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I am trying to draw the path of a bicycle front wheel while only the bezier curve of the rear wheel is known. Now, I think I know how to get the formula, but the answer must be a (set of) Bezier curve(s). I'm guessing that, if the rear wheel path is a Bezier curve, the front wheel path is not neccessary one. So probably I will have to recurively approximate it using more than one curve ?

I want to view the result in SVG.

Please try to explain in small steps since my math is a bit rusty after 26years...

To get an idea of what I'm talking about, look at: Bicycle wheel path example

Some background information may be helpful here: I'm trying to build a plugin for Inkscape that calculates the path that a CNC machine should follow when moving a swivel knife with a given offset. This is similar to having a known bicycle rear wheel path and trying to derive its front wheel path from that. So, the input is an SVG file with paths in it (the shapes I want to cut) and the output is the same file with extra SVG paths added to it (the paths the CNC machine should follow in order to cut the desired shapes with a swivel-knife).

The funny thing is that the bicycle will start it's ride driving along the line that is exactly parallel to the line between the starting point and its control point and will end its ride exactly parallel to the line between the end point of the Bezier curve and its control point. It's what's happening between these points that seems to be out of my control...

  • What is the curve for the rear wheel? – cpburnz Aug 30 '14 at 15:27
  • Have a look at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cycloid thats the point traced by a point on the circumference. – Salix alba Aug 30 '14 at 15:34
  • @Salix alba: I clearified what I mean with wheel path. It is not the Cycloid. Its the track it leaves in the sand... – Bigman74066 Aug 30 '14 at 16:22
  • If you only know the back tire path, you can't calculate the front tire track exactly. The front and back tire tracks are related, but not in a calculable way. If you have points along the front path you can use a spline to approximate & draw that path: github.com/epistemex/cardinal-spline-js. As you've supposed, a spline is indeed a series of curves. – markE Aug 30 '14 at 16:59
  • @MarkE: I'm not sure that you are right about not being able to find the front wheel path of the bike. Assuming the front wheel is at a fixed distance from the rear wheel and that it is always on the tangent line that can be drawn along the rear path you should be able to find the front wheel path... (I think) – Bigman74066 Aug 30 '14 at 18:12
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GOT IT !

I think I found an elegant solution to this problem after carefully reviewing the primer that KIKO showed me. Look at paragraph 6 (De Casteljau algorithm)

Note that the green line is tangent to the Bezier curve. We can use it to represent the frame (with length L) of the bicycle (which is always parallel to this line). This makes it very easy to draw the front wheel path.

But I need the front wheel path in the form of Bezier curves…

Step1: Duplicate the first Bezier curve and modify it so that the first 2 control points (p1 and p2 in the example) are offset with length L parallel to line(p1,p2). Do the same thing with P3 and P4. This Bezier will be our first estimation of the front wheel path. Step2: Start drawing the Bezier curves for the rear and the front wheel simultaneously keeping track of the difference between the calculated front wheel path and the estimated front wheel Bezier curve. If the difference becomes to big, split the estimated Bezier curve and adjust the new-formed control-point. Repeat this process until drawing is finished.

  • As a minor comment on the physics behind this problem: the solution is actually about modeling radial motion around a moving point, which means the "true" solution is (some form of) sinoid, which cannot be faithfully represented by Bezier curves. In practice, it's rarely a true sinoid, and the approximation that a Bezier curve gives you will do just fine. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Sep 1 '14 at 20:35
  • As a non-minor comment on the "correct answer" aspect of your own answer: it will be helpful to others if you show some demonstrator code (i.e. a Processing sketch or something), ideally as a jsfiddle or jsbin =) – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Sep 1 '14 at 20:36
  • @Bigman74066 - "it will be helpful to others if you show some demonstrator code" (Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans): I agree with that. – helloflash Sep 6 '14 at 8:30
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Perhaps you want: A Primer on Bézier Curves?

http://pomax.github.io/bezierinfo

Looks like a useful webpage to me. But from the link you gave I see it's just a phaseshifted curve with a somewhat higher amplitude. It's best to filter the back wheel data, in this way, to get the front wheel data. It all depends on the data you have for the back wheel.

  • Thanks for the link but you should probably have added this as a comment instead of an answer. – Bigman74066 Aug 30 '14 at 18:17
  • @Bigman74066: I think this is a good as it is gonna get. :-) If you want more help you should first do more work yourself. Give the format of the data you have, the data itself, and your attempt at a solution. MarkE is right that's a problem with no extact mathematical solution, hence my advice to approximate it. Most of the time that's good enough. – KIKO Software Aug 30 '14 at 19:43
  • OK, I'll have a go... – Bigman74066 Aug 30 '14 at 21:06
  • I'm trying to build a plugin for Inkscape that calculates the patch that a CNC machine should follow when moving a swivel knife with a given offset. This is similar to having a known bicycle rear wheel path and trying to derive its front wheel path from that. So, the input is an SVG file with paths in it (the shapes I want to cut) and the output is the same file with extra SVG paths added to it (the paths the CNC machine should follow in order to cut the desired shapes with a swivel-knife). – Bigman74066 Aug 30 '14 at 21:16
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Lets assume that we take the assumption "the front wheel is at a fixed distance from the rear wheel and that it is always on the tangent line" this make the problem tractable.

A Bézier curve is given by B(t)=(1-t)^3 P_0 +3(1-t)^2 t P_1 +3(1-t)t^2 P_2+t^3 P_3

the tangent can be found by differentiating

T = dB/dt = `-3 P_0 t^2+9 P_1 t^2-9 P_2 t^2+3 P_3 t^2+6 P_0 t-12 P_1 t+6 P_2 t-3 P_0+3 P_1

we can find a unit length normal N by finding N = T / sqrt(T.T). The curve we want it B(t) + a N. For some constant a. This won't be a nice expression. You are probably best calculating some points and fitting a curve. You might be able to use a CAS to do things algebraically.

  • Thanks Salix. My go at the solution got stuck around where the last paragraph of your answer starts. Somehow I have to convert B(t)+a.N into 1 or more new bezier curves (That's because the front wheel curve has to be put into an SVG file. SVG files work with Bezier curves. I cannot use polynoms in SVG files) – Bigman74066 Aug 30 '14 at 21:32
  • My 2 cents: The front path controls the angle of the back path. Front angle changes slightly before back angle changes. So perhaps a good approximation is to: (1) Calc the distance between the 2 tires where they touch the ground (var wheelbase) (2) Calc the change in angle (var angle1) of the back path over a short distance (var pt1 & pt2), (3) Assume the front tire yawed when the back path was at pt1, (4) Use trig to calc a point on the front path: frontX=pt1.x+wheelbaseMath.cos(angle1), frontY=pt1.y+wheelbaseMath.sin(angle1). Use a spline to create the front path thru the front points. – markE Aug 30 '14 at 21:35
  • Thanks MarkE. I am not sure I want to go that way because in the end I am still stuck with the problem of having to produce a Bezier curve for the front wheel path... AFIAK I cannot use splines in SVG. – Bigman74066 Aug 30 '14 at 21:41
  • No problem...A spline is a series of Quadratic curves. It's easy to convert Q-Curves to Cubic Bezier Curves--just set both C-Curve control points to the same value as the one Q-Curve control point. – markE Aug 30 '14 at 21:45
  • BTW, you can plug a spline into SVG. Just create a path containing a series of "Q" data commands ;-) – markE Aug 30 '14 at 21:48

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