40

I want to write this

write!(f, "{ hash:{}, subject: {} }", self.hash, self.subject)

But since curly braces have special meaning for formatting it's clear that I can't place the outer curly braces like that without escaping. So I tried to escape them.

write!(f, "\{ hash:{}, subject: {} \}", self.hash, self.subject)

Rust doesn't like that either. Then I read this:

The literal characters {, }, or # may be included in a string by preceding them with the \ character. Since \ is already an escape character in Rust strings, a string literal using this escape will look like "\{".

So I tried

write!(f, "\\{ hash:{}, subject: {} \\}", self.hash, self.subject)

But that's also not working. :-(

  • 1
    What do you mean by 'not working'? Is it a runtime error (i.e. output you don't expect), or a compile time error? – huon Aug 29 '14 at 14:04
  • It was a compile time error. But it's resolved with the answer by nos. – Christoph Aug 29 '14 at 14:20
  • Oh, in future, please include compiler output, and preferably the version. This is especially important for Rust since the compiler can change dramatically; which is the case here, the behaviour on master (which I guess is the docs you were reading), differs to 0.11. – huon Aug 29 '14 at 23:55
  • Yes, you are right. Sloppy me :) – Christoph Aug 30 '14 at 12:17
61

You might be reading some out of date docs (e.g. for Rust 0.9)

As of Rust 1.0, the way to escape { and } is with another { or }

write!(f, "{{ hash:{}, subject: {} }}", self.hash, self.subject)

The literal characters { and } may be included in a string by preceding them with the same character. For example, the { character is escaped with {{ and the } character is escaped with }}.

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