9

I want to initialise a 3-dimensional array in Julia with constant entries. For the 2d case I can use

A = [1 2; 3 4]

Is there a similar short syntax for 3d arrays?

1
  • Currently, the accepted answer is one that affirms what you've asked isn't possible at the time, rather than the one that demonstrates it is possible, even for higher-dimensionality arrays. Do you think this is an acceptable state of affairs?
    – cnaak
    Commented Sep 8, 2020 at 22:38

4 Answers 4

9

Not at this time, although something like the following isn't too bad

A = zeros(2,2,2)
A[:,:,1] = [1 2; 3 4]
A[:,:,2] = [10 20; 30 40]
8

One can use either the cat or the reshape functions to accomplish the task: (tested with Julia-1.0.0):

julia> cat([1 2; 3 4], [5 6; 7 8], dims=3)
2×2×2 Array{Int64,3}:
[:, :, 1] =
 1  2
 3  4

[:, :, 2] =
 5  6
 7  8

For higher Array dimensions, the cat calls must be nested: cat(cat(..., dims=3), cat(..., dims=3), dims=4).

The reshape function allows building higher dimension Arrays "at once", i.e., without nested calls:

julia> reshape([(1:16)...], 2, 2, 2, 2)
2×2×2×2 Array{Int64,4}:
[:, :, 1, 1] =
 1  3
 2  4

[:, :, 2, 1] =
 5  7
 6  8

[:, :, 1, 2] =
  9  11
 10  12

[:, :, 2, 2] =
 13  15
 14  16
5

It is actually possible to declare a multidimensional array in julia using only list comprehension

julia> a = [x + y + z  for x in 1:2, y ∈ 2:3, z = 3:4]
2×2×2 Array{Int64,3}:
[:, :, 1] =
 6  7
 7  8

[:, :, 2] =
 7  8
 8  9

julia> size(a)
(2, 2, 2)

julia> ndims(a)
3

3

Julia documentation about Multi-dimensional Arrays is a good place to learn more about array creation.

For a 3-dimensional array, you can do the following:

julia> [1; 2;; 3; 4;; 5; 6;;;
        7; 8;; 9; 10;; 11; 12]

2×3×2 Array{Int64, 3}:
[:, :, 1] =
 1  3  5
 2  4  6

[:, :, 2] =
 7   9  11
 8  10  12

From the documentation, "... ; and ;; concatenate in the first and second dimension, using more semicolons extends this same general scheme. The number of semicolons in the separator specifies the particular dimension, so ;;; concatenates in the third dimension, ;;;; in the 4th, and so on."

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