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Rails documentation provides a nice explanation of how to handle a self join where only a has_many-belongs_to relationship is required. In the example, an employee (as a manager) can have many employees (each, as a subordinate).

However, how do you handle a has_many-has_many self join (which I've heard referred to as a bi-directional looped association)?

For example, how do you handle the situation in which an employee can have many subordinates, in its capacity as manager, and also have many managers, in its capacity as subordinate?

Or, in other words, where a user can follow many users and be followed by many users?

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1 Answer 1

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A User can have many:

  • followers in its capacity as followee
  • followees in its capacity as follower.

Here's how the code for user.rb might look:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  # follower_follows "names" the Follow join table for accessing through the follower association
  has_many :follower_follows, foreign_key: :followee_id, class_name: "Follow" 
  # source: :follower matches with the belong_to :follower identification in the Follow model 
  has_many :followers, through: :follower_follows, source: :follower

  # followee_follows "names" the Follow join table for accessing through the followee association
  has_many :followee_follows, foreign_key: :follower_id, class_name: "Follow"    
  # source: :followee matches with the belong_to :followee identification in the Follow model   
  has_many :followees, through: :followee_follows, source: :followee
end

Here's how the code for follow.rb:

class Follow < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :follower, foreign_key: "follower_id", class_name: "User"
  belongs_to :followee, foreign_key: "followee_id", class_name: "User"
end

The most important things to note are probably the terms :follower_follows and :followee_follows in user.rb. To use a run of the mill (non-looped) association as an example, a Team may have many :players through :contracts. This is no different for a Player, who may have many :teams through :contracts as well (over the course of such Player's career).

But in this case, where only one named model exists (i.e. a User), naming the through: relationship identically (e.g. through: :follow) would result in a naming collision for different use cases of (or access points into) the join table. :follower_follows and :followee_follows were created to avoid such a naming collision.

Now, a User can have many :followers through :follower_follows and many :followees through :followee_follows:

  • To determine a User’s :followees (upon an @user.followees call to the database), Rails may now look at each instance of class_name: “Follow” where such User is the the follower (i.e. foreign_key: :follower_id) through: such User’s :followee_follows.
  • To determine a User’s :followers (upon an @user.followers call to the database), Rails may now look at each instance of class_name: “Follow” where such User is the the followee (i.e. foreign_key: :followee_id) through: such User’s :follower_follows.
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  • that's a nice answer, but what if he needs an isotropic connection? Aug 25, 2014 at 20:53
  • Thanks @MarianTheisen. I'm not sure I understand the question. In this situation, followers and followees are totally independent groups of users. There can be between zero and 100% overlap between the groups. Are you talking about a situation in which 100% overlap is a requirement of the self join table connecting users?
    – jbmilgrom
    Aug 26, 2014 at 12:59
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    Sorry, I meant to say...He talks about both the scenario where you do not need additional fields ("uni-directional, no additional fields") in the join table and where you do ("Uni-directional, with additional fields").
    – jbmilgrom
    Aug 26, 2014 at 14:49
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    This can be contrasted with the bi-directional case, in which the through: associations need to be named differently (i.e. through: :followee_follows and through: :follower_follows) than the join model (i.e. Follow) to account for the bi-directional nature of the association
    – jbmilgrom
    Aug 26, 2014 at 15:02
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    See my blog post for a more complete discussion
    – jbmilgrom
    Feb 27, 2015 at 17:33

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