70

Is there a way to do this? I cannot seem an easy way to interface pandas series with plotting a CDF.

4
  • 2
    Could you define your problem? What's the input and output? scipy.stats have the cdf functions you might be interested in.
    – K.Chen
    Aug 29, 2014 at 23:17
  • 7
    There was a feature request for this, but it's outside pandas' domain. Use seaborn's kdeplot with cumulative=True Aug 29, 2014 at 23:23
  • Input is a series, output is a plot of a CDF function. Aug 31, 2014 at 2:31
  • 2
    When I check out seaborn, I get this error "Cumulative distributions are currentlyonly implemented in statsmodels.Please install statsmodels. " Aug 31, 2014 at 2:46

11 Answers 11

95

I believe the functionality you're looking for is in the hist method of a Series object which wraps the hist() function in matplotlib

Here's the relevant documentation

In [10]: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

In [11]: plt.hist?
...
Plot a histogram.

Compute and draw the histogram of *x*. The return value is a
tuple (*n*, *bins*, *patches*) or ([*n0*, *n1*, ...], *bins*,
[*patches0*, *patches1*,...]) if the input contains multiple
data.
...
cumulative : boolean, optional, default : False
    If `True`, then a histogram is computed where each bin gives the
    counts in that bin plus all bins for smaller values. The last bin
    gives the total number of datapoints.  If `normed` is also `True`
    then the histogram is normalized such that the last bin equals 1.
    If `cumulative` evaluates to less than 0 (e.g., -1), the direction
    of accumulation is reversed.  In this case, if `normed` is also
    `True`, then the histogram is normalized such that the first bin
    equals 1.

...

For example

In [12]: import pandas as pd

In [13]: import numpy as np

In [14]: ser = pd.Series(np.random.normal(size=1000))

In [15]: ser.hist(cumulative=True, density=1, bins=100)
Out[15]: <matplotlib.axes.AxesSubplot at 0x11469a590>

In [16]: plt.show()
2
  • 1
    Is there a way to just get the step function and not have the bars filled in? Oct 20, 2014 at 15:27
  • 9
    That'd be histtype='step' which is also in the pyplot.hist documentation truncated above
    – Dan Frank
    Oct 21, 2014 at 15:59
56

In case you are also interested in the values, not just the plot.

import pandas as pd

# If you are in jupyter
%matplotlib inline

This will always work (discrete and continuous distributions)

# Define your series
s = pd.Series([9, 5, 3, 5, 5, 4, 6, 5, 5, 8, 7], name = 'value')
df = pd.DataFrame(s)
# Get the frequency, PDF and CDF for each value in the series

# Frequency
stats_df = df \
.groupby('value') \
['value'] \
.agg('count') \
.pipe(pd.DataFrame) \
.rename(columns = {'value': 'frequency'})

# PDF
stats_df['pdf'] = stats_df['frequency'] / sum(stats_df['frequency'])

# CDF
stats_df['cdf'] = stats_df['pdf'].cumsum()
stats_df = stats_df.reset_index()
stats_df

enter image description here

# Plot the discrete Probability Mass Function and CDF.
# Technically, the 'pdf label in the legend and the table the should be 'pmf'
# (Probability Mass Function) since the distribution is discrete.

# If you don't have too many values / usually discrete case
stats_df.plot.bar(x = 'value', y = ['pdf', 'cdf'], grid = True)

enter image description here

Alternative example with a sample drawn from a continuous distribution or you have a lot of individual values:

# Define your series
s = pd.Series(np.random.normal(loc = 10, scale = 0.1, size = 1000), name = 'value')
# ... all the same calculation stuff to get the frequency, PDF, CDF
# Plot
stats_df.plot(x = 'value', y = ['pdf', 'cdf'], grid = True)

enter image description here

For continuous distributions only

Please note if it is very reasonable to make the assumption that there is only one occurence of each value in the sample (typically encountered in the case of continuous distributions) then the groupby() + agg('count') is not necessary (since the count is always 1).

In this case, a percent rank can be used to get to the cdf directly.

Use your best judgment when taking this kind of shortcut! :)

# Define your series
s = pd.Series(np.random.normal(loc = 10, scale = 0.1, size = 1000), name = 'value')
df = pd.DataFrame(s)
# Get to the CDF directly
df['cdf'] = df.rank(method = 'average', pct = True)
# Sort and plot
df.sort_values('value').plot(x = 'value', y = 'cdf', grid = True)

enter image description here

4
  • 2
    That's answer it's very detailed and helpful. Mar 27, 2019 at 2:46
  • 1
    This is helpful indeed. Thank you! Jan 4, 2022 at 17:30
  • How do I define the number of bins in this answer?
    – MrT77
    Aug 22, 2022 at 10:04
  • 1
    There are no bins to be defined. No histogram here if that is what you are thinking.
    – Raphvanns
    Aug 23, 2022 at 13:55
20

I came here looking for a plot like this with bars and a CDF line: enter image description here

It can be achieved like this:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
series = pd.Series(np.random.normal(size=10000))
fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax2 = ax.twinx()
n, bins, patches = ax.hist(series, bins=100, normed=False)
n, bins, patches = ax2.hist(
    series, cumulative=1, histtype='step', bins=100, color='tab:orange')
plt.savefig('test.png')

If you want to remove the vertical line, then it's explained how to accomplish that here. Or you could just do:

ax.set_xlim((ax.get_xlim()[0], series.max()))

I also saw an elegant solution here on how to do it with seaborn.

2
  • maybe the second axis should be in percentage (between 0 - 1)
    – skibee
    Feb 3, 2021 at 17:20
  • @skibee That's a good suggestion. Feel free to edit the answer. Feb 6, 2021 at 6:13
16

A CDF or cumulative distribution function plot is basically a graph with on the X-axis the sorted values and on the Y-axis the cumulative distribution. So, I would create a new series with the sorted values as index and the cumulative distribution as values.

First create an example series:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
ser = pd.Series(np.random.normal(size=100))

Sort the series:

ser = ser.sort_values()

Now, before proceeding, append again the last (and largest) value. This step is important especially for small sample sizes in order to get an unbiased CDF:

ser[len(ser)] = ser.iloc[-1]

Create a new series with the sorted values as index and the cumulative distribution as values:

cum_dist = np.linspace(0.,1.,len(ser))
ser_cdf = pd.Series(cum_dist, index=ser)

Finally, plot the function as steps:

ser_cdf.plot(drawstyle='steps')
3
  • 7
    Why is it necessary to append the last value? Apr 1, 2016 at 20:55
  • 1
    order is deprecated. Use ser.sort_values().
    – Lukas
    May 10, 2016 at 15:54
  • @kadee ser[len(ser)] = ser.iloc[-1] does not work on pandas 0.19
    – jlandercy
    Dec 16, 2016 at 20:10
14

This is the easiest way.

import pandas as pd
df = pd.Series([i for i in range(100)])
df.hist( cumulative = True )

Image of cumulative histogram

0
7

I found another solution in "pure" Pandas, that does not require specifying the number of bins to use in a histogram:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np # used only to create example data

series = pd.Series(np.random.normal(size=10000))

cdf = series.value_counts().sort_index().cumsum()
cdf.plot()
1
  • 2
    Nice answer! but cdf should be from 0 to 1; I'd change to cdf=series.value_counts().sort_index().cumsum() / series.shape[0] Jun 16, 2020 at 12:13
4

Upgrading the answer of @wroscoe

df[your_column].plot(kind = 'hist', histtype = 'step', density = True, cumulative = True)

You can also provide a number of desired bins.

2

To me, this seemed like a simply way to do it:

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

heights = pd.Series(np.random.normal(size=100))

# empirical CDF
def F(x,data):
    return float(len(data[data <= x]))/len(data)

vF = np.vectorize(F, excluded=['data'])

plt.plot(np.sort(heights),vF(x=np.sort(heights), data=heights))
1

If you're looking to plot a "true" empirical CDF, which jumps exactly at the values of your data set a, and with the jump at each value proportional to the frequency of the value, NumPy has builtin functions to do the work:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

def ecdf(a):
    x, counts = np.unique(a, return_counts=True)
    y = np.cumsum(counts)
    x = np.insert(x, 0, x[0])
    y = np.insert(y/y[-1], 0, 0.)
    plt.plot(x, y, drawstyle='steps-post')
    plt.grid(True)
    plt.savefig('ecdf.png')

The call to unique() returns the data values in sorted order along with their corresponding frequencies. The option drawstyle='steps-post' in the plot() call ensures that the jumps occur where they should. To force a jump at the smallest data value, the code inserts an additional element in front of x and y.

Example usage:

xvec = np.array([7,1,2,2,7,4,4,4,5.5,7])
ecdf(xvec)

Another usage:

df = pd.DataFrame({'x':[7,1,2,2,7,4,4,4,5.5,7]})
ecdf(df['x'])

with output:

enter image description here

1

I really like the answer by Raphvanns. It is helpful because it not only produces the plot, but it also helps me understand what pdf, cdf, and ccdf is.

I have two things to add to Raphvanns's solution: (1) use collections.Counter wisely to make the process easier; (2) remember to sort (assending) value before calculating pdf, cdf, and ccdf.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from collections import Counter

Generate random numbers:

s = pd.Series(np.random.randint(1000, size=(1000)))

Build a dataframe as Raphvanns suggested:

dic = dict(Counter(s))
df = pd.DataFrame(s.items(), columns = ['value', 'frequency'])

Calculate PDF, CDF, and CCDF:

df['pdf'] = df.frequency/sum(df.frequency)
df['cdf'] = df['pdf'].cumsum()
df['ccdf'] = 1-df['cdf']

Plot:

df.plot(x = 'value', y = ['cdf', 'ccdf'], grid = True)

enter image description here

You may wonder why we have to sort the value before calculating PDF, CDF, and CCDF. Well, let's say what would the results be if we don't sort them (note that dict(Counter(s)) automatically sorted the items, we will make the order random in the following).

dic = dict(Counter(s))
df = pd.DataFrame(s.items(), columns = ['value', 'frequency'])

# randomize the order of `value`:
df = df.sample(n=1000)

df['pdf'] = df.frequency/sum(df.frequency)
df['cdf'] = df['pdf'].cumsum()
df['ccdf'] = 1-df['cdf']

df.plot(x = 'value', y = ['cdf'], grid = True)

This is the plot:

enter image description here

Why did it happen? Well, the essence of CDF is "The number of data points we have seen so far", citing YY's lecture slides of his Data Visualization class. Therefore, if the order of value is not sorted (either ascending or descending is fine), then when you plot, where x axis is in ascending order, the y value of course will be just a mess.

If you apply a descending order, you can imagine that the CDF and CCDF will just swap their places:

enter image description here

I will leave a question to the readers of this post: if I randomize the order of value like above, will sorting value after (rather than before) calculating PDF, CDF, and CCDF solve the problem?

dic = dict(Counter(s))
df = pd.DataFrame(s.items(), columns = ['value', 'frequency'])

# randomize the order of `value`:
df = df.sample(n=1000)

df['pdf'] = df.frequency/sum(df.frequency)
df['cdf'] = df['pdf'].cumsum()
df['ccdf'] = 1-df['cdf']

# Will this solve the problem?
df = df.sort_values(by='value')

df.plot(x = 'value', y = ['cdf'], grid = True)
1

It doesn't have to be complex. All it takes is:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

x = series.dropna().sort_values()
y = np.linspace(0, 1, len(x))
plt.plot(x, y)

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