10

I found somewhere the following idiom for reading a file into a string:

std::ifstream file("path/to/some/file.ext");
std::string contents(
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(file),
    (std::istreambuf_iterator<char>())
);

Which works just fine as it is. However, if I remove the parentheses around the second iterator argument, that is:

std::string contents(
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(file),
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char>()
);

As soon as I try to call any method on the string object, for example:

const char *buffer = contents.c_str();

I get a compile error of the form:

error: request for member 'c_str' in 'contents', which is of non-class type 'std::string(std::istreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> >, std::istreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> > (*)()) {aka std::basic_string<char>(std::istreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> >, std::istreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> > (*)())}'

Also if I try to assign that string to another:

std::string contents2 = contents;

I get an error of the form:

error: conversion from 'std::string(std::istreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> >, std::istreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> > (*)()) {aka std::basic_string<char>(std::istreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> >, std::istreambuf_iterator<char, std::char_traits<char> > (*)())}' to non-scalar type 'std::string {aka std::basic_string<char>}' requested

Why is this? I can see no reason for those parentheses being needed, much less affect the type definition of the contents variable. I am using g++ 4.8.2.

  • So many Most Vexing Parse questions here, but this one is pretty similar. – chris Aug 27 '14 at 1:07
  • 2
    That's great as long as you know what Most Vexing Parse is. If you don't (like I didn't), it's difficult to even know what to look for. Which is why I decided to ask this question. – xperroni Aug 28 '14 at 2:39
17

That is an example of Most Vexing Parse:

std::string contents(
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(file),
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char>()
);

The statement is parsed as the declaration of a function named contents that takes two parameters. One parameter that is a variable named file of type std::istreambuf_iterator, and a second one that is a function that takes no arguments and returns an std::istreambuf_iterator. Specification of function parameter names are optional.

Wrapping at least one of the expressions in parenthesis causes it to be parsed as a variable definition.

C++11 solves this problem with its provision of uniform-initialization:

std::string contents{std::istreambuf_iterator<char>{file}, {}};

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.