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I want to convert some apache rules into nginx ones, and im new to nginx ...

So I searched and searched; but didn't find what I want to do. Here is the lines I want to convert in Nginx :

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -s [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -f [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -l [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -d
RewriteRule ^.*$ - [NC,L]
RewriteRule (.*) index.php?page=$1 [NC,L,QSA]

And here is what I tried:

location ~ ^/(?<page>[^\/]+)$ {
   try_files $uri /index.php?page=$page;
}
location ~ ^/(?<page>[^\/]+)?(?<qsa>[.*]+)$ {
   try_files $uri /index.php?page=$page&$qsa;
}

This isn't doing the job. What am i doing wrong?

EDIT

It was too long so i processed it with PHP, but i still wish an answer to this, i will be generous with anyone will answer nicely to this question !

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  • 1
  • @Sumurai8 i seen it, but i can't mind how to make it works with try_files – Bobot Aug 31 '14 at 16:29
  • I am sadly not that knowledgable in nginx, and don't really have a nginx server to test things out :-| I hope you get your answer ;-) – Sumurai8 Aug 31 '14 at 17:25
  • i hope too, thx :) (if you want to initiate yourself to nginx, you can make a dualboot under ubuntu, and apt-get nginx ;) ) – Bobot Aug 31 '14 at 21:39
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+50

The Apache QSA flag is query-string-append, in the Nginx world the query string is stored in $args.

So with try_files something like that should work:

location ~ ^/(?<page>[^\/]+)$ {
   try_files $uri /index.php?page=$page&$args;
}

Now I do not understand all the things you do in the location 'regex', (I'm a weak human, when I read regex I always feel like six year old kids trying to read their first words).

Using things like

location ~ ^/(.*) {
    try_files $uri/ $uri /index.php?page=$1&$args;
}

Should already manage the directory test (the $uri/ test check for the directory access), the real file direct access ($uri) and then fallback to index.php with the given url as page argument.

Your current first apache rule is:

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -s [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -f [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -l [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -d
RewriteRule ^.*$ - [NC,L]

It checks for direct directory access (-d), direct file access (-f), symbolic links (-s) or direct file-with-size-greater-than-0 access with -s, this last one is a subset of -f so i'm not sure you need it.

So the only thing we still have to handle is symbolic links direct access. This is managed by a configuration option in nginx

disable_symlinks off;

For the NC tag, case insensitive pattern comparison, it should not be a problem with something like /*, no character in the pattern.

3
  • Much thanks with this ! To explain the regex mmhhh, i would say that i'm parsing the URI from / to /, cuz i use it like that in my PHP script :) – Bobot Sep 4 '14 at 22:04
  • Just edited it ! This was the good way but you forgot & between $page and $args – Bobot Sep 5 '14 at 14:06
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    added your fix on the answer, better with the &, you were right. – regilero Sep 5 '14 at 18:07

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