93

In my project there is a method which only returns a const char*, whereas I need a char* string, as the API doesn't accept const char*.

Any idea how to convert between const char* to char*?

7
  • 9
    Beware that the API might have been design this way with good reasons in mind.
    – alk
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 13:08
  • 1
    @alk I'd said this below and this is the situation: The const char* is returned by an objective-C string method[NSString's to be more specific). This is a path of a file which got saved. Now there is another C library's api which will be parsing this file and it only takes char* strings as arguments. Even if i pass the const char* string, the parsing happens but i get a warning which i don't want to see.
    – Morpheus
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 13:33
  • As others pointed out: As you never know what the parser does (think of what strtok() does) make a copy of the data returned and pass on the copy. strdup()and free() are your friends.
    – alk
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 13:42
  • 1
    Can you tell us which functions they are and link to their documentation?
    – mafso
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 13:44
  • 2
    And in C++ there is const_cast<>()
    – Kotauskas
    Commented Jun 7, 2019 at 15:43

7 Answers 7

81

First of all you should do such things only if it is really necessary - e.g. to use some old-style API with char* arguments which are not modified. If an API function modifies the string which was const originally, then this is unspecified behaviour, very likely crash.

Use cast:

(char*)const_char_ptr
6
  • 16
    I think this answer as it is encourages too much a dangerous practice. It could be improved by making the warnings about undefined behaviour clearer and stronger. At the moment I think many readers will just read the first 2 lines and not notice the important warnings.
    – PeterSW
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 15:07
  • 3
    Now warnings are first and the answer later. Commented May 13, 2015 at 21:14
  • 2
    Or at least use const_cast<char*> so the compiler knows too.
    – MultiMat
    Commented Oct 15, 2018 at 12:29
  • 1
    @MultiMat No such thing as const_cast in C. Commented Oct 15, 2018 at 13:09
  • My C++ is rusty but wouldnt this cause issues, when it goes out of scope?
    – Hossein
    Commented Apr 14, 2020 at 15:05
37

To make sure you don't break stuff, make a copy of the returned string.

The function returning const char* expects this string will never be changed. Therefore things can/will break if your code or the API you pass it make a change after all.

Even worse, if a change is made, your program is likely to crash you in case the returned string was literal (e.g. "hello I'm a literal string") because they are (often) stored in memory that can't be written to.

You could use strdup() for this, but read the small print. Or you can of course create your own version if it's not there on your platform.

2
  • 4
    Necro for a response to the question can't you change your code: APIs often require string, char* or const char*, and yeah in theory you could change the entire API, but it's good information to know how to quickly convert it
    – Skathix
    Commented Apr 25, 2018 at 17:44
  • @Skathix You're right, APIs can't often be changed (I think wrote that in error). Removed that part of my answer. Thanks! Commented Sep 12, 2020 at 6:43
32

You can use the strdup function which has the following prototype

char *strdup(const char *s1);

Example of use:

#include <string.h>

char * my_str = strdup("My string literal!");
char * my_other_str = strdup(some_const_str);

or strcpy/strncpy to your buffer

or rewrite your functions to use const char * as parameter instead of char * where possible so you can preserve the const

5
  • 3
    strdup is a non standard implemantation. So you shouldn't be sure he "can use it"
    – dhein
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 13:13
  • Implementing a missing strdup() is a matter of 15 minutes.
    – alk
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 13:44
  • 5
    @alk of course. But as the OP is catching such a problem and is asking for a solution, it is posibbly not a solution for him "implementing strdup by your self" ya know?
    – dhein
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 14:15
  • @Zaibis: if (constptr) {char * p = calloc(strlen(constptr)+1, sizeof(*constptr)); if (!p) fail(); strcpy(p, constptr); my_nonconstptr_func(p); free(p);}
    – alk
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 14:19
  • 2
    @alk well, now we have the implementation. Doesn't change anything on my statement. ;)
    – dhein
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 14:21
7

A const to a pointer indicates a "read-only" memory location. Whereas the ones without const are a read-write memory areas. So, you "cannot" convert a const(read-only location) to a normal(read-write) location.

The alternate is to copy the data to a different read-write location and pass this pointer to the required function. You may use strdup() to perform this action.

1
  • 1
    Exactly. const is specified to say that the value remains constant and cannot be further modified.
    – Adit Ya
    Commented Nov 25, 2016 at 9:37
2

To convert a const char* to char* you could create a function like this :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char* unconstchar(const char* s) {
    if(!s)
      return NULL;
    int i;
    char* res = NULL;
    res = (char*) malloc(strlen(s)+1);
    if(!res){
        fprintf(stderr, "Memory Allocation Failed! Exiting...\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    } else{
        for (i = 0; s[i] != '\0'; i++) {
            res[i] = s[i];
        }
        res[i] = '\0';
        return res;
    }
}

int main() {
    const char* s = "this is bikash";
    char* p = unconstchar(s);
    printf("%s",p);
    free(p);
}

2
  • 1
    In this code uninitialized variable res is used. This code res[i] = s[i] is undefined behavior, most likely crash. Commented Jun 5, 2020 at 9:02
  • Updated Code: Added check for NULL and possibly resolved undefined behavior.
    – Bikash
    Commented Jul 3, 2020 at 9:06
1

You can cast it by doing (char *)Identifier_Of_Const_char

But as there is probabbly a reason that the api doesn't accept const cahr *, you should do this only, if you are sure, the function doesn't try to assign any value in range of your const char* which you casted to a non const one.

2
  • 1
    the const char* is returned by an objective-C string method[NSString's to be more specific). This is a path of a file which got saved. Now there is another C library's api which will be parsing this file and it only takes char* strings as arguments. Even if i pass the const char* string, the parsing happens but i get a warning which i don't want to see.
    – Morpheus
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 13:31
  • @Morpheus Anyway, you can't be sure as long you didn't analyze the source by your self.
    – dhein
    Commented Aug 28, 2014 at 14:20
-1

For example, you could write this way:

const char* a = "art.bin";
char* b = new char[sizeof(a)];
strcpy(b, a);
1
  • C doesn't have a new operator. Please don't use C++ to answer C questions. Additionally, answers are more useful when they explain things rather than just provide a snippet of code.
    – Dada
    Commented Jul 26, 2022 at 8:15

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