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Learn You a Haskell demonstrates the powerset function:

The powerset of some set is a set of all subsets of that set.

powerset :: [a] -> [[a]]  
powerset xs = filterM (\x -> [True, False]) xs

And running it:

ghci> powerset [1,2,3]                    
[[1,2,3],[1,2],[1,3],[1],[2,3],[2],[3],[]]

What's going on here? I see filterM's signature (shown below), but I don't understand how it's executing.

filterM :: Monad m => (a -> m Bool) -> [a] -> m [a]

Please walk me through this powerset function.

  • 8
    Perhaps you should try a little yourself? What is m in this example? What does filterM turn into if you expand the monadic operations? – augustss Aug 24 '14 at 21:01
  • 9
    byorgey.wordpress.com/2007/06/26/… – DaoWen Aug 24 '14 at 21:02
  • 2
    good point @augustss. good link, DaoWen. I'm going to try to implement filterM now. – Kevin Meredith Aug 24 '14 at 21:04
  • 1
    there's a discussion about this on reddit. – Will Ness Aug 28 '14 at 8:43
9
powerset ::                                    [a] -> [[a]]  
powerset xs = filterM (\x -> [True, False])    xs
                             -------------            -----
filterM :: Monad m => (a  -> m Bool       ) -> [a] -> m [a]
-- filter  ::         (a ->    Bool       ) -> [a] ->   [a]   (just for comparison)
                             -------------            -----
                             m Bool ~ [Bool]          m ~ []

So this is filter "in" the nondeterminism (list) monad.

Normally, filter keeps only those elements in its input list for which the predicate holds.

Nondeterministically, we get all the possibilities of keeping the elements for which the nondeterministic predicate might hold, and removing those for which it might not hold. Here, it is so for any element, so we get all the possibilities of keeping, or removing, an element.

Which is a powerset.


Another example (in a different monad), building on the one in Brent Yorgey's blog post mentioned in the comments,

  >> filterM (\x-> if even x then Just True else Nothing) [2,4..8]
Just [2,4,6,8]
  >> filterM (\x-> if even x then Just True else Nothing) [2..8]
Nothing
  >> filterM (\x-> if even x then Just True else Just False) [2..8]
Just [2,4,6,8]

Let's see how this is actually achieved, with code. We'll define

filter_M :: Monad m => (a -> m Bool) -> [a] -> m [a]
filter_M p []     = return []
filter_M p (x:xs) = p x >>= (\b ->
                if b
                    then filter_M p xs >>= (return . (x:))
                    else filter_M p xs )

Writing out the list monad's definitions for return and bind (>>=) (i.e. return x = [x], xs >>= f = concatMap f xs), this becomes

filter_L :: (a -> [Bool]) -> [a] -> [[a]]
filter_L p [] = [[]]
filter_L p (x:xs) -- = (`concatMap` p x) (\b->
                  --     (if b then map (x:) else id) $ filter_L p xs )
                  -- which is semantically the same as
                  --     map (if b then (x:) else id) $ ... 
   = [ if b then x:r else r | b <- p x, r <- filter_L p xs ]

Hence,

-- powerset = filter_L    (\_ -> [True, False])
--            filter_L :: (a  -> [Bool]       ) -> [a] -> [[a]]
powerset :: [a] -> [[a]]
powerset [] = [[]]
powerset (x:xs) 
   = [ if b then x:r else r | b <- (\_ -> [True, False]) x, r <- powerset xs ]
   = [ if b then x:r else r | b <- [True, False], r <- powerset xs ]
   = map (x:) (powerset xs) ++ powerset xs    -- (1)
   -- or, with different ordering of the results:
   = [ if b then x:r else r | r <- powerset xs, b <- [True, False] ]
   = powerset xs >>= (\r-> [True,False] >>= (\b-> [x:r|b] ++ [r|not b]))
   = powerset xs >>= (\r-> [x:r,r])
   = concatMap (\r-> [x:r,r]) (powerset xs)   -- (2)
   = concat [ [x:r,r] | r <- powerset xs  ]
   = [ s | r <- powerset xs, s <- [x:r,r] ]

and we have thus derived the two usual implementations of powerset function.

The flipped order of processing is made possible by the fact that the predicate is constant (const [True, False]). Otherwise the test would be evaluated over and over again for the same input value, and we probably wouldn't want that.

  • so how exactly does passing in \x -> [True, False] mean "show all possibilities of this list, i.e. powerset? – Kevin Meredith Aug 27 '14 at 0:19
  • no. "show all possibilities of" is how the nondetermnism monad operates. It is achieved by defining join xss = concat xss, i.e. defining xs >>= f = concatMap f xs. Any singleton list represents a nondeterministic entity with one possible value. A two-elements list represents a non-deterministic entity with two possible values. In "true" nondeterminism we imagine it holding these values simultaneously; in real computers this may be implemented by two values which are explored sequentially, i.e. a list. Which is the same, in Prolog. – Will Ness Aug 27 '14 at 6:48
  • and an empty list represents no possible values. That's what the title of that famous paper by P. Wadler alludes to, "How to replace failure by a list of successes" - each element of a list represents successful computation of that value, so empty list represents a failure to compute any values. (the "pattern matching" terminology in that paper refers to parsing, not pattern matching as in Haskell). – Will Ness Aug 27 '14 at 6:49
  • Watch out! The definition you give for filter_M looks like it has a serious efficiency problem in the list monad. Specifically, I don't think common tails are shared. What you want, I think, is let rest=filter_M p xs in p x >>= (\b -> ...). Now it's possible that compiler optimizations might be able to save you, but I wouldn't want to count on that. – dfeuer Aug 28 '14 at 15:26
  • @dfeuer on the other hand sometimes it might be better to recalculate than to memoize, esp. when the list is very large. That's why I wrote version (1) of powerset that way. – Will Ness Aug 28 '14 at 20:21
5

let me help you about this:

  • first: you have to understand the list monad. If you remember, we have:

    do
      n  <- [1,2]  
      ch <- ['a','b']  
      return (n,ch)
    

    The result will be: [(1,'a'),(1,'b'),(2,'a'),(2,'b')]

    Because: xs >>= f = concat (map f xs) and return x = [x]

    n=1: concat (map (\ch -> return (n,ch)) ['a', 'b'])
         concat ([ [(1,'a')], [(1,'b')] ]
         [(1,'a'),(1,'b')]
    and so forth ...
    the outermost result will be:
         concat ([ [(1,'a'),(1,'b')], [(2,'a'),(2,'b')] ])
         [(1,'a'),(1,'b'),(2,'a'),(2,'b')]
    
  • second: we have the implementation of filterM:

    filterM _ []     =  return []
    filterM p (x:xs) =  do
        flg <- p x
        ys  <- filterM p xs
        return (if flg then x:ys else ys)
    

    Let do an example for you to grasp the idea easier:

    filterM (\x -> [True, False]) [1,2,3]
    p is the lambda function and (x:xs) is [1,2,3]
    

    The innermost recursion of filterM: x = 3

    do
      flg <- [True, False]
      ys  <- [ [] ]
      return (if flg then 3:ys else ys)
    

    You see the similarity, like the example above we have:

    flg=True: concat (map (\ys -> return (if flg then 3:ys else ys)) [ [] ])
              concat ([ return 3:[] ])
              concat ([ [ [3] ] ])
              [ [3] ]
    and so forth ...
    the final result: [ [3], [] ]
    

    Likewise:

    x=2:
      do
        flg <- [True, False]
        ys  <- [ [3], [] ]
        return (if flg then 2:ys else ys)
    result: [ [2,3], [2], [3], [] ]
    x=1:
      do
        flg <- [True, False]
        ys  <- [ [2,3], [2], [3], [] ]
        return (if flg then 1:ys else ys)
    result: [ [1,2,3], [1,2], [1,3], [1], [2,3], [2], [3], [] ]
    
  • theoretically: it's just chaining list monads after all:

    filterM :: (a -> m Bool) -> [a] -> m [a]
               (a -> [Bool]) -> [a] -> [ [a] ]
    

And that's all, hope you enjoy :D

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