8

If I had a string as such

var comment =  "Mmmm #yummy #donut at #CZ"

How can I get a list of hash tags that exist in the string variable?

I tried using JavaScript split() method but I have to keep splitting all strings created from the initial split string. Is there a simpler way of doing this?

2

6 Answers 6

16

This will do it for anything with alphabetic characters, you can extend the regexp for other characters if you want:

myString.match(/#[a-z]+/gi);
6
  • Thanks I'm new to JS, I did think it would be so simple in JS. :)
    – codeBarer
    Aug 28, 2014 at 0:17
  • On the surface this works but if you look at the link @SLaks provided, the hash tag syntax is a bit more complicated Aug 28, 2014 at 0:27
  • 5
    This doesn't capture numbers in hashtags or text after underscores. If you want this support use: text.match(/#[a-z0-9_]+/g);. And here's an working playground example: regexr.com/3gkpo
    – pbojinov
    Aug 28, 2017 at 22:59
  • 1
    It works for the examples given - this isn't necessarily a Twitter-related question. If it is, or the hash tag syntax is more complicated than stated here, then I would agree something different may be needed. Answer is based off of the question without reading into it further. May 13, 2018 at 19:19
  • @pbojinov the regex is excluding the last hashtag which has no space in the end. In the example, #CZ. This also includes the last hashtag ``` text.match(/#[a-z0-9_]+/gi) ``` Oct 8, 2020 at 14:05
16

Just use a regular expression to find occurences of a hash followed by non-whitespace characters.

"Mmmm #yummy #donut at #CZ".match(/#\w+/g)
// evaluates to ["#yummy", "#donut", "#CZ"]
0
11

Do you care about Unicode or non-English hashtags?

"Mmmm #yummy #donut at #CZ #中文 #.dou #。#?#♥️ #にほ".match(/#[\p{L}]+/ugi)
=> (5) ["#yummy", "#donut", "#CZ", "#中文", "#にほ"]

As explained by this answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/35112226/515585

\p{L} matches unicode characters

u the PCRE_UTF8 modifier, this modifier turns on additional functionality of PCRE that is incompatible with Perl.

1
  • #hash-tags, #sea_lion not working Oct 4, 2021 at 3:41
5

if you care about readability:

yourText.split(' ').filter(v=> v.startsWith('#'))

will return ["#yummy", "#donut", "#CZ"]

3
  • this is awesome! very easy and does whats needed! Apr 13, 2020 at 18:37
  • this will create problem if the hash tag is the last word of a line and another line is there.
    – Harkal
    May 29, 2020 at 20:42
  • 2
    I think this is not enough as it won't work with return carriages .split(/[\s\n\r]/gmi).filter(v=> v.startsWith('#')) will do better I guess and will also work with all languages Apr 8, 2021 at 8:00
2

Here is another very simple regex which will allow using emojis and numbers in hashtags as well as not using any white space to have them split. Most of the time this should be more than sufficent:

"Mmmm #yummy #donut at #CZ#efrefg #:) #cool😎#r234#FEGERGR#fegergr".match(/#[^\s#]*/gmi);
// => ["#yummy", "#donut", "#CZ", "#efrefg", "#:)", "#cool😎", "#r234", "#FEGERGR", "#fegergr"]

There is a little downside though: This regex will add punctuation to the end of hashtags, e.g.:

"Mmmm #yummy.#donut#cool😎#r234#FEGERGR;#fegergr".match(/#[^\s#]*/gmi);
// => ["#yummy.", "#donut", "#cool😎", "#r234", "#FEGERGR;", "#fegergr"]

But you can extend the regex yourself to the characters (punctuation) that you want to omit though, like this:

"Mmmm #yummy.#donut#cool😎#r234#FEGERGR;#fegergr".match(/#[^\s#\.\;]*/gmi);
// => ["#yummy", "#donut", "#cool😎", "#r234", "#FEGERGR", "#fegergr"]
0

If you need a character of any alphabet within hashtag, I'd go with something like this:

let text = "улетные #выходные // #holiday in the countryside";
const hashtags = []
if (text.length) {
    let preHashtags = text.split('#')
    let i = 0;
    if (text[0] !== '#') i++ 

    for (null; i < preHashtags.length; i++) {
        let item = preHashtags[i]
        hashtags.push(item.split(' ')[0]) 
        // String.prototype.split() is needed to sort out non-hashtag related string data
    }
}


console.log(hashtags) // outputs [ 'выходные', 'holiday' ]

We use if (text[0] !== '#') i++ to check if first letter in "text" string is not a '#'. In that case we do not need to iterate through the first element in the preHashtags Array. Otherwise, our text string starts with a hashtag and we need to handle it.

Take note that you may need to do input validation of resulting hashtags array. Also note that null in the for loop is only for readability purposes, you could also use for (;i < preHashtags.length; i++)

The benefit of this approach is that it definitely includes any possible symbol (hence the need for sanity checks), including all non-latin alphabets, as well as simpler to understand, especially for beginners. The performance, on the other hand, is superior, when checked in Chrome (and thus probably other Chromium-derived browsers, as well as node.js), while 6-7% worse in Firefox & 13% worse in Safari, judged by this test: https://jsben.ch/VuhEi.

Thus, the choice depends on whether you are going to run your code in node.js or browser and if it is the latter, do you have a lot of mobile clients using MobileSafari?

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.