5

I have the following function

public static T Translate<T>(T entity)
{
    ....
}

Now if T is en IEnumerable<> I want to have a different behaviour so I made a second function

public static IEnumerable<T> Translate<T>(IEnumerable<T> entities)
{
    ....
}

When I invoke it like this

IEnumerable<string> test = new List<string>().AsEnumerable();
Translate(test);

However when I invoke it like this

Func<IEnumerable<string>> func = () => new List<string>().AsEnumerable();
Translate(func.Invoke())

It goes to the first one. Why does this happen and what is the best construction to solve this?

UPDATE

I build a new example with the problem

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Func<IEnumerable<string>> stringFunction = () => new List<string>().AsEnumerable();
    InvokeFunction(ExtendFunction(stringFunction));
}

private static T Convert<T>(T text) where  T : class 
{
    return null;
}

private static IEnumerable<T> Convert<T>(IEnumerable<T> text)
{
    return null;
}

private static Func<T> ExtendFunction<T>(Func<T> func) where T : class 
{
    return () => Convert(func.Invoke());
}

private static T InvokeFunction<T>(Func<T> func)
{
    return func.Invoke();
}

The first function gets invoken now when I expect the second to be invoked.

10
  • best contruction maybe to turn the IEnumerable one into an extension method so it is clearer that you are trying to invoke that specific one - Removed the first part of my comment after looking at documentation and finding it wrong, it sounds more like not recognised type at compile time – Sayse Aug 29 '14 at 7:31
  • 3
    No it calls second version for me in both the tests. c# 5.0 compiler with .net 4.5 – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 29 '14 at 7:35
  • 2
    I just tried to reproduce this with .NET 4.5, C# 5. It goes to the second one for me. – Yuval Itzchakov Aug 29 '14 at 7:36
  • 2
    This doesn't reproduce in .NET 4.0 either. – Yuval Itzchakov Aug 29 '14 at 7:39
  • 1
    Sorry I tried to simplify the problem for this website and it seems that by simplifying it I get the correct behaviour. – Dommicentl Aug 29 '14 at 7:40
7

You need to either add a second overload of ExtendFunction:

private static Func<IEnumerable<T>> ExtendFunction<T> (Func<IEnumerable<T>> func) where T : class
{
    return () => Convert(func.Invoke());
}

Or make the first overload invoke Convert method dynamically:

private static Func<T> ExtendFunction<T> (Func<T> func) where T : class
{
    return () => Convert((dynamic)func.Invoke());
}

The reason is that your ExtendFunction method chooses Convert method at compile time. You can avoid that be either adding a second overload of ExtendFunction which chooses the Convert method you need, or by moving the choice of Convert method to run time.

4
  • 5
    Yes, it's compile time vs. runtime issue. OP has ExtendFunction with Func<T>, so the compiler cannot know that T will be of type IEnumerable<T> (the only constraint is where T : class). Can also be fixed by making ExtendFunction use Func<IEnumerable<T>> instead. – knittl Aug 29 '14 at 8:13
  • you said either, if I only add (dynamic) casting to existing Func<T> ExtendFunction without adding overload Func<IEnumerable<T>> ExtendFunction, it still goes to first method static T Convert – Yuliam Chandra Aug 29 '14 at 8:43
  • The dynamic method seems the way to go for me however if I try it, it does not work. It still goed to the first function? – Dommicentl Aug 29 '14 at 8:43
  • 1
    @Vogabe Well, now the issue from the question Generic extension method resolution fails, which was mentioned below, becomes important, because T is preffered over IEnumerable<T> when passing List<T>. You can replace AsEnumerable() with Select(x => x) to get the behavior you want. – Athari Aug 29 '14 at 9:00
0

In C#, the closest to specialization is to use a more-specific overload; however this works only when the type is know at compile time.

In your case the type is decided at run time because of IEnumerable<T>, but the compiler cannot guarantee that it will be IEnumerable<T>. If you add this line in your main method you'll get the second function called. Convert(text: new List<string>().AsEnumerable());

this is because the type is know at compile time

so try your Main in this way and look the differences

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   Func<IEnumerable<string>> stringFunction = () => new List<string>().AsEnumerable();
   InvokeFunction(ExtendFunction(stringFunction));//first function invoked
   Convert(text: new List<string>().AsEnumerable());//second function invoked
}
2
  • The return type of func.Invoke() is known at compile time. But at compile time it is T (where T : class) and not IEnumerable<T>. The concrete type of T might be IEnumerable<T>, but the compiler cannot guarantee that. – knittl Aug 29 '14 at 8:51
  • @knittl Thanks, I'll try to explain it in a better way – faby Aug 29 '14 at 9:07
-1

I had the same problem a few weeks ago. You can solve this by specifying the type explicitely on calling the method but that's not really worth it, because it means everybody using your methods have to know about this fact.

We solved our problem by actually giving the method another name. In your case, that would be a second method named:

public static IEnumerable<T> TranslateAll<T>(IEnumerable<T> entities)
8
  • But.. This is not extension method and also we can't reproduce the problem though. – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 29 '14 at 7:39
  • 1
    Well, an extension method is just a method. The problem that the "wrong" method is picked is still the same, regardless of this keyword in his or my signature. If you cannot reproduce in VS2013 that's great. I can assure you it's reproducable in VS2012. – nvoigt Aug 29 '14 at 7:40
  • 2
    FYI am using VS2012 only. Can't able to reproduce. Also your linked question seems to be a different problem which I'll try to answer in a moment. – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 29 '14 at 7:42
  • 1
    @nvoigt What does the VS version have to do with anything? it varies based on the target .NET framework version. – Yuval Itzchakov Aug 29 '14 at 7:42
  • 1
    I've answered your linked question, take a look at it and let me know if am missing something. FWIW I didn't downvoted your answer. – Sriram Sakthivel Aug 29 '14 at 8:09

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