96

I have a string which is "Optional("5")". I need to remove the "" surrounding the 5. I have removed the 'Optional' by doing:

text2 = text2.stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString("Optional(", withString: "", options: NSStringCompareOptions.LiteralSearch, range: nil)

I am having difficulties removing the " characters as they designate the end of a string in the code.

1
  • 24
    If the string actually consists of the characters Optional("5") then probably something went wrong earlier, because that is the description of an optional string. It would make more sense to unwrap the optional before assigning to text2, instead of removing the "Optional(..)" textually.
    – Martin R
    Aug 31, 2014 at 11:05

13 Answers 13

180

Swift uses backslash to escape double quotes. Here is the list of escaped special characters in Swift:

  • \0 (null character)
  • \\ (backslash)
  • \t (horizontal tab)
  • \n (line feed)
  • \r (carriage return)
  • \" (double quote)
  • \' (single quote)

This should work:

text2 = text2.replacingOccurrences(of: "\\", with: "", options: NSString.CompareOptions.literal, range: nil)
4
  • 1
    Unfortunately with Swift 1.2, this doesn't seem to work on 32 bit devices.
    – PassKit
    Apr 27, 2015 at 11:58
  • 1
    @GerardGrundy Thank you very much for the comment! I updated the answer to make it compatible with the modern version of Swift. Feb 6, 2018 at 12:38
  • @Sergey Kalinichenko Hi, how can I remove multiple character sets for one string? For example I want to delete ".mp3" or ".m4a" depending on what the string contains. How can I do it? Dec 3, 2020 at 11:34
  • @VyacheslavBakinkskiy stackoverflow.com/a/71977992/5967144 Apr 23 at 8:19
68

Swift 3 and Swift 4:

text2 = text2.textureName.replacingOccurrences(of: "\"", with: "", options: NSString.CompareOptions.literal, range:nil)

Latest documents updated to Swift 3.0.1 have:

  • Null Character (\0)
  • Backslash (\\)
  • Horizontal Tab (\t)
  • Line Feed (\n)
  • Carriage Return (\r)
  • Double Quote (\")
  • Single Quote (\')
  • Unicode scalar (\u{n}), where n is between one and eight hexadecimal digits

If you need more details you can take a look to the official docs here

37

Here is the swift 3 updated answer

var editedText = myLabel.text?.replacingOccurrences(of: "\"", with: "")
Null Character (\0)
Backslash (\\)
Horizontal Tab (\t)
Line Feed (\n)
Carriage Return (\r)
Double Quote (\")
Single Quote (\')
Unicode scalar (\u{n})
1
  • This is a much cleaner way of doing it. Apr 13, 2018 at 22:50
9

To remove the optional you only should do this

println("\(text2!)")

cause if you dont use "!" it takes the optional value of text2

And to remove "" from 5 you have to convert it to NSInteger or NSNumber easy peasy. It has "" cause its an string.

1
  • 1
    should check it's not nil first, otherwise this will raise an exception.
    – CW0007007
    Aug 30, 2017 at 7:58
8

Replacing for Removing is not quite logical. String.filter allows to iterate a string char by char and keep only true assertion.

Swift 4 & 5

var aString = "Optional(\"5\")"

aString = aString.filter { $0 != "\"" }

> Optional(5)

Or to extend

var aString = "Optional(\"5\")"

let filteredChars = "\"\n\t"

aString = aString.filter { filteredChars.range(of: String($0)) == nil }

> Optional(5)
1
  • Sorry Luc, your second example gives an error message. Argument type 'String.Element' (aka 'Character') does not conform to expected type 'StringProtocol'.. I guess you missed something? Dec 31, 2019 at 17:12
7

I've eventually got this to work in the playground, having multiple characters I'm trying to remove from a string:

var otherstring = "lat\" : 40.7127837,\n"
var new = otherstring.stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet(NSCharacterSet.init(charactersInString: "la t, \n \" ':"))
count(new) //result = 10
println(new) 
//yielding what I'm after just the numeric portion 40.7127837
1
  • 1
    Could you please clarify: what is question being asked here?
    – milez
    Jul 23, 2015 at 5:38
5

If you want to remove more characters for example "a", "A", "b", "B", "c", "C" from string you can do it this way:

someString = someString.replacingOccurrences(of: "[abc]", with: "", options: [.regularExpression, .caseInsensitive])
4

As Martin R says, your string "Optional("5")" looks like you did something wrong.

dasblinkenlight answers you so it is fine, but for future readers, I will try to add alternative code as:

if let realString = yourOriginalString {
    text2 = realString
} else {
    text2 = ""
}

text2 in your example looks like String and it is maybe already set to "" but it looks like you have an yourOriginalString of type Optional(String) somewhere that it wasn't cast or use correctly.

I hope this can help some reader.

1
  • 1
    That could be simplified a bit more with the nil-coalescing operator, e.g. let resultingString = optionalString ?? "".
    – Kilian
    Jul 1, 2016 at 20:46
2

Let's say you have a string:

var string = "potatoes + carrots"

And you want to replace the word "potatoes" in that string with "tomatoes"

string = string.replacingOccurrences(of: "potatoes", with: "tomatoes", options: NSString.CompareOptions.literal, range: nil)

If you print your string, it will now be: "tomatoes + carrots"

If you want to remove the word potatoes from the sting altogether, you can use:

string = string.replacingOccurrences(of: "potatoes", with: "", options: NSString.CompareOptions.literal, range: nil)

If you want to use some other characters in your sting, use:

  • Null Character (\0)
  • Backslash (\)
  • Horizontal Tab (\t)
  • Line Feed (\n)
  • Carriage Return (\r)
  • Double Quote (\")
  • Single Quote (\')

Example:

string = string.replacingOccurrences(of: "potatoes", with: "dog\'s toys", options: NSString.CompareOptions.literal, range: nil)

Output: "dog's toys + carrots"

1
  • This is the simplest and most effective way to do this. Instead changes the variable itself instead of making a new one. I tried hard to explain this in the best way possible so please remember to upvote this answer. Aug 30, 2018 at 8:12
1

If you are getting the output Optional(5) when trying to print the value of 5 in an optional Int or String, you should unwrap the value first:

if value != nil
{ print(value)
}

or you can use this:

if let value = text {
    print(value)
}

or in simple just 1 line answer:

print(value ?? "")

The last line will check if variable 'value' has any value assigned to it, if not it will print empty string

1

Swift 5 (working)

For removing single / multiple characters. Only 1 line code.

trimmingCharacters(in: CharacterSet)

In action:

var yourString:String = "(\"This Is: Your String\")"
yourString = yourString.trimmingCharacters(in: ["("," ",":","\"",")"])
print(yourString)

Output:

ThisIsYourString

You are entering a Set that contains characters you're required to trim.

0

You've instantiated text2 as an Optional (e.g. var text2: String?). This is why you receive Optional("5") in your string. take away the ? and replace with:

var text2: String = ""
0

If you are getting the output Optional(5) when trying to print the value of 5 in an optional Int or String, you should unwrap the value first:

if let value = text {
    print(value)
}

Now you've got the value without the "Optional" string that Swift adds when the value is not unwrapped before.

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