3

I know relative imports are not suggested, such as quoted from PEP8:

Relative imports for intra-package imports are highly discouraged. Always use the absolute package path for all imports. Even now that PEP 328 is fully implemented in Python 2.5, its style of explicit relative imports is actively discouraged; absolute imports are more portable and usually more readable.

What if I am developing a package (with several modules)? While in development, absolute import won't work w/o installing/deploying the package. Does that mean I have to periodically install/deploy the current WIP modules just for testing?

Here is an example provided by Cld. Given a Python project/package:

myproject/
  package1/
     __init__.py
     somemodule.py
  package2/
     __init__.py
     somemodule.py
     somescript.py
main.py

In main.py, absolute-import works quite well:

import package1
import package2.somescript
import package2.somemodule

However, for modules, like somescript.py in package2, the following absolute-imports:

import package2.somemodule
import package1

It would raise ImportError:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "package2/somescript.py", line 1, in <module>
    import package2.somemodule
ImportError: No module named package2.somemodule
  • One approach you can take is to include the root of your project in the PYTHONPATH environment variable. Then all your imports can be "absolute" (i.e. relative to the root of your project). – arghbleargh Aug 30 '14 at 15:24
  • That might be a solution. – Drake Guan Aug 30 '14 at 16:45
2

Depand where you 'main' file is.

if you have:

myproject/
  package1/
     __init__.py
     somemodule.py
  package2/
     __init__.py
     somemodule.py
     somescript.py
main.py

somescript.py:

import package2.somemodule
import package1

main.py

import package1
import package2.somescript
import package2.somemodule

If you execute: python package2/somescript.py you get an error

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "package2/somescript.py", line 1, in <module>
    import package2.somemodule
ImportError: No module named package2.somemodule

But if you execute python main.py, you get no problem.

  • Thanks for this clear example. Therefore, how could I handle absolute imports in sub-modules, like somescript.py in your example? – Drake Guan Aug 30 '14 at 16:44
  • adding import os, sys; sys.path.append(os.path.abspath(os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), os.path.pardir))); at the begin of somescript.py maybe... But really dirty... – Cld Aug 30 '14 at 16:58
  • Not a good idea because you have to comment them out when deploying, which increases the complexity of develop-test-deploy cycle. – Drake Guan Aug 30 '14 at 17:14

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