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I want to activate c99 mode in gcc compiler to i read in other post in this forum that -std should be equal to -std=c99 but i don't know how to set it to this value using command line so please help.

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  • 2
    append your command with -std=c99 ;) – Tymoteusz Paul Aug 29 '14 at 10:39
  • How do you specify the name of the executable? – jxh Aug 29 '14 at 10:41
  • Use the command c99 to compile programs written in the language C99 ;-) – Marc Glisse Oct 22 '16 at 6:57
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Compile using:

gcc -std=c99 -o outputfile sourcefile.c

gcc --help lists some options, for a full list of options refer to the manual. The different options for C dialect can be found here.

As you are using make you can set the command line options for gcc using CFLAGS:

# sample makefile
CC = gcc
CFLAGS = -Wall -std=c99
OUTFILE = outputfile
OBJS = source.o
SRCS = source.c

$(OUTFILE): $(OBJS)
        $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -o $(OUTFILE) $(OBJS)
$(OBJS): $(SRCS)
        $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -c $(SRCS)

Addendum (added late 2016): C99 is getting kind of old by now, people looking at this answer might want to explore C11 instead.

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  • thanks but does this replace make because i always use make to compile all my programs ? – user297904 Aug 29 '14 at 10:51
  • @user297904 No, if you use a makefile you should set the options in it instead. I'll update my answer with an example. – jpw Aug 29 '14 at 10:54
  • thanks for the update one last question should write into terminal or inside of configuration file of make and where is the configuration file of make ? – user297904 Aug 29 '14 at 11:18
  • @user297904 When you use make you have a makefile that tells make what to do when you invoke it. The sample I added is a basic makefile that compiles a c-file named source.c in the same directory and creates an executable file called outputfile – jpw Aug 29 '14 at 11:20
  • Two years after I wrote this I still get some upvotes, which of course is nice, but it might time to leave C99 behind and move on to newer standards (ie. using -std=c11 for C11 instead). – jpw Oct 22 '16 at 0:17
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You may try to use the -std=c99 flag.

Try to complile like this:

gcc -Wall -std=c99 -g myProgram.c

Also note that -g is for debugging option(Thanks Alter Mann for pointing that).

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2

Based on the comments under another answer, perhaps you are using the implicit make rules and don't have a Makefile. If this, then you are just runing make tst to generate tst binary from tst.c. In that case you can specify the flags by setting the environment variable CFLAGS. You can set it for the current shell, or add it to your ~/.bashrc to have it always, with this:

export CFLAGS='-Wall -Wextra -std=c99'

Or specifying it just for the single command:

CFLAGS='-Wall -Wextra -std=c99' make tst

(Note: I added warning flags too, you should really use them, they will detect a lot of potential bugs or just bad code you should write differently.)

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