2

I only started using Java Swing yesterday, so pardon me if this isn't a valid question. I've been trying to create a simple UI with a grid and a panel that allows the user to specify the size of dimensions of the grid.

I have two classes extending JPanel: GridSizePanel and GridBoxPanel. GridSizePanel specifies the title, border, labels and fields involved in designing the panel that allows the user to alter dimensions. GridBoxPanel displays the actual grid (adopted from here). GridSizePanel uses the GroupLayout as its LayoutManager and GridBoxPanel uses GridBagLayout. The parent JFrame class(MazeSolverInterface) which orchestrates these sub-panels uses GroupLayout as it's LayoutManager.

The problem is, if I only add the GridSizePanel to the MazeSolverInterface's GroupLayout, when I resize the window manually, I can see the GridSizePanel resizing automatically. All good.

But when I add the GridBoxPanel to the MazeSolverInterface, now when I resize the window manually, only the GridBoxPanel seems to resize. The GridSizePanel doesn't change dimension at all!

Here's my code so far:

GridSizePanel:

public class GridSizePanel extends JPanel implements PropertyChangeListener {


    public GridSizePanel() throws ParseException {

        // set the border properties
        TitledBorder title = BorderFactory.createTitledBorder("Grid Size");
        title.setTitleColor(Color.BLACK);
        title.setBorder(BorderFactory.createBevelBorder(BevelBorder.LOWERED,
                Color.DARK_GRAY, Color.GRAY));
        this.setBorder(title);

        // wire up the group layout and panel to
        // each other
        GroupLayout gl = new GroupLayout(this);
        this.setLayout(gl);

        // Turn on automatically adding gaps between components
        gl.setAutoCreateGaps(true);

        // Turn on automatically creating gaps between components that touch
        // the edge of the container and the container.
        gl.setAutoCreateContainerGaps(true);

        JLabel numRowsLabel = new JLabel("rows");
        JLabel numColsLabel = new JLabel("columns");

        MaskFormatter textMask = new MaskFormatter("##");
        textMask.setPlaceholder("16");
        JFormattedTextField rowsText = new JFormattedTextField(textMask);
        JFormattedTextField colsText = new JFormattedTextField(textMask);

        // configure the text fields
        rowsText.setColumns(50);
        colsText.setColumns(50);
        rowsText.addPropertyChangeListener("value", this);
        colsText.addPropertyChangeListener("value", this);

        GroupLayout.SequentialGroup horGroup = gl.createSequentialGroup();
        horGroup.addGroup(gl.createParallelGroup().addComponent(numRowsLabel).addComponent(numColsLabel))
                .addGroup(gl.createParallelGroup().addComponent(rowsText).addComponent(colsText));
        gl.setHorizontalGroup(horGroup);

        GroupLayout.SequentialGroup verGroup = gl.createSequentialGroup();
        verGroup.addGroup(gl.createParallelGroup(GroupLayout.Alignment.BASELINE).addComponent(numRowsLabel).addComponent(rowsText))
                .addGroup(gl.createParallelGroup(GroupLayout.Alignment.BASELINE).addComponent(numColsLabel).addComponent(colsText));
        gl.setVerticalGroup(verGroup);
    }

    //public GridSize getSize() {
    //    return new GridSize()
    //}

    @Override
    public void propertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent propertyChangeEvent) {
        // TODO: fill this with logic to relay grid dimensions to the model
    }
}

GridBoxPanel:

public class GridBoxPanel extends JPanel {

    public GridBoxPanel() {
        setLayout(new GridBagLayout());

        GridBagConstraints gbc = new GridBagConstraints();
        for (int row = 0; row < 32; row++) {
            for (int col = 0; col < 32; col++) {
                gbc.gridx = col;
                gbc.gridy = row;

                GridCell gridCell = new GridCell();
                Border border = null;
                if (row < 4) {
                    if (col < 4) {
                        border = new MatteBorder(1, 1, 0, 0, Color.GRAY);
                    } else {
                        border = new MatteBorder(1, 1, 0, 1, Color.GRAY);
                    }
                } else {
                    if (col < 4) {
                        border = new MatteBorder(1, 1, 1, 0, Color.GRAY);
                    } else {
                        border = new MatteBorder(1, 1, 1, 1, Color.GRAY);
                    }
                }
                gridCell.setBorder(border);
                add(gridCell, gbc);
            }
        }
    }
}

MazeSolverInterface:

public class MazeSolverInterface extends JFrame {

    public MazeSolverInterface(String[] args) throws ParseException {
        checkArgs(args);
        initMaze(args);
    }

    public void initMaze(String[] args) throws ParseException {
        Container pane = getContentPane();
        GroupLayout gl = new GroupLayout(pane);
        pane.setLayout(gl);

        gl.setAutoCreateContainerGaps(true);

        // create required panels to integrate
        GridSizePanel gridSizeComponent = new GridSizePanel();
        GridBoxPanel gridDrawComponent = new GridBoxPanel();

        gl.setHorizontalGroup(gl.createSequentialGroup().addComponent(gridDrawComponent).addGap(50).addComponent(gridSizeComponent));
        gl.setVerticalGroup(gl.createParallelGroup().addComponent(gridDrawComponent).addGap(50).addComponent(gridSizeComponent));
        pack();

        setTitle("v0.0.1");
        setSize(700, 700);  // TODO: change to something configurable
        setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    }

    public void checkArgs(String[] args) {
        // TODO: fill with logic to check valid arguments (initial window dimensions)
    }
}

Main:

public class Main {

    public static void main(final String[] args) {

        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                MazeSolverInterface ex = null;
                try {
                    ex = new MazeSolverInterface(args);
                } catch (ParseException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
                ex.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }
}

Here's how the UI looks before adding GridBoxLabel to the MazeSolverInterface:

enter image description here

...and after adding GridBoxLabel to the MazeSolverInterface:

enter image description here

Any/all help is appreciated. Thank you!

EDIT: As you can see above, GridBoxPanel uses the GridCell class. I forgot to add that to this post, so here it is. Hope this helps!

GridCell:

public class GridCell extends JPanel {

    private Color defaultBackground;

    public GridCell() {
        addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
            @Override
            public void mouseEntered(MouseEvent e) {
                defaultBackground = getBackground();
                setBackground(Color.BLUE);
            }

            @Override
            public void mouseExited(MouseEvent e) {
                setBackground(defaultBackground);
            }
        });
    }

    @Override
    public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
        return new Dimension(50, 50);
    }
}
  • 2
    You must not use GroupLayout manually. GroupLayout are designed for GUI Builder tools. It will really be very difficult and error prone for anybody to manually use GroupLayout. You can use any GUI builder if you are wanting to use GroupLayout. – afzalex Aug 30 '14 at 23:07
  • Do you mean that if I were to remove any/all GroupLayout dependencies from the above code and re-run, my resizing issues would vanish? – Nishant Kelkar Aug 30 '14 at 23:22
  • Definitely it will work then. It is your panel with group layout which is creating problem, which is because you have tried to manually implement GroupLayout. And if you still wants to do it with GroupLayout manually, then turn off all autoCreate...Gaps() and instead manually add containerGap(..) as needed. Only this way you can make your GroupLayout panel to be resizable – afzalex Aug 30 '14 at 23:31
  • maybe to solve for your layout problem, using BorderLayout is the easiest way. One panel "Center", the other panel "Right".(if i understand your layout correct) – Ben Aug 31 '14 at 18:03
  • Thanks for all comments! I'm not going to answer this question, since I haven't found it myself, but there was a bug found: In GridCell, I'm setting preferred size to 50x50. For a grid of 32x32, that's 1600 along one dimension. But in MazeSolverInterface, a single side is only 700! That's why the maze is so tiny and in the center. I changed getPreferredSize to something like 15x15, and it looks much better now. The resizing issue seems to have vanished as well because of this. I also added a border to GridBoxPanel to gauge space wastage along the borders of the grid. – Nishant Kelkar Aug 31 '14 at 19:32
2

GroupLayout was indeed created for GUI tools, however, it can be used without problems manually. From the built-in managers it is the one that I would recommend to use.

I have modified your example a bit:

MazeSolverInterface.java

import java.awt.Container;
import java.text.ParseException;
import javax.swing.GroupLayout;
import static javax.swing.GroupLayout.Alignment.BASELINE;
import static javax.swing.GroupLayout.Alignment.TRAILING;
import javax.swing.JFormattedTextField;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import static javax.swing.JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.text.MaskFormatter;

public class MazeSolverInterface extends JFrame {

    public MazeSolverInterface(String[] args) throws ParseException {

        initMaze(args);
    }

    private void initMaze(String[] args) throws ParseException {

        Container pane = getContentPane();
        GroupLayout gl = new GroupLayout(pane);
        pane.setLayout(gl);

        gl.setAutoCreateContainerGaps(true);

        gl.setAutoCreateGaps(true);

        JLabel numRowsLabel = new JLabel("Rows:");
        JLabel numColsLabel = new JLabel("Columns:");

        MaskFormatter textMask = new MaskFormatter("##");
        //textMask.setPlaceholder("16");
        JFormattedTextField rowsText = new JFormattedTextField(textMask);
        JFormattedTextField colsText = new JFormattedTextField(textMask);

        rowsText.setColumns(20);
        colsText.setColumns(20);

        GridBoxPanel gridDrawComponent = new GridBoxPanel();

        gl.setHorizontalGroup(gl.createParallelGroup()
                .addGroup(gl.createSequentialGroup()
                        .addGroup(gl.createParallelGroup(TRAILING)
                                .addComponent(numRowsLabel)
                                .addComponent(numColsLabel))
                        .addGroup(gl.createParallelGroup()
                                .addComponent(rowsText)
                                .addComponent(colsText)))
                .addComponent(gridDrawComponent));

        gl.setVerticalGroup(gl.createSequentialGroup()
                .addGroup(gl.createParallelGroup(BASELINE)
                        .addComponent(numRowsLabel)
                        .addComponent(rowsText))
                .addGroup(gl.createParallelGroup(BASELINE)
                        .addComponent(numColsLabel)
                        .addComponent(colsText))
                .addComponent(gridDrawComponent));

        pack();

        setTitle("v0.0.1");
        setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    }
}

I have got rid of the GridSizePanel and moved the code into MazeSolverInterface. From the desing point of view, there is no need for a titled panel if there are no other specific panels. Labels are right-aligned. Text fields and the maze object grow or shrink when the window is resized.

The setSize() method was removed since it is preferrable to use the pack() method. You either use one or the other, but not both.

GridBoxPanel.java

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.GridLayout;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.border.Border;
import javax.swing.border.MatteBorder;

public class GridBoxPanel extends JPanel {

    public GridBoxPanel() {
        setLayout(new GridLayout(32, 32, 1, 1));

        for (int row = 0; row < 32; row++) {
            for (int col = 0; col < 32; col++) {

                GridCell gridCell = new GridCell();
                Border border = null;
                if (row < 4) {
                    if (col < 4) {
                        border = new MatteBorder(1, 1, 0, 0, Color.GRAY);
                    } else {
                        border = new MatteBorder(1, 1, 0, 1, Color.GRAY);
                    }
                } else {
                    if (col < 4) {
                        border = new MatteBorder(1, 1, 1, 0, Color.GRAY);
                    } else {
                        border = new MatteBorder(1, 1, 1, 1, Color.GRAY);
                    }
                }
                gridCell.setBorder(border);
                add(gridCell);
            }
        }
    }
}

Here I have used the GridLayout manager instead of the GridBagLayout. (It is maybe only the third example that I found where GridLayout can be useful.) I made this modification to make things easier, but I would personally not use GridLayout ever and create a solution completely with GroupLayout or MigLayout managers. (GridLayout is not portable because it sets margins in pixels. This is not optimal since our chosen fixed-space is not correct on all varieties of screen resolutons. What is OK on a smaller screen, is not OK on a larger one. Generally, we should avoid setting dimensions in pixels. This applies to your overridden getPreferredSize() method too.)

Maze

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