86

For testing purposes, I'm trying to add a socket factory to my okHttp client that trusts everything while a proxy is set. This has been done many times over, but my implementation of a trusting socket factory seems to be missing something:

class TrustEveryoneManager implements X509TrustManager {
    @Override
    public void checkClientTrusted(java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException { }

    @Override
    public void checkServerTrusted(java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException { }

    @Override
    public java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
        return null;
    }
}
OkHttpClient client = new OkHttpClient();

final InetAddress ipAddress = InetAddress.getByName("XX.XXX.XXX.XXX"); // some IP
client.setProxy(new Proxy(Proxy.Type.HTTP, new InetSocketAddress(ipAddress, 8888)));

SSLContext sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
TrustManager[] trustManagers = new TrustManager[]{new TrustEveryoneManager()};
sslContext.init(null, trustManagers, null);
client.setSslSocketFactory(sslContext.getSocketFactory);

No requests are being sent out of my app and no exceptions are getting logged so it seems that it's failing silently within okHttp. Upon further investigation, it seems that there is an Exception being swallowed up in okHttp's Connection.upgradeToTls() when the handshake is being forced. The exception I'm being given is: javax.net.ssl.SSLException: SSL handshake terminated: ssl=0x74b522b0: SSL_ERROR_ZERO_RETURN occurred. You should never see this.

The following code produces an SSLContext which works like a charm in creating an SSLSocketFactory that doesn't throw any exceptions:

protected SSLContext getTrustingSslContext() throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, KeyStoreException, KeyManagementException {
    final SSLContextBuilder trustingSSLContextBuilder = SSLContexts.custom()
            .loadTrustMaterial(null, new TrustStrategy() {
                @Override
                public boolean isTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
                    return true; // Accepts any ssl cert whether valid or not.
                }
            });
    return trustingSSLContextBuilder.build();
}

The issue is that I'm trying to remove all Apache HttpClient dependencies from my app completely. The underlying code with Apache HttpClient to produce the SSLContext seems straightforward enough, but I'm obviously missing something as I cannot configure my SSLContext to match this.

Would anyone be able to produce an SSLContext implementation which does what I'd like without using Apache HttpClient?

  • 2
    "For testing purposes, I'm trying to add a socket factory to my okHttp client that trusts everything" -- what makes you think that this is a good idea in the first place? – CommonsWare Aug 26 '14 at 15:33
  • 1
    It only gets called on a network I trust entirely. – seato Aug 26 '14 at 15:38
  • This causes a java.net.SocketTimeoutException: Read timed out – IgorGanapolsky Oct 23 '15 at 16:41
195

Just in case anyone falls here, the (only) solution that worked for me is creating the OkHttpClient like explained here.

Here is the code:

private static OkHttpClient getUnsafeOkHttpClient() {
  try {
    // Create a trust manager that does not validate certificate chains
    final TrustManager[] trustAllCerts = new TrustManager[] {
        new X509TrustManager() {
          @Override
          public void checkClientTrusted(java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
          }

          @Override
          public void checkServerTrusted(java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
          }

          @Override
          public java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
            return new java.security.cert.X509Certificate[]{};
          }
        }
    };

    // Install the all-trusting trust manager
    final SSLContext sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("SSL");
    sslContext.init(null, trustAllCerts, new java.security.SecureRandom());
    // Create an ssl socket factory with our all-trusting manager
    final SSLSocketFactory sslSocketFactory = sslContext.getSocketFactory();

    OkHttpClient.Builder builder = new OkHttpClient.Builder();
    builder.sslSocketFactory(sslSocketFactory, (X509TrustManager)trustAllCerts[0]);
    builder.hostnameVerifier(new HostnameVerifier() {
      @Override
      public boolean verify(String hostname, SSLSession session) {
        return true;
      }
    });

    OkHttpClient okHttpClient = builder.build();
    return okHttpClient;
  } catch (Exception e) {
    throw new RuntimeException(e);
  }
}
  • 9
    Why SSL and not TLS? – IgorGanapolsky Oct 23 '15 at 16:42
  • 1
    Thanks a lot for this! The documentation on retrofit (uses okhttp) is lacking, this kind of code samples saves me so much time again and again. – Warpzit Jan 7 '16 at 14:31
  • 8
    Note this approach doesn't work any more with current versions of OkHttp . With 3.1.1 it seems completely broken. From 3.1.2 onwards, X509TrustManager.getAcceptedIssuers() must return an empty array instead of null. For more information, see this commit (scroll down and see the notes under RealTrustRootIndex.java). – jbxbergdev Feb 10 '16 at 17:05
  • 2
    Thank you! 2.5 years later and your answer save my life :) – user1079425 Mar 23 '17 at 18:50
  • 8
    I've tried this, but I still get Handshake failed exception. Any suggestions? – Esteban Apr 20 '17 at 9:06
13

Following method is deprecated

sslSocketFactory(SSLSocketFactory sslSocketFactory)

Consider updating it to

sslSocketFactory(SSLSocketFactory sslSocketFactory, X509TrustManager trustManager)
11

update okhttp3.0 ,the getAcceptedIssuers() function must return an empty array instead of null

  • 2
    Can you explain how this solves the issue? – GabrielOshiro May 8 '16 at 2:25
  • 2
    @Override public X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() { return new X509Certificate[]{};//StackOverflow } – Ervin Zhang May 19 '16 at 12:32
10

SSLSocketFactory does not expose its X509TrustManager, which is a field that OkHttp needs to build a clean certificate chain. This method instead must use reflection to extract the trust manager. Applications should prefer to call sslSocketFactory(SSLSocketFactory, X509TrustManager), which avoids such reflection.

OkHttpClient.Builder builder = new OkHttpClient.Builder();

builder.sslSocketFactory(sslContext.getSocketFactory(),
                    new X509TrustManager() {
                        @Override
                        public void checkClientTrusted(java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
                        }

                        @Override
                        public void checkServerTrusted(java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] chain, String authType) throws CertificateException {
                        }

                        @Override
                        public java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
                            return new java.security.cert.X509Certificate[]{};
                        }
                    });
  • This doesn't work for self-signed certs. Causes a 401 Unauthorized error. – IgorGanapolsky Jun 5 '18 at 14:55
  • Where does the sslContext come from? – Anonsage Mar 24 at 18:05
-6

You should never look to override certificate validation in code! If you need to do testing, use an internal/test CA and install the CA root certificate on the device or emulator. You can use BurpSuite or Charles Proxy if you don't know how to setup a CA.

  • 29
    Oh come on. What if you are working for a company and they are forcing you to connect to their HTTPS server via VPN. How you gonna simulate that in a test? – IgorGanapolsky Oct 23 '15 at 16:46
  • 4
    Ya this is purest hog-wash. We only compile this in in test builds, so there is no danger. – Adam Mar 1 '16 at 20:04

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