34

I'm using several enum-based state machines in my Android application. While these work very well, what I am looking for is a suggestion for how to elegantly receive events, typically from registered callbacks or from eventbus messages, into the currently active state. Of the many blogs and tutorials concerning enum-based FSMs, most of them give examples of state machines that consume data (e.g. parsers) rather than show how these FSMs may be driven from events.

A typical state machine I'm using has this form:

private State mState;

public enum State {

    SOME_STATE {


        init() {
         ... 
        }


        process() {
         ... 
        }


    },


    ANOTHER_STATE {

        init() {
         ... 
        }

        process() {
         ... 
        }

    }

}

...

In my situation, some of the states trigger a piece of work to be done on a particular object, registering a listener. That object asynchronously calls back when the work is done. In other words, just a simple callback interface.

Similarly, I have an EventBus. Classes wanting to be notified of events again implement a callback interface and listen() for those event types on the EventBus.

The basic problem therefore is that the state machine, or its individual states, or the class containing the enum FSM, or something has to implement those callback interfaces, so that they can represent events on the current state.

One approach I have used is for the entire enum to implement the callback interface(s). The enum itself has default implementations of the callback methods at the bottom, and the individual states can then override those callback methods for events they're interested in. For this to work, each state must register and unregister as it enters and exits, otherwise there is risk of the callback happening on a state that isn't the current state. I will probably stick with this if I find nothing better.

Another way is for the containing class to implement the callbacks. It then has to delegate those events on to the state machine, by calling mState.process( event ). That means I'd need to enumerate event types. For example:

enum Events {
    SOMETHING_HAPPENED,
    ...
}

...

onSometingHappened() {

    mState.process( SOMETHING_HAPPENED );
}

I don't like this however because (a) I'd have the uglyness of needing to switch on the event types within the process(event) of each state, and (b) passing through additional parameters looks awkward.

I would like a suggestion for an elegant solution for this without resorting to using a library.

2
  • Elegant in what way? What aspect of the previous solutions would you like improved? – meriton Jan 5 '15 at 19:36
  • Hi meriton! Good point; I ought to amend the question to clarify. What I envisaged was a situation where the actual enums themselves could implement the listener interfaces in such a way that avoids need to listen and dispatch events onwards from the outer context to the current state enum. In other words, is there a way to avoid effectively defining and listening on events twice over. I realise this is an unrealistic or impossible ask. Although some clever ideas have been put forward (such as dudeprgm's), I'm leaning towards staying with the current code which is based on your answer. – Trevor Jan 5 '15 at 19:53
17

So you want to dispatch events to their handlers for the current state.

To dispatch to the current state, subscribing each state as it becomes active, and unsubscribing it as it becomes inactive is rather cumbersome. It is easier to subscribe an object that knows the active state, and simply delegates all events to the active state.

To distinguish events, you can use separate event objects, and then distinguish them with the visitor pattern, but that's quite a bit of boilerplate code. I'd only do this if I have other code that treats all events the same (for instance, if events must be buffered before delivery). Otherwise, I'd simply do something like

interface StateEventListener {
    void onEventX();
    void onEventY(int x, int y);
    void onEventZ(String s);
}

enum State implements StateEventListener {
    initialState {
        @Override public void onEventX() {
            // do whatever
        }
        // same for other events
    },
    // same for other states
}

class StateMachine implements StateEventListener {
    State currentState;

    @Override public void onEventX() {
        currentState.onEventX();
    }

    @Override public void onEventY(int x, int y) {
        currentState.onEventY(x, y);
    }

    @Override public void onEventZ(String s) {
        currentState.onEventZ(s);
    }
}

Edit

If you have many event types, it might be better to generate the boring delegation code at runtime using a bytecode engineering library, or even a plain JDK proxy:

class StateMachine2 {
    State currentState;

    final StateEventListener stateEventPublisher = buildStateEventForwarder(); 

    StateEventListener buildStateEventForwarder() {
        Class<?>[] interfaces = {StateEventListener.class};
        return (StateEventListener) Proxy.newProxyInstance(getClass().getClassLoader(), interfaces, new InvocationHandler() {
            @Override
            public Object invoke(Object proxy, Method method, Object[] args) throws Throwable {
                try {
                    return method.invoke(currentState, args);
                } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
                    throw e.getCause();
                }
            }
        });
    }
}

This makes the code less readable, but does eliminate the need to write delegation code for each event type.

5
  • Thank you - much appreciated. You've got me thinking now - I'm wondering if, instead of manually writing class StateMachine to implement the same interfaces and delegate events forward to currentState, could it be possible to automate this using reflection (or something). Example: each enum state could have a method registerForEventTypes which returns listener classes it's interested in. Then the outer class would register as a listener for those classes at runtime and delegate them on, and register/unregister the state as it enters/exits. (Ignore me, just thinking out loud here.) – Trevor Aug 30 '14 at 10:55
  • It would probably be easier to always deliver events, and provide a default implementation of the listener methods that does nothing. And yes, you could use byte code generation to automate writing the delegation methods, for instance with a java.lang.reflect.Proxy, or a full fledged byte code engineering library such as Javassist. For less than a dozen event types however, it is probably easier and clearer to write the code by hand. – meriton Aug 30 '14 at 11:55
  • Isn't using a proxy and invoking methods using reflection going to be slow, especially on a mobile Android device? – user837703 Jan 6 '15 at 2:52
  • That depends on how often such state transitions occur. I'd expect you could forward millions of state transitions per second using this approach. – meriton Jan 6 '15 at 19:31
  • Minor points: In your StateMachine, you'll want to 1) implement StateEventListener and 2) make the methods public in both the State and StateMachine – vphilipnyc Mar 29 '16 at 17:35
26
+100

Why not have events call the right callback on state directly?

public enum State {
   abstract State processFoo();
   abstract State processBar();
   State processBat() { return this; } // A default implementation, so that states that do not use this event do not have to implement it anyway.
   ...
   State1 {
     State processFoo() { return State2; }
     ...
   },
   State2 {
      State processFoo() { return State1; }
      ...
   } 
}

public enum  Event {
   abstract State dispatch(State state);
   Foo {
      State dispatch(State s) { return s.processFoo(); }
   },
   Bar {
      State dispatch(State s) { return s.processBar(); }
   }
   ...
}

This addresses both of your reservations with the original approach: no "ugly" switch, and no "awkward" additional parameters.

2
  • This comes to the same thing as @meriton's answer. All states must implement all events, even if the don't use them. This is what the OP was trying to avoid. – user837703 Jan 5 '15 at 14:52
  • 2
    Not really. You can provide a default implementation for that. I'll edit my answer to reflect this. – Dima Jan 5 '15 at 14:53
7

You are on good tracks, you should use a Strategy pattern combined with your state machine. Implement event handling in your state enum, providing a default common implementation and possibly add specific implementations.

Define your events and the associated strategy interface :

enum Event
{
    EVENT_X,
    EVENT_Y,
    EVENT_Z;
    // Other events...
}

interface EventStrategy
{
    public void onEventX();
    public void onEventY();
    public void onEventZ();
    // Other events...
}

Then, in your State enum :

enum State implements EventStrategy
{
    STATE_A
    {
        @Override
        public void onEventX()
        {
            System.out.println("[STATE_A] Specific implementation for event X");
        }
    },

    STATE_B
    {
        @Override
        public void onEventY()
        {
            System.out.println("[STATE_B] Default implementation for event Y");     
        }

        public void onEventZ()
        {
            System.out.println("[STATE_B] Default implementation for event Z");
        }
    };
    // Other states...      

    public void process(Event e)
    {
        try
        {
            // Google Guava is used here
            Method listener = this.getClass().getMethod("on" + CaseFormat.UPPER_UNDERSCORE.to(CaseFormat.UPPER_CAMEL, e.name()));
            listener.invoke(this);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Missing event handling or something went wrong
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("The event " + e.name() + " is not handled in the state machine", ex);
        }
    }

    // Default implementations

    public void onEventX()
    {
        System.out.println("Default implementation for event X");
    }

    public void onEventY()
    {
        System.out.println("Default implementation for event Y");       
    }

    public void onEventZ()
    {
        System.out.println("Default implementation for event Z");
    }
}

According to EventStrategy, there is a default implementation for all events. Moreover, for each state, a specific implementation, for a different event handling, is possible.

The StateMachine would look like that :

class StateMachine
{
    // Active state
    State mState;

    // All the code about state change

    public void onEvent(Event e)
    {
        mState.process(e);
    }
}

In this scenario, you trust mState being the current active state, all events are applied on this state only. If you want to add a security layer, to disable all events for all non active states, you can do it but in my opinion, it's not a good pattern, it's not up to a State to know if it's active but it's StateMachine job.

0
5

It's not clear to me why you need a callback interface when you already have an event bus. The bus should be able to deliver events to listeners based on the event type without the need for interfaces. Consider an architecture like Guava's (I know you don't want to resort to external libraries, it's the design what I want to bring to your attention).

enum State {
  S1 {
    @Subscribe void on(EventX ex) { ... }
  },
  S2 {
    @Subscribe void on(EventY ey) { ... }
  }
}

// when a state becomes active
eventBus.register(currentState);
eventBus.unregister(previousState);

I believe this approach goes along the lines of your first comment to meriton's answer:

Instead of manually writing class StateMachine to implement the same interfaces and delegate events forward to currentState, it could be possible to automate this using reflection (or something). Then the outer class would register as a listener for those classes at runtime and delegate them on, and register/unregister the state as it enters/exits.

4

You may want to try using the Command pattern: the Command interface corresponds to something like your "SOMETHING_HAPPENED". Each enum value, then, is instantiated with a particular command, which may be instantiated via Reflection and can run the execute method (defined in the Command interface).

If useful, consider also the State pattern.

If commands are complex, consider also the Composite pattern.

1
  • Thanks Manu. I will look into these patterns and suggestions now. – Trevor Aug 30 '14 at 10:56
4

An alternative for Java 8 might be to use an interface with default methods, like this:

public interface IPositionFSM {

    default IPositionFSM processFoo() {
        return this;
    }

    default IPositionFSM processBar() {
        return this;
    }
}

public enum PositionFSM implements IPositionFSM {
    State1 {
        @Override
        public IPositionFSM processFoo() {
            return State2;
        }
    },
    State2 {
        @Override
        public IPositionFSM processBar() {
            return State1;
        }
    };
}
3

How about implementing event handling with Visitors:

import java.util.LinkedHashMap;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

public class StateMachine {
    interface Visitor {
        void visited(State state);
    }

    enum State {
        // a to A, b to B
        A('a',"A",'b',"B"),
        // b to B, b is an end-state
        B('b',"B") {
            @Override
            public boolean endState() { return true; }
        },
        ;

        private final Map<Character,String> transitions = new LinkedHashMap<>();

        private State(Object...transitions) {
            for(int i=0;i<transitions.length;i+=2)
                this.transitions.put((Character) transitions[i], (String) transitions[i+1]);
        }
        private State transition(char c) {
            if(!transitions.containsKey(c))
                throw new IllegalStateException("no transition from "+this+" for "+c);
            return State.valueOf(transitions.get(c)).visit();
        }
        private State visit() {
            for(Visitor visitor : visitors)
                visitor.visited(this);
            return this;
        }
        public boolean endState() { return false; }
        private final List<Visitor> visitors = new LinkedList<>();
        public final void addVisitor(Visitor visitor) {
            visitors.add(visitor);
        }
        public State process(String input) {
            State state = this;
            for(char c : input.toCharArray())
                state = state.transition(c);
            return state;
        } 
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        String input = "aabbbb";

        Visitor commonVisitor = new Visitor() {
            @Override
            public void visited(State state) {
                System.out.println("visited "+state);
            }
        };

        State.A.addVisitor(commonVisitor);
        State.B.addVisitor(commonVisitor);

        State state = State.A.process(input);

        System.out.println("endState = "+state.endState());
    }
}

The state-diagram definition and event-handling code look rather minimal in my opinion. :) And, with a little more work, it can be made to work with a generic input type.

0

Simple example if you do not have events and just need next status public enum LeaveRequestState {

    Submitted {
        @Override
        public LeaveRequestState nextState() {
            return Escalated;
        }

        @Override
        public String responsiblePerson() {
            return "Employee";
        }
    },
    Escalated {
        @Override
        public LeaveRequestState nextState() {
            return Approved;
        }

        @Override
        public String responsiblePerson() {
            return "Team Leader";
        }
    },
    Approved {
        @Override
        public LeaveRequestState nextState() {
            return this;
        }

        @Override
        public String responsiblePerson() {
            return "Department Manager";
        }
    };

    public abstract LeaveRequestState nextState(); 
    public abstract String responsiblePerson();
}

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