16

Possible Duplicate:
Casting vs using the ‘as’ keyword in the CLR

Which method is regarded as best practice?

Cast first?

public string Describe(ICola cola)
{
    var coke = cola as CocaCola;
    if (coke != null)
    {
        string result;
        // some unique coca-cola only code here.
        return result;
    }
    var pepsi = cola as Pepsi;
    if (pepsi != null)
    {
        string result;
        // some unique pepsi only code here.
        return result;
    }
}

Or should I check first, cast later?

public string Describe(ICola cola)
{
    if (cola is CocaCola)
    {
        var coke = (CocaCola) cola;
        string result;
        // some unique coca-cola only code here.
        return result;
    }
    if (cola is Pepsi)
    {
        var pepsi = (Pepsi) cola;
        string result;
        // some unique pepsi only code here.
        return result;
    }
}

Can you see any other way to do this?

marked as duplicate by nawfal, Kate Gregory, Leniel Maccaferri, Code-Apprentice, Jon Egerton Feb 4 '13 at 0:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

19

If the object may or may not be of the type you want then the as operator (your first method) is better in two ways:

  • Readability and ease of maintenance: you are only specifying the type once
  • Performance: you are only performing the cast once, instead of twice. (Trivia: when you use the is keyword, the C# compiler internally translates it to as, ie. coke is Cola is equivalent to (coke as Cola) != null)

If the object should always be of the requested type then just do (Coke)cola and let it throw an exception if that's not the case.

7

The first (casting first via as) is slightly more efficient, so in that regard, it ~might~ be a best practice.

However, the code above, in general, displays a bit of "code smell". I'd consider refactoring any code that follows this pattern, if possible. Have ICola provide a describe method, and let it describe itself. This avoids the type checks and duplicated code...

  • Agree about the code smell - from the example this looks like a problem that could be better solved by polymorphism rather than by wildly casting objects about. – Timo Geusch Mar 31 '10 at 5:59
  • I agree with the code smell. In this case however, I don't want methods in my view permeating my Cola objects. – jamesrom Mar 31 '10 at 23:06
  • 1
    @jamesrom: Well, I did try to answer your question, first, before mentioning that (as is faster). However, I would really think about how you could eliminate the duplicated code- can your View pass in a delegate to handle the "specific" code more efficiently, maybe? – Reed Copsey Mar 31 '10 at 23:09
  • I came here to learn about similar problems I was having. I do not understand how to do this ICola code sniffing, and I don't know what to google search on. What is this called, and how would one implement it? – jp2code Jun 20 '12 at 18:33
4

This example uses a local parameter which is safe, but many times the type check is applied to fields (member variables) of a class. In which case "as"-then-check is safe, but "is"-then-cast creates a gratuitous race condition.

3

I think it's more efficient 1st way: Cast and then check, but...

Lots of time you develop for developers, and in my opinion, it's much more readable checking first and then casting...

  • good point........... – nawfal Feb 3 '13 at 20:11
1

Let me just put it out there. But I think neither is right :) In your particular example, why have an interface at all then? I would put a "Describe" method on your ICola interface, then implement the describe logic in your CocaCola and Pepsi classes that implement the interface.

So basically put that // some unique <some cola> only code here. into the implementing classes.

But to answer your question, I think check-then-cast is more appropriate.

  • That is what I would do if I could. But say, for example, that I didn't want my view logic permeating my Cola objects. – jamesrom Mar 31 '10 at 23:12
  • In that case, use some decorator or visitor-based solution for example, anything is better than manually inspecting the runtime-type of objects. I even think view logic would be less evil than casting and switching on types all over the place. – sara Feb 5 '16 at 10:07

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