Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Suppose I have two computations which could use the same intermediate result. If I wrote an imperative program, I would pass the same (relatively) "global" state to both functions, to be more efficient.

When writing functional code, I would use a function that computes the intermediate value as part of both functions which need that value. Should I be expecting my compiler to optimize that function call, or is there a more intelligent way for me to design the program?

To clarify, here's an example.

Let's say I have a function to compute some property a after a long and tedious computation. From a, I need to calculate two other properties b and c. For eg: b = a^2 and c = a^7 + a^(1/7). Now, as part of my main program, I invoke the functions to compute b and c. Will the computation to find a be done exactly once and the result reused, or will a be computed multiple times?

Ps: In case it's relevant, I'm learning Haskell.

share|improve this question
    
Hmm, I'm afraid I don't follow. Especially the part about passing a function to an intermediate value (which you're saying is analogous to the intermediate value in the imperative program you were talking about in the first paragraph). Could you post a concrete example? – David Young Aug 24 '14 at 17:27
    
Haskell is lazy, so it will typically create those "intermediate" results by itself. – Bartek Banachewicz Aug 24 '14 at 17:37
2  
There's no problem applying multiple functions to the same value, and the value will only be calculated once. – AndrewC Aug 24 '14 at 20:45
    
I've added a concrete example. Does that help, or is it still too broad? – Siva Aug 25 '14 at 2:04
    
@AndrewC: Wrt my example, the compiler will compute $a$ only once, rather than once each while computing $b$ and $c$? – Siva Aug 25 '14 at 2:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Suppose I have two computations which could use the same intermediate result. If I wrote an imperative program, I would pass the same (relatively) "global" state to both functions, to be more efficient.

When writing functional code, I would use a function that computes the intermediate value as part of both functions which need that value. Should I be expecting my compiler to optimize that function call, or is there a more intelligent way for me to design the program?

So to be concrete, you have two functions which both compute the same thing as part of a sub-computation. E.g.

f x = y + 3
   where
      y = x ^ 2

g x = y * 7
   where
      y = x ^ 2

z = f 2 + g 2

So you want to "float out" the common subexpression, x ^ 2, and share it.

This is "common subexpression elimination". It is an optimization a compiler can performn, or something you can do by hand. GHC, a Haskell compiler, will do CSE in some cases. In other cases, you can do it by hand by naming the intermediate computation explicitly.

It's better when the compiler does it.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool! Thanks for the links. – Siva Sep 1 '14 at 18:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.