7

I am following the go tour on their official website and I have been asked to write a Fibonacci generator. Here it is:

 package main

import "fmt"

// fibonacci is a function that returns
// a function that returns an int.
func fibonacci() func() int {
    first := 0
    second := 0
    return func() int{
        if(first == 0) {
         first = 1
         second = 1
         return 0
        }else {
            current := first   
            firstc := second
            second = first + second
            first = firstc
            return current
        }



    }
}

func main() {
    f := fibonacci()
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        fmt.Println(f())
    }
}

It works. However I consider it very ugly and I'm sure there has to be a better solution. I have been thinking about posting this on the code-review however since I'm asking for a better approach I thought this is the right place to post it.

Is there a better way to write this code?

Here is the task:

Implement a fibonacci function that returns a function (a closure) that returns successive fibonacci numbers.

27

My favorite clean way to implement iterating through the Fibonacci numbers is to use first as fi - 1, and second as fi. The Fibonacci equation states that:

fi + 1 = fi + fi - 1

Except when we write this in code, in the next round we're incrementing i. So we're effectively doing:

fnext i = fcurrent i + fcurrent i - 1

and

fnext i - 1 = fcurrent i - 1

The way I like to implement this in code is:

first, second = second, first + second

The first = second part corresponds to updating fnext i - 1 = fcurrent i - 1, and the second = first + second part corresponds to updating fnext i = fcurrent i + fcurrent i - 1.

Then all we have left to do is return the old value of first, so we'll store it in a temp variable out of the way before doing the update. In total, we get:

// fibonacci returns a function that returns
// successive fibonacci numbers from each
// successive call
func fibonacci() func() int {
    first, second := 0, 1
    return func() int {
        ret := first
        first, second = second, first+second
        return ret
    }
}

See it in action on the Go Playground.

4

I would make use of multiple assignment, reduce the length of identifiers, and remove that if statment:

func fibonacci() func() int {
    var a, b int
    b = 1
    return func() int {
        ret := a
        a, b = b, a+b
        return ret
    }
}
1

Another approach

func fibonacci() func() int {
    n1, n := -1, 1
    return func() int {
        n1, n = n, n1+n
        return n
    }
}

The Go Playground

0
package main

import "fmt"

// fibonacci is a function that returns
// a function that returns an int.
func fibonacci() func() int {
    a, b, sum := 1, 1, 0
    return func() int {
        a,b = b,sum
        sum = a + b
        return b
    }
}

func main() {
    f := fibonacci()
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        fmt.Println(f())
    }
}
0

Besides the already provided answers you could also use a defer function for it:

package main

import "fmt"

// fibonacci is a function that returns
// a function that returns an int.
func fibonacci() func() int {
    secondLast := 0
    last := 1
    return func() int {
        defer func() {
            secondLast, last = last, secondLast+last
        }()
        return secondLast
    }
}

func main() {
    f := fibonacci()
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        fmt.Println(f())
    }
}

Go Playground

But i guess jwoodalls answers is the most performant one.

Edit: But if you wanna use unsigned integers (to show off how many fibonacci numbers you can compute on your architecture ;) ) you would have to use either the approach with the variable holding the return value or the defer function.

package main

import "fmt"

// fibonacci is a function that returns
// a function that returns an uint.
func fibonacci() func() uint {
    var secondLast uint
    var last uint = 1
    return func() uint {
        defer func() {
            secondLast, last = last, secondLast + last
        }()
        return secondLast
    }
}

func main() {
    f := fibonacci()
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        fmt.Println(f())
    }
}

Go Playground

EditEdit: Or even better: use float64!!!

package main

import "fmt"

// fibonacci is a function that returns
// a function that returns an float64.
func fibonacci() func() float64 {
    var secondLast float64
    var last float64 = 1
    return func() float64 {
        defer func() {
            secondLast, last = last, secondLast+last
        }()
        return secondLast
    }
}

func main() {
    f := fibonacci()
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        fmt.Println(f())
    }
}

Go Playground

-1
package main

import "fmt"

// fibonacci is a function that returns
// a function that returns an int.
func fibonacci() func() int {
    first:=0
    second:=0
    return func() int{
        if second == 0 {
            second = 1
        } else if first == 0 {
            first = 1
        } else {
            first, second = second, first + second
        }
        return second
    }
}

func main() {
    f := fibonacci()
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        fmt.Println(f())
    }
}

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