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I want to get UIImage Object real memory size. There are 3 methods

NSUInteger s1 = UIImagePNGRepresentation(thumbImage).length;
NSUInteger s2 = UIImageJPEGRepresentation(thumbImage, 1).length;
NSUInteger s3  = CGImageGetHeight(thumbImage.CGImage) * CGImageGetBytesPerRow(thumbImage.CGImage);
NSLog(@"s1:%u",s1);
NSLog(@"s2:%u",s2);
NSLog(@"s3:%u",s3);

and result

s1:62734

s2:175939

s3:578816

which one is right?

1

1 Answer 1

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The last one (s3) is correct:

  • s1 is the size of a .png image when saved to a file
  • s2 is the size of a .jpg image when save to a file with best quality
4
  • but why jpg size bigger than png size when saved to a file,It should be opposite in normal. Aug 26, 2014 at 2:48
  • 4
    You can trade jpg file size for image quality. The UIImageJPEGRepresentation compressionQuality parameter determines the amount of compression, and can range from 0 to 1. In the code example the jpg representation has a quality setting of 1, or maximum quality, which will result in the largest jpg file. PNG is a lossless compression, and depending on the image, may yield a smaller file size than a "high quality" jpg file.
    – bobnoble
    Aug 27, 2014 at 0:31
  • 1
    @bobnoble why are memory and disk sizes different?
    – onmyway133
    Jun 23, 2016 at 7:44
  • 2
    @onmyway133 Size in memory is based on the size (width and height) and depth (bytes per pixel) of the photo. In-memory photos are not compressed as jpeg or png photos are on disk.
    – bobnoble
    Jun 25, 2016 at 14:57

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