77

I'm using Flask for developing a website and while in development I run flask using the following file:

#!/usr/bin/env python
from datetime import datetime
from app import app
import config

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print '################### Restarting @', datetime.utcnow(), '###################'
    app.run(port=4004, debug=config.DEBUG, host='0.0.0.0')

When I start the server, or when it auto-restarts because files have been updated, it always shows the print line twice:

################### Restarting @ 2014-08-26 10:51:49.167062 ###################
################### Restarting @ 2014-08-26 10:51:49.607096 ###################

Although it is not really a problem (the rest works as expected), I simply wonder why it behaves like this? Any ideas?

112

The Werkzeug reloader spawns a child process so that it can restart that process each time your code changes. Werkzeug is the library that supplies Flask with the development server when you call app.run().

See the restart_with_reloader() function code; your script is run again with subprocess.call().

If you set use_reloader to False you'll see the behaviour go away, but then you also lose the reloading functionality:

app.run(port=4004, debug=config.DEBUG, host='0.0.0.0', use_reloader=False)

You can disable the reloader when using the flask run command too:

FLASK_DEBUG=1 flask run --no-reload

You can look for the WERKZEUG_RUN_MAIN environment variable if you wanted to detect when you are in the reloading child process:

import os
if os.environ.get('WERKZEUG_RUN_MAIN') == 'true':
    print '################### Restarting @ {} ###################'.format(
        datetime.utcnow())

However, if you need to set up module globals, then you should instead use the @app.before_first_request decorator on a function and have that function set up such globals. It'll be called just once after every reload when the first request comes in:

@app.before_first_request
def before_first_request():
    print '########### Restarted, first request @ {} ############'.format(
        datetime.utcnow())

Do take into account that if you run this in a full-scale WSGI server that uses forking or new subprocesses to handle requests, that before_first_request handlers may be invoked for each new subprocess.

  • 1
    Ah ok. Thanks for the explanation! So its considered normal behaviour? At least good that nothing's wrong with my code.. :) – kramer65 Aug 26 '14 at 11:06
  • 1
    @kramer65: it is entirely normal and expected behaviour. :-) – Martijn Pieters Aug 26 '14 at 11:09
  • 1
    Is there a practical way to run slow initialisation code just once, ensuring that it also gets called when running under wsgi (ie. not from app.run), but not waiting for the first request? I don't want that first request to be burdened with the initialisation cost. – Kylotan Jun 9 '15 at 8:49
  • 1
    @Kylotan: you'd have to inspect the environment; if you only set DEBUG when running in development, you could look for the WERKZEUG_RUN_MAIN environment variable and only run your code when DEBUG is false or WERKZEUG_RUN_MAIN is set, for example. Gets a bit tedious. – Martijn Pieters Jun 9 '15 at 8:54
  • Just to clarify, I thought "reloading functionality" meant reactivity (which would defeat the whole purpose of using dash for me). For any other noobs like myself, this only means the functionality in which editing/saving the file triggers a live update. – Hendy Sep 20 '17 at 21:27
8

If you are using the modern flask run command, none of the options to app.run are used. To disable the reloader completely, pass --no-reload:

FLASK_DEBUG=1 flask run --no-reload

Also, __name__ == '__main__' will never be true because the app isn't executed directly. Use the same ideas from Martijn's answer, except without the __main__ block.

if os.environ.get('WERKZEUG_RUN_MAIN') != 'true':
    # do something only once, before the reloader

if os.environ.get('WERKZEUG_RUN_MAIN') == 'true':
    # do something each reload
6

I had the same issue, and I solved it by setting app.debug to False. Setting it to True was causing my __name__ == "__main__" to be called twice.

(I would have posted this as a comment, but I don't have enough rep. Posted as answer in hopes it would help someone else)

  • My __main__ still runs twice with both app.debug = False and app.run_server(debug=False). Are you sure that did it for you, or could you post some reproducible code to try? – Hendy Sep 20 '17 at 19:55
  • Changing app.debug was all I did to solve it for me. Can you confirm that main is only running twice when the flask server is started? Try getting a minimal working example running and see if the issue occurs. Also try running a minimal example that fails in multiple python versions, that may have been an issue. I have since migrated my project to Java and SparkJava instead of python and flask, so I don't remember exactly what fixed the issue. – Carvell Wakeman Sep 23 '17 at 17:33
  • I'm using flask via plotly dash, and found out they recently changed the default debug argument passed to flask. I'm going to guess that I was mistaken above and perhaps did app.debug=False (which maybe is overridden by the default args to run_server), or only tried without passing True, not explicitly setting as shown above. This is working correctly for me now (making sure that debug=False). Thanks! – Hendy Sep 24 '17 at 22:26
  • This fixed the problem. – midtownguru May 8 '18 at 1:09
0

I had the same issue. I solved it by modifying my main and inserting use_reloader=False into it. If any body is here looking for a workaround for this problem then below code will get you started, however you will the functionality of changes in code being detected automatically by and restarting the application will not work. You will have to manually stop and restart you application after each edit in code.

if __name__ == '__main__':
app.run(debug=True,use_reloader=False)

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