understanding.

2

I made a library designed for input validations and one of the "modules" allows you to easily validate a bunch of stuff...

For example to validate an email:

let emailTrial = Trial.Email
let trial = emailTrial.trial()

if(trial(evidence: "test@test.com")) {
   //email is valid
}

SwiftCop is the library... hope it help!

2

In Swift 4.2 and Xcode 10.1

//Email validation
func isValidEmail(email: String) -> Bool {
    let emailRegex = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,4}"
    var valid = NSPredicate(format: "SELF MATCHES %@", emailRegex).evaluate(with: email)
    if valid {
        valid = !email.contains("Invalid email id")
    }
    return valid
}

//Use like this....
let emailTrimmedString = emailTF.text?.trimmingCharacters(in: .whitespaces)
if isValidEmail(email: emailTrimmedString!) == false {
   SharedClass.sharedInstance.alert(view: self, title: "", message: "Please enter valid email")
}

If you want to use SharedClass.

//This is SharedClass
import UIKit
class SharedClass: NSObject {

static let sharedInstance = SharedClass()

//Email validation
func isValidEmail(email: String) -> Bool {
    let emailRegex = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,4}"
    var valid = NSPredicate(format: "SELF MATCHES %@", emailRegex).evaluate(with: email)
    if valid {
        valid = !email.contains("Invalid email id")
    }
    return valid
}

private override init() {

}
}

And call function like this....

if SharedClass.sharedInstance. isValidEmail(email: emailTrimmedString!) == false {
   SharedClass.sharedInstance.alert(view: self, title: "", message: "Please enter correct email")
   //Your code here
} else {
   //Code here
}
1

Best solution with best result for

Swift 4.x

 extension String {

        func validateAsEmail() -> Bool {
            let emailRegEx = "(?:[a-zA-Z0-9!#$%\\&‘*+/=?\\^_`{|}~-]+(?:\\.[a-zA-Z0-9!#$%\\&'*+/=?\\^_`{|}" +
                "~-]+)*|\"(?:[\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x21\\x23-\\x5b\\x5d-\\" +
                "x7f]|\\\\[\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x7f])*\")@(?:(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-" +
                "z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?|\\[(?:(?:25[0-5" +
                "]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-" +
                "9][0-9]?|[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]:(?:[\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x21" +
            "-\\x5a\\x53-\\x7f]|\\\\[\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x7f])+)\\])"

            let emailTest = NSPredicate(format:"SELF MATCHES[c] %@", emailRegEx)
            return emailTest.evaluate(with: self)
        }
    }
0

Since there are so many weird top level domain name now, I stop checking the length of the top domain...

Here is what I use:

extension String {

    func isEmail() -> Bool {
        let emailRegEx = "^[a-zA-Z0-9_.+-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9-]+\\.[a-zA-Z0-9-.]+$"
        return NSPredicate(format:"SELF MATCHES %@", emailRegEx).evaluateWithObject(self)
    } 
}
  • completely wrong – Fattie Feb 18 at 14:12
0

Seems to work too...

let regex = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,}"

func validate(email: String) -> Bool {
    let matches = email.rangeOfString(regex, options: .RegularExpressionSearch)
    if let _ = matches {
        return true
    }
    return false
}
0

Updated answer @Arsonik answer to Swift 2.2, using less verbose code than other offered solutions:

extension String {
    func isValidEmail() -> Bool {
        let regex = try? NSRegularExpression(pattern: "^[a-zA-Z0-9.!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?(?:\\.[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?)*$", options: .CaseInsensitive)
        return regex?.firstMatchInString(self, options: [], range: NSMakeRange(0, self.characters.count)) != nil
    }
}
  • abcd@a is passing with this regex. You should fix it. – Gunhan Feb 16 '17 at 15:14
  • Note that NSRange length property should use String utf16.count instead of characters.count – Leo Dabus Feb 22 '18 at 18:54
0

@JeffersonBe's answer is close, but returns true if the string is "something containing someone@something.com a valid email" which is not what we want. The following is an extension on String that works well (and allows testing for valid phoneNumber and other data detectors to boot.

/// Helper for various data detector matches.
/// Returns `true` iff the `String` matches the data detector type for the complete string.
func matchesDataDetector(type: NSTextCheckingResult.CheckingType, scheme: String? = nil) -> Bool {
    let dataDetector = try? NSDataDetector(types: type.rawValue)
    guard let firstMatch = dataDetector?.firstMatch(in: self, options: NSRegularExpression.MatchingOptions.reportCompletion, range: NSRange(location: 0, length: length)) else {
        return false
    }
    return firstMatch.range.location != NSNotFound
        // make sure the entire string is an email, not just contains an email
        && firstMatch.range.location == 0
        && firstMatch.range.length == length
        // make sure the link type matches if link scheme
        && (type != .link || scheme == nil || firstMatch.url?.scheme == scheme)
}
/// `true` iff the `String` is an email address in the proper form.
var isEmail: Bool {
    return matchesDataDetector(type: .link, scheme: "mailto")
}
/// `true` iff the `String` is a phone number in the proper form.
var isPhoneNumber: Bool {
    return matchesDataDetector(type: .phoneNumber)
}
/// number of characters in the `String` (required for above).
var length: Int {
    return self.characters.count
}
  • Note that NSRange length property should use String utf16.count instead of characters.count – Leo Dabus Feb 22 '18 at 18:55
0

And for Swift 3:

extension String {
    func isValidEmail() -> Bool {
        let regex = try? NSRegularExpression(pattern: "^[a-zA-Z0-9.!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?(?:\\.[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?)*$", options: .caseInsensitive)
        return regex?.firstMatch(in: self, options: [], range: NSMakeRange(0, self.characters.count)) != nil
    }
}
  • Note that NSRange length property should use String utf16.count instead of characters.count – Leo Dabus Feb 22 '18 at 18:55
0

My only addition to the list of responses would be that for Linux, NSRegularExpression does not exist, it's actually RegularExpression

    func isEmail() -> Bool {

    let patternNormal = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,6}"

    #if os(Linux)
        let regex = try? RegularExpression(pattern: patternNormal, options: .caseInsensitive)
    #else
        let regex = try? NSRegularExpression(pattern: patternNormal, options: .caseInsensitive)
    #endif

    return regex?.firstMatch(in: self, options: [], range: NSMakeRange(0, self.characters.count)) != nil

This compiles successfully on both macOS & Ubuntu.

  • Note that NSRange length property should use String utf16.count instead of characters.count – Leo Dabus Feb 22 '18 at 18:55
0

Here is an extension in Swift 3

extension String {
    func isValidEmail() -> Bool {
        let emailRegex = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,64}"
        return NSPredicate(format: "SELF MATCHES %@", emailRegex).evaluate(with: self)
    }
}

Just use it like this:

if yourEmailString.isValidEmail() {
    //code for valid email address
} else {
    //code for not valid email address
}
  • Changing to use the Regex from alexcristea' answer, it's perfect solution. – ittgung Nov 30 '17 at 4:28
0
//Email validation
func validateEmail(enterEmail:String) -> Bool{
    let emailFormat = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,64}"
    let emailPredicate = NSPredicate(format:"SELF MATCHES %@",emailFormat)
    return emailPredicate.evaluate(with:enterEmail)
}

100% working and tested

  • 1
    failed if u write ".com" twice in the end. Check atleast very common cases before mentioning 100% working and TESTED – mAc Sep 13 '18 at 13:56
0

I like to create extension

   extension String {

func isValidateEmail() -> Bool {
    let emailFormat = "[A-Z0-9a-z._%+-]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,64}"
    let emailPredicate = NSPredicate(format:"SELF MATCHES %@", emailFormat)
    return emailPredicate.evaluate(with: self)
}

}

usage:

if emailid.text!.isValidateEmail() == false(){
 //do what ever you want if string is not matched.

}
0

I improved @Azik answer. I allow more special characters which are allowed by guidelines, as well as return a few extra edge cases as invalid.

The group think going on here to only allow ._%+- in the local part is not correct per guidelines. See @Anton Gogolev answer on this question or see below:

The local-part of the email address may use any of these ASCII characters:

  • uppercase and lowercase Latin letters A to Z and a to z;

  • digits 0 to 9;

  • special characters !#$%&'*+-/=?^_`{|}~;

  • dot ., provided that it is not the first or last character unless quoted, and provided also that it does not appear consecutively unless quoted (e.g. John..Doe@example.com is not allowed but "John..Doe"@example.com is allowed);

  • space and "(),:;<>@[\] characters are allowed with restrictions (they are only allowed inside a quoted string, as described in the paragraph below, and in addition, a backslash or double-quote must be preceded by a backslash); comments are allowed

  • with parentheses at either end of the local-part; e.g. john.smith(comment)@example.com and (comment)john.smith@example.com are both equivalent to john.smith@example.com;

The code I use will not allow restricted out of place special characters, but will allow many more options than the majority of answers here. I would prefer more relaxed validation to error on the side of caution.

if enteredText.contains("..") || enteredText.contains("@@") 
   || enteredText.hasPrefix(".") || enteredText.hasSuffix(".con"){
       return false
}

let emailFormat = "[A-Z0-9a-z.!#$%&'*+-/=?^_`{|}~]+@[A-Za-z0-9.-]+\\.[A-Za-z]{2,64}"
let emailPredicate = NSPredicate(format:"SELF MATCHES %@", emailFormat)     
return emailPredicate.evaluate(with: enteredText)
0

For anyone who is still looking for an answer to this, please have a look at the following framework;

ATGValidator

It is a rule based validation framework, which handles most of the validations out of box. And top it all, it has form validator which supports validation of multiple textfields at the same time.

For validating an email string, use the following;

"abcd.hhs@some.com".satisfyAll(rules: [StringRegexRule.email]).status

If you want to validate an email from textfield, try below code;

textfield.validationRules = [StringRegexRule.email]
textfield.validationHandler = { result in
    // This block will be executed with relevant result whenever validation is done.
    print(result.status, result.errors)
}
// Below line is to manually trigger validation.
textfield.validateTextField()

If you want to validate it while typing in textfield or when focus is changed to another field, add one of the following lines;

textfield.validateOnInputChange(true)
// or
textfield.validateOnFocusLoss(true)

Please check the readme file at the link for more use cases.

0

Swift 5 Email Validator - Regular Expression

This kind of implementation has its features that you can use in very simple way as String extension, great validation and is a complete verification of RFC 2822.

Step 1) File -> New -> File... -> Swift File and copy this code:

import Foundation

extension String {

    // Checks if the `String` is a valid email address.
    func isValidEmailAddress() -> Bool {
        let emailRegEx = "(?:[a-zA-Z0-9!#$%\\&‘*+/=?\\^_`{|}~-]+(?:\\.[a-zA-Z0-9!#$%\\&'*+/=?\\^_`{|}"
            + "~-]+)*|\"(?:[\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x21\\x23-\\x5b\\x5d-\\"
            + "x7f]|\\\\[\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x7f])*\")@(?:(?:[a-z0-9](?:[a-"
            + "z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?\\.)+[a-z0-9](?:[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9])?|\\[(?:(?:25[0-5"
            + "]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\\.){3}(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-"
            + "9][0-9]?|[a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]:(?:[\\x01-\\x08\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x1f\\x21"
            + "-\\x5a\\x53-\\x7f]|\\\\[\\x01-\\x09\\x0b\\x0c\\x0e-\\x7f])+)\\])"

        let emailTest = NSPredicate(format: "SELF MATCHES[c] %@", emailRegEx)
        return emailTest.evaluate(with: self)
    }
}

Step 2) Use of email validator as string extesion:

@IBAction func sendEmail(_ sender: Any) {
    if let textFieldText = emailTextField.text, textFieldText.isValidEmailAddress() {
        // APICall or present next desired view controller
    } else {
        // Present an alert to tell user that is invalid email
    }
}

Examples:

  • doc@mail.com -> valid
  • doc@mail.com.au -> valid
  • doc@.com -> invalid
  • doc@com -> invalid
  • doc.com -> invalid

Source: GitHub link

protected by Maxim Shoustin Jan 27 '17 at 11:06

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