38

In C#, if I create a class with no namespace, what namespace will I use when trying to instantiate the class?

For example, assume main is...

namespace NamespaceTests
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

        }
    }
}

... and assume my namespace-less class is ...

public class test
{
    public string SayHello()
    {
        return "Hello World!";
    }
}

... and assume I have another class by the same name, but having the default namespace...

namespace NamespaceTests
{
    public class test
    {
        public string SayHello()
        {
            return "Hello Moon...";
        }
    }
}

... how would I modify main to include an instance of the namespace-less class and call 'SayHello' to retrieve the message "Hello World!"? Specifically, how would I fully qualify the namespace-less instance of class 'test', especially considering I may have another class also called 'test' but having a namespace, so I need to distinguish...

43

It's in the global namespace and can be referenced like this:

var x = new global::test();

  • 1
    Thanks David - example worked perfect. Your answer was 10 seconds before @itsme86 - award to you sir. +1 for example... – barrypicker Aug 25 '14 at 17:51
  • This solved an ambiguous reference due to a class named the same. One had a namespace and one didn't. It was attempting to call the one with the namespace and getting an exception: error CS0117: 'System.Web.Mvc.HtmlHelperExtensions' does not contain a definition for 'RenderPartialViewToString – GarDavis Jul 22 '15 at 15:55
11

Types not defined within a namespace will be in the global namespace.

The global contextual keyword, when it comes before the :: operator, refers to the global namespace, which is the default namespace for any C# program and is otherwise unnamed.

The following example shows how to use the global contextual keyword to specify that the class TestApp is defined in the global namespace:

C# class TestClass : global::TestApp { }

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