3
#include <iostream.h>
#include <math.h>
int main()
{
    int j=2;
    int output;
    output=pow(10,j);
    cout<<output;
    return 0;
}

I wrote above code to gcc 12 compiler and got the output 99 instead 100. I don't get the valid reason while searching on various sites. Is there any compiler problem?

  • 2
    <iostream.h> is non standard – quantdev Aug 24 '14 at 17:30
  • 1
    Switch on your compiler warnings. And get a standards compliant compiler. – juanchopanza Aug 24 '14 at 17:30
  • 2
    I get 100 for int(pow(10, 2)) w/ GCC on Linux/x86-64. – Fred Foo Aug 24 '14 at 17:31
  • 2
    Perhaps this may help – WhozCraig Aug 24 '14 at 17:34
  • 4
    Why oh why do people use pow() to square an int ? – Paul R Aug 24 '14 at 17:36
8

Because of integer truncation. pow() returns a floating point value, and due to floating point arithmetic, it is probably ~ 99.999...; however, due to integer truncation, even 99.999... gets truncated down to 99.

  • 1
    This is most likely the case, and so in this situation to get the more 'correct' integer you could round the result from pow(). int result = pow(10^2) + 0.5; would do it. – rsethc Aug 24 '14 at 17:34
  • 3
    @rsethc, That method of rounding has problems. Just use std::round. – chris Aug 24 '14 at 17:41
  • Eh, care to give an example? Has always worked for me. – rsethc Aug 24 '14 at 18:58
  • 2
    I got pow(10,2)=100 but in case i declare j=2 and then upon evaluating pow(10,j) i got 99. Why is it so then if it returns only floating point value, it must stick to same answer in both case? – Alok Kumar Maurya Aug 24 '14 at 20:23

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