15

When I use ASP.NET Identity first code approach, I want to generate columns in AspNetUsers table in my own way. I don't need to have stored multiple columns with null values. I just need columns Id, SecurityStamp and UserName. Only post, that I've found is here: AspNet Identity 2.0 Email and UserName duplication , but it is still unsloved (due to error in Santosh comment).

So can anybody tell my how to solve this?

EDIT: Is it even possible to delete some of these columns/properties?

Thanks

5
  • 3
    you may not need those values, but are you sure asp.net does not need them to function correctly?
    – sa_ddam213
    Aug 29, 2014 at 0:17
  • I realize there can be some relationship, I've edit my question
    – exeq
    Aug 29, 2014 at 0:29
  • 1
    If you want your own custom tables, then don't use Identity.Entityframework Aug 29, 2014 at 0:54
  • 2
    Do you not have email for users? What about password hash? Why null-columns bother you? they don't take much space and have no effect on db-performance. You just creating extra work for yourself.
    – trailmax
    Aug 29, 2014 at 10:02
  • Thank you, that is what I want to hear
    – exeq
    Aug 29, 2014 at 10:05

5 Answers 5

42

Actually you can ignore the fields, just you need to configure your entity OnModelCreating within your context Class as:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
        modelBuilder.Entity<IdentityUser>().Ignore(c => c.AccessFailedCount)
                                           .Ignore(c=> c.LockoutEnabled)
                                           .Ignore(c=>c.LockoutEndDateUtc)
                                           .Ignore(c=>c.Roles)
                                           .Ignore(c=>c.TwoFactorEnabled);//and so on...

        modelBuilder.Entity<IdentityUser>().ToTable("Users");//to change the name of table.

}
2
  • 1
    Can you be more specific as to where the "context" class is located?
    – webworm
    Feb 1, 2017 at 22:27
  • 1
    To answer my own question the context class is ApplicationDbContext
    – webworm
    Feb 1, 2017 at 22:28
5

Actually you can, just configure your entity on OnModelCreating of your context class.

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<IdentityUser>().Ignore(u => u.AccessFailedCount);
    //and so on...
}

Or if your application has a separate file for each configuration (wich is what i recommend), you can do like this:

public class ApplicationUserEntityTypeConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<ApplicationUser>
{
    public ApplicationUserEntityTypeConfiguration()
    {
        Ignore(p => p.AccessFailedCount);
        //And so on..
    }
}
1
  • 2
    It is throwing exception when I am going to add migration Jul 1, 2016 at 12:50
3

The short answer is no, not without rolling your own implementation. Or you can wait for them to open source asp.net identity on codeplex. Who knows how long that will take.

The default implementation includes all of those unused columns (see below).

// Summary:
//     Default EntityFramework IUser implementation
//
// Type parameters:
//   TKey:
//
//   TLogin:
//
//   TRole:
//
//   TClaim:
public class IdentityUser<TKey, TLogin, TRole, TClaim> : IUser<TKey>
    where TLogin : Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.EntityFramework.IdentityUserLogin<TKey>
    where TRole : Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.EntityFramework.IdentityUserRole<TKey>
    where TClaim : Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.EntityFramework.IdentityUserClaim<TKey>
{
    // Summary:
    //     Constructor
    public IdentityUser();

    // Summary:
    //     Used to record failures for the purposes of lockout
    public virtual int AccessFailedCount { get; set; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     Navigation property for user claims
    public virtual ICollection<TClaim> Claims { get; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     Email
    public virtual string Email { get; set; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     True if the email is confirmed, default is false
    public virtual bool EmailConfirmed { get; set; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     User ID (Primary Key)
    public virtual TKey Id { get; set; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     Is lockout enabled for this user
    public virtual bool LockoutEnabled { get; set; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     DateTime in UTC when lockout ends, any time in the past is considered not
    //     locked out.
    public virtual DateTime? LockoutEndDateUtc { get; set; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     Navigation property for user logins
    public virtual ICollection<TLogin> Logins { get; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     The salted/hashed form of the user password
    public virtual string PasswordHash { get; set; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     PhoneNumber for the user
    public virtual string PhoneNumber { get; set; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     True if the phone number is confirmed, default is false
    public virtual bool PhoneNumberConfirmed { get; set; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     Navigation property for user roles
    public virtual ICollection<TRole> Roles { get; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     A random value that should change whenever a users credentials have changed
    //     (password changed, login removed)
    public virtual string SecurityStamp { get; set; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     Is two factor enabled for the user
    public virtual bool TwoFactorEnabled { get; set; }
    //
    // Summary:
    //     User name
    public virtual string UserName { get; set; }
}
2
  • Thanks. Do you think, it is a problem to have 100 000 of records, or even more, in this table with all those fields null ?I don't want to create custom tables, because I am using ASP.NET Identity login functionality.
    – exeq
    Aug 29, 2014 at 8:32
  • I'm not a DBA by any means, but I don't think it's that big of a problem. The tables are indexed and keyed properly, so you should be fine. Another option might be to consider this project: github.com/brockallen/BrockAllen.IdentityReboot . I haven't used it personally, but it may give you the flexibility you desire.
    – drneel
    Aug 29, 2014 at 11:32
0

I know this might not be completely related, but if you simply want to exclude columns in JSON responses all you have to do is place [JsonIgnore] above the property. I use Entity so by default the (encrypted) password is included in the model. Even if the password is encrypted you still don't want the end-user to get it. One way to maintain access to that property without including it in a response is shown below.

In the below example the Password field would be removed from the Json response because we added [JsonIgnore] to the model.

public int Id { get; set; }
public string Email { get; set; }

[JsonIgnore]
public string Password { get; set; } // <--- Removed from JSON response

public string FirstName { get; set; }
public string MiddleName { get; set; }
public string LastName { get; set; }
public string PhoneNumber { get; set; }
public bool Active { get; set; }

Here is a sample JSON response.

{
  "id": 1,
  "email": "ddavis@example.com",
  "firstName": "Daniel",
  "middleName": "Cool-Guy",
  "lastName": "Davis",
  "phoneNumber": "12055550000",
  "active": true
}
0

You can create descendant of IdentityUser override properties your need and decorate they [NotMapped] attribute. Then create (recreate) identity tables.

[NotMapped]
public override bool EmailConfirmed { get; set; }

1
  • I have not tried, but if this works, this seems to be the solution. Oct 7, 2021 at 18:18

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