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I try to sum up percent from a suite of simple trading orders in Java.

Let say that an "order" is composed of a position (BUY/SELL), a price and a quantity. If I have:

TIME | POSITION | QTY |PRICE

DAY1: BUY 1 at 10$

DAY2: SELL 1 at 12$

I have made 20% and it's quite easy to program it. But... taking another example, I'm not smart enough to find the right way to get the total percent:

TIME | POSITION | QTY | MARKET PRICE

DAY1: BUY 1 at 10$

DAY2: SELL 1 at 12$ -> (20%)

DAY3: BUY 2 at 10$ -> (0%)

DAY4: SELL 1 at 13$ -> (30%)

DAY5: SELL 1 at 14$ -> (40%)

So a total of 90%.

First question, can these percentages be sum up ? (is it mathematically correct ?)

Second, how you will do that in java ?

Here is a sample method which is just working for first example:

public static double getTotalPercent(List<MarketOrder> orders) {

    double percent = 0;
    MarketOrder previousOrder = orders.get(0);
    for (int i = 1; i < orders.size(); i++) {
        MarketOrder order = orders.get(i);
        percent += getPercent(previousOrder, order);
        previousOrder = order;
    }
    return percent;
}
  • I am not following, can you "sell what you don't have"? It seems you buy 1 once, and sell it 3 times. Also, what's the influence of 2 here? You paid 10$ for it, without seeing anything back from this investment, shouldn't it be factored somehow? – amit Aug 26 '14 at 21:51
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    Are you wanting to calculate the percentage gain/loss from transactions? For example, in your second example, n units are bought at $30 total, and n units are sold at $39, so a gain of 30% - – jdphenix Aug 26 '14 at 21:52
  • Add up the money made from sales. Add up the total money from purchases. Work out the percentage gain based on these two, exactly as you would for the simpler example. As @jdphenix has pointed it out, in this example it's 30%, not 90%. – Dawood says reinstate Monica Aug 26 '14 at 22:00
  • "I'm not smart enough" - Yes you are, don't insult yourself :) – jdphenix Aug 26 '14 at 22:30
  • @amit: yes I can sell what I don't have. 2 is the quantity. I edit the post – Odyssee Aug 26 '14 at 22:44
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Assuming the following:

You have some type MarketOrder that looks like this,

class MarketOrder {
    public static enum OrderType {
        BUY, 
        SELL, 
    }

    private final MarketOrder.OrderType type; 
    private final int amount; 
    private final int money; 

    public MarketOrder(MarketOrder.OrderType type, int amount, int money) { 
        if (amount < 1 || money < 1) { 
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(); 
        }

        this.type = type; 
        this.amount = amount; 
        this.money = money; 
    }
}

and you have some Collection<MarketOrder> that represents transactions that you want to calculate a profit for, then declare a static method on MarketOrder that calculates the profit or loss of a Collection<MarketOrder>,

public static double calculateProfit(Collection<MarketOrder> orders) {
    if (orders == null) {
        throw new NullPointerException("orders is null");
    }

    int buyTotal = 0, sellTotal = 0, buyMoney = 0, sellMoney = 0; 
    for (MarketOrder order : orders) { 
        if (order.type == MarketOrder.OrderType.BUY) { // accumulate the units bought and money
            buyTotal += order.amount; 
            buyMoney += order.money * order.amount; 
        } else {
            sellTotal += order.amount; 
            sellMoney += order.money * order.amount;
        }
    }

    if (buyTotal != sellTotal) { 
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("buyTotal != sellTotal");
    }

    return ((double)sellMoney/(double)buyMoney) - 1; 
}

Obviously, the exact code you'll need to work out depends upon your MarketOrder type, but the key bits (accumlating the amounts of the transactions, doing the math) is the same.

  • tested, thanks jdphenix! – Odyssee Aug 26 '14 at 22:53

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