19

I want to test if a number double x is an integer power of 10. I could perhaps use cmath's log10 and then test if x == (int) x?

edit: Actually, my solution does not work because doubles can be very big, much bigger than int, and also very small, like fractions.

  • 2
    @Yacoby A power of ten is a number of the form 10^n where n is an integer, so this will certainly work. – Andreas Brinck Mar 31 '10 at 9:32
  • 5
    Note that IEEE754 doubles have only 52 bits of precision. As a result, 10^15 can be represented exactly but double(10^16)==double(10^16+1). As a result, you will have either false positives or false negatives. Using long long (where available) might be better. – MSalters Mar 31 '10 at 10:17
  • So 10E15 is the maximum power of 10 that can be represented exactly. For the sake of curiosity, what is the minimum one, 10E-15? – Giovanni Funchal Mar 31 '10 at 10:51
  • 6
    @Helltone: no negative power of ten can be represented exactly, because 1/10 doesn't have a finite binary representation. – Mike Seymour Mar 31 '10 at 11:03
  • 1
    See also a similar question on Code Review SE – hippietrail Nov 30 '17 at 6:16
23

A lookup table will be by far the fastest and most precise way to do this; only about 600 powers of 10 are representable as doubles. You can use a hash table, or if the table is ordered from smallest to largest, you can rapidly search it with binary chop.

This has the advantage that you will get a "hit" if and only if your number is exactly the closest possible IEEE double to some power of 10. If this isn't what you want, you need to be more precise about exactly how you would like your solution to handle the fact that many powers of 10 can't be exactly represented as doubles.

The best way to construct the table is probably to use string -> float conversion; that way hopefully your library authors will already have solved the problem of how to do the conversion in a way that gives the most precise answer possible.

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  • 3
    Since Helltone was looking for exact matches only, that would be 16 possible matches, not 600. All the more an argument for just checking against those constants. – Christopher Creutzig Mar 31 '10 at 12:21
  • 1
    @Christopher: Actually, there are 19 exactly representable powers of 10 in double precision. – Stephen Canon Apr 1 '10 at 22:31
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    @Stephen Canon: How do you get 19? I make it 23, assuming IEEE 754 binary64 doubles. (10^0 through 10^22 are all exactly representable, but 10^23 is not, falling exactly halfway between two representable doubles.) – Mark Dickinson Apr 2 '10 at 9:51
  • @Mark Dickinson: You're right of course. I didn't actually check, having done the computation for some other reason about a year ago. Clearly I misremembered the result. 10^22 = 0x1.0f0cf064dd592p73 is the largest exactly representable power of 10 in the binary64 format. – Stephen Canon Apr 2 '10 at 17:40
10

Your solution sounds good but I would replace the exact comparison with a tolerance one.

double exponent = log10(value);
double rounded = floor(exponent + 0.5);
if (fabs(exponent - rounded) < some_tolerance) {
    //Power of ten
}
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  • 1
    And maybe replace the cast to int with a call to floor, I find that expresses the intend better. – Björn Pollex Mar 31 '10 at 9:20
  • And before someone complains this will technically include some numbers that are not powers of 10, I'll mention that IEE754 floating point notation doesn't even have exact representations for very large or very small powers of 10. – smehmood Mar 31 '10 at 10:43
  • I wanted a precise answer, not rounded. If precise answer is not possible, best to warn the user. – Giovanni Funchal Mar 31 '10 at 10:56
  • 1
    @Helltone: if you want a precise answer, then either some_tolerance be close or equal to zero (the latter is not recommended because of the told reasons). "Exact" answers for your scenario are only possible with integral data types. – Robert Mar 31 '10 at 11:59
  • 1
    @smehmood: IEEE754 floating point notation doesn't have exact representations for any negative powers of 10. 0.1 is a continuing decimal in binary (if "decimal" is the right word to use). – David Thornley Apr 1 '10 at 18:09
5

I am afraid you're in for a world of hurt. There is no way to cast down a very large or very small floating point number to a BigInt class because you lost precision when using the small floating point number.

For example float only has 6 digits of precision. So if you represent 109 as a float chances are it will be converted back as 1 000 000 145 or something like that: nothing guarantees what the last digits will be, they are off the precision.

You can of course use a much more precise representation, like double which has 15 digits of precision. So normally you should be able to represent integers from 0 to 1014 faithfully.

Finally some platforms may have a long long type with an ever greater precision.

But anyway, as soon as your value exceed the number of digits available to be converted back to an integer without loss... you can't test it for being a power of ten.

If you really need this precision, my suggestion is not to use a floating point number. There are mathematical libraries available with BigInt implementations or you can roll your own (though efficiency is difficult to achieve).

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2
bool power_of_ten(double x) {
   if(x < 1.0 || x > 10E15) {
      warning("IEEE754 doubles can only precisely represent powers "
              "of ten between 1 and 10E15, answer will be approximate.");
   }
   double exponent;
   // power of ten if log10 of absolute value has no fractional part
   return !modf(log10(fabs(x)), &exponent);
}
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  • 2
    Assuming, of course, that log10 returns the exact value, and isn't off by a whole ULP. – David Thornley Apr 1 '10 at 18:11
  • IEEE-754 can actually represent powers of 10 up to 10²², although the largest power of 10 that's smaller than 2⁵³ is 10¹⁵ – phuclv Jan 21 at 14:39
1

Depending on the platform your code needs to run on the log might be very expensive.

Since the amount of numbers that are 10^n (where n is natural) is very small, it might be faster to just use a hardcoded lookup table.

(Ugly pseudo code follows:)

bool isPowerOfTen( int16 x )
{
  if( x == 10       // n=1
    || x == 100     // n=2
    || x == 1000    // n=3
    || x == 10000 ) // n=4
  return true;

  return false;
}

This covers the whole int16 range and if that is all you need might be a lot faster. (Depending on the platform.)

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  • 2
    The question specifically mentions doubles. – Joris Timmermans Mar 31 '10 at 10:12
  • It didn't when I wrote the comment, but in that case you are certainly right. But even then changing it to BCD and just checking for a trailing zero might be faster. – Andreas Apr 8 '10 at 10:31
  • Oh and downvoting a the obviously right solution (lookup table) just because of incomplete pseudocode is helping nobody ;) – Andreas Apr 8 '10 at 10:34
  • 1 is a power of 10, i.e. 10^0 – Adam Burry Sep 25 '13 at 14:19
0

How about a code like this:


#include <stdio.h>
#define MAX 20
bool check_pow10(double num)
{
   char arr[MAX];
   sprintf(arr,"%lf",num);
   char* ptr = arr;
   bool isFirstOne = true;

   while (*ptr)
   {
     switch (*ptr++)
     {
       case '1':
                if (isFirstOne)
                   isFirstOne = false;
                else
                   return false;
                break;
       case '0':
                break;
       case '.':
                break;
       default:
                return false;
     }
   }

 return true;
}

int main()
{
  double number;
  scanf("%lf",&number);
  printf("isPower10: %s\n",check_pow10(number)?"yes":"no");
}

That would not work for negative powers of 10 though.
EDIT: works for negative powers also.

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  • A creative solution, but he is using doubles. Doubles cannot represent every number with perfect accuracy, that's why you sometimes see calculations that look like this: (1 / 3) * 3 = 0.99999999.... The look-up table already suggested is preferred, because it will store the "closest" representation of the power of 10. So if 0.999999887723x10^24 is the closest you get to 1.0000*10^25, you can store the "just off a bit" value and still get a positive hit. – Edwin Buck Mar 31 '10 at 14:22
0

if you don't need it to be fast, use recursion. Pseudocode:

bool checkifpoweroften(double Candidadte)
     if Candidate>=10
         return (checkifpoweroften(Candidadte/10) 
     elsif Candidate<=0.1
         return (checkifpoweroften(Candidadte*10)
     elsif Candidate == 1
         return 1
     else 
         return 0

You still need to choose between false positives and false negatives and add tolerances accordingly, as other answers pointed out. The tolerances should apply to all comparisons, or else, for exemple, 9.99999999 would fail the >=10 comparison.

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  • This will blow the stack when Candidadte is very large or small. – Hans Passant Mar 31 '10 at 11:35
  • @nobugz: Unlikely. The recursion depth is limited by the number of bits in the exponent of double; typically this would recurse no more than 1023 times (but fail to produce meaningful results after 15 recursions) – MSalters Mar 31 '10 at 11:53
  • 2
    You're right, temporary blood supply restriction to the brain. Hope it's temporary... – Hans Passant Mar 31 '10 at 12:02
0

how about that:

bool isPow10(double number, double epsilon)
{
    if (number > 0)
    {
        for (int i=1; i <16; i++)
        {
            if ( (number >= (pow((double)10,i) - epsilon)) && 
                (number <= (pow((double)10,i) + epsilon)))
            { 
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
    return false;
}

I guess if performance is an issue the few values could be precomputed, with or without the epsilon according to the needs.

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-1

A variant of this one:

double log10_value= log10(value);
double integer_value;
double fractional_value= modf(log10_value, &integer_value);

return fractional_value==0.0;

Note that the comparison to 0.0 is exact rather than within a particular epsilon since you want to ensure that log10_value is an integer.

EDIT: Since this sparked a bit of controversy due to log10 possibly being imprecise and the generic understanding that you shouldn't compare doubles without an epsilon, here's a more precise way of determining if a double is a power of 10 using only properties of powers of 10 and IEEE 754 doubles.

First, a clarification: a double can represent up to 1E22, as 1e22 has only 52 significant bits. Luckily, 5^22 also only has 52 significant bits, so we can determine if a double is (2*5)^n for n= [0, 22]:

bool is_pow10(double value)
{
    int exponent;
    double mantissa= frexp(value, &exponent);

    int exponent_adjustment= exponent/10;

    int possible_10_exponent= (exponent - exponent_adjustment)/3;

    if (possible_10_exponent>=0 && 
        possible_10_exponent<=22)
    {
        mantissa*= pow(2.0, exponent - possible_10_exponent);

        return mantissa==pow(5.0, possible_10_exponent);
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}

Since 2^10==1024, that adds an extra bit of significance that we have to remove from the possible power of 5.

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  • 1
    Never compare a double with == – Pavel Radzivilovsky Mar 31 '10 at 16:30
  • Better would be: double double_epsilon=1e-10; return fractional_value < double_epsilon; – Pavel Radzivilovsky Mar 31 '10 at 16:32
  • The answer is correct as given. If the fractional part has any value other than 0, the value is not a power of 10. (The fractional part of log10(10000000000.000099) is ~3.55e-15, for example.) – please delete me Mar 31 '10 at 20:47
  • @Pavel, did you read the last sentence in the post? Comparing against any epsilon rather than 0.0 will give an incorrect result. This is one of a few cases where you need to compare against a single value rather than a range of values. – MSN Mar 31 '10 at 21:02
  • Where is it written that log10 must return the exact mathematical result if that value is representable as a double? If you can show this, you win (at least my upvote). If not, then this is not guaranteed to work. – President James Moveon Polk Mar 31 '10 at 23:25

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