9

This question already has an answer here:

How do I remove trailing zeros in a String value and remove decimal point if the string contains only zeros after the decimal point? I'm using the below code:

String string1 = Double.valueOf(a).toString()

This removes trailing zeros in (10.10 and 10.2270), but I do not get my expected result for 1st and 2nd inputs.

Input

10.0
10.00
10.10
10.2270

Expected output

10
10
10.1
10.227

marked as duplicate by icza, alfasin, Scary Wombat, jww, EdChum Aug 28 '14 at 7:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • try using BigDecimal – Scary Wombat Aug 28 '14 at 6:00
  • best bet is regex for such requirement – vikeng21 Aug 28 '14 at 6:04
  • @ScaryWombat The proposed duplicate has a double as the input. This question has a String. – jdphenix Aug 28 '14 at 7:14
  • 1
    @jdphenix so why does OP do String string1 = Double.valueOf(a).toString() – Scary Wombat Aug 28 '14 at 7:22
  • 1
    @ScaryWombat Because I didn't read the question closely enough. Oops. – jdphenix Aug 28 '14 at 7:23
8

The Java library has a built-in class that can do this for it. It's BigDecimal.

Here is an example usage:

BigDecimal number = new BigDecimal("10.2270");  
System.out.println(number.stripTrailingZeros().toPlainString());

Output:

10.227

Note: It is important to use the BigDecimal constructor that takes a String. You probably don't want the one that takes a double.


Here's a method that will take a Collection<String> and return another Collection<String> of numbers with trailing zeros removed, gift wrapped.

public static Collection<String> stripZeros(Collection<String> numbers) {
    if (numbers == null) { 
        throw new NullPointerException("numbers is null");
    }

    ArrayList<String> value = new ArrayList<>(); 

    for (String number : numbers) { 
        value.add(new BigDecimal(number).stripTrailingZeros().toPlainString());
    }

    return Collections.unmodifiableList(value);
}

Example usage:

ArrayList<String> input = new ArrayList<String>() {{ 
    add("10.0"); add("10.00"); add("10.10"); add("10.2270"); 
}};

Collection<String> output = stripZeros(input);
System.out.println(output);

Outputs:

[10, 10, 10.1, 10.227]
  • no way so cool +1 – Kick Buttowski Aug 28 '14 at 6:25
  • 1
    I discovered that stripTrailingZeros() with also a call to toPlainString() results in output that is outside of your spec. I have corrected my answer. – jdphenix Aug 28 '14 at 6:42
  • I did not ask the question lol – Kick Buttowski Aug 28 '14 at 6:44
  • while technically correct it is not useful for me, case in point: 1.23 becomes 1.229999999999999982236431605997495353221893310546875. So yes, no trailing zeros for sure – – ycomp Jan 5 '18 at 3:56
0

Try

DecimalFormat decimalFormat = new DecimalFormat("#.##");
String string1 = decimalFormat.format(10.000);
  • 2
    This would remove anything beyond the 2nd mantissa digit. – jdphenix Aug 28 '14 at 6:50
-3

Try regex like this :

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String s = "10.0";
    System.out.println(s.replaceAll("[0]+$", "").replaceAll("(\\.)(?!.*?[1-9]+)", ""));

}

O/P:
10

input :String s = "10.0750";
O/P : 10.075

input : String s = "10.2750";
O/P : 10.275
  • 1
    I don't mind getting downvoted. But I would like to know why? – TheLostMind Aug 28 '14 at 7:00
  • not the DV, but as someone else said "May not work in every locale. Some use the decimal point as group separators" – Scary Wombat Aug 29 '14 at 0:01

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