I ran into some performance discrepancy between, almost identical, implementations of Scala and Java versions. I am seeing Java version that is 68% faster than Scala version. Any idea as to why this happens?

Java version:

public class Util {
public static Set < String > toBigramsJava(String s1) {
    Set <String> nx = new HashSet <String> ();
    for (int i = 0; i < s1.length() - 1; i++) {
        char x1 = s1.charAt(i);
        char x2 = s1.charAt(i + 1);
        String tmp = "" + x1 + x2;
        nx.add(tmp);
    }
    return nx;
}

}

Scala version:

object Util {
def toBigramsScala(str: String): scala.collection.mutable.Set[String] = {
    val hash: scala.collection.mutable.Set[String] = scala.collection.mutable.HashSet[String]()
    for (i <-0 to str.length - 2) {
        val x1 = str.charAt(i)
        val x2 = str.charAt(i + 1)
        val tmp = "" + x1 + x2
        hash.add(tmp)
    }
    return hash
}

}

Test Results:

scala> Util.time(for(i<-1 to 1000000) {Util.toBigramsScala("test test abc de")}) 17:00:05.034 [info] Something took: 1985ms

Util.time(for(i<-1 to 1000000) {Util.toBigramsJava("test test abc de")}) 17:01:51.597 [info] Something took: 623ms

System:

I ran this on Ubuntu 14.04, with 4 cores and 8Gig RAM. Java version 1.7.0_45, Scala version 2.10.2.

There is some more info on my blog.

  • 2
    This isn't a question though... You could revise it into a matching set of question and answer. – Anubian Noob Aug 31 '14 at 21:31
  • 1
    I suggest you have a look at the byte code to see the difference. – Peter Lawrey Aug 31 '14 at 21:34
  • 1
    Could it be an optimization of Java for loops that doesn't exist in Scala, since they have some particularities in Scala ? Those two methods seem really identical. Also, what happens if you replace the scala.collection.mutable.HashSet with a java.util.HashSet ? – Dici Aug 31 '14 at 21:40
  • 1
    You might be interested by this post I just found. It seems that the for loop is indeed the problem : ochafik.com/blog/?p=806 – Dici Aug 31 '14 at 21:55
  • 2
    For what it's worth, I just did a quick micro-benchmark of the add methods of util.HashSet and mutable.HashSet. Adding either one string or 100 different strings, I had about the same performance for both. So at east I don't think it's the fault of Scala's mutable HashSet. FYI, I based my benchmark on this example, which uses Caliper to avoid the usual pitfalls of micro-benchmarks on the JVM. – Cyäegha Aug 31 '14 at 22:52
up vote 10 down vote accepted

I've got roughly the same results with this scala version

object Util {
  def toBigramsScala(str: String) = {
    val hash = scala.collection.mutable.Set.empty[String]
    var i: Int = 0
    while (i <  str.length - 1) {
      val x1 = str.charAt(i)
      val x2 = str.charAt(i + 1)
      val tmp = new StringBuilder().append(x1).append(x2).toString()
      hash.add(tmp)
      i += 1
    }
    hash
  }
}

As I remember for loop in scala implemented as call to apply() method on Function0 which is megamorphic method call (expensive from JVM/JIT point of view). Plus possibly some string concatenation optimization made by javac.

I didn't check my assumptions with looking to generated byte code, but replacing for with while and string concatenation with StringBuilder made difference negligible.

Time for Java Version: 451 millis
Time for Scala Version: 589 millis

For-comprehensions are always slower then using a while loop or tail recursion as explained here.

The other problem in your example is the concatenation of the Strings. Scala will use the scala.collection.mutable.StringBuilder which has some performance issues (e.g. it will box your chars to Char instances) as mentioned in the other answers.

Changing the for-comprehension to a tail-recursive method and using java.lang.StringBuilder you will get mostly the same results in both Scala and Java (on my machine Scala is actually a few milliseconds faster).

I've conducted a similar test.

Here are the classes:

Java

public class JavaApp {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String s1 = args[0];
        java.util.Set <String> nx = new java.util.HashSet<>();
        for (int i = 0; i < s1.length() - 1; i++) {
            char x1 = s1.charAt(i);
            char x2 = s1.charAt(i + 1);
            String tmp = "" + x1 + x2;
            nx.add(tmp);
        }
        System.out.println(nx.toString());
    }
}

Scala

object ScalaApp {
    def main(args:Array[String]): Unit = {
        var s1 = args(0)
        val hash: scala.collection.mutable.Set[String] = scala.collection.mutable.HashSet[String]()
        for (i <-0 to s1.length - 2) {
            val x1 = s1.charAt(i)
            val x2 = s1.charAt(i + 1)
            val tmp = "" + x1 + x2
            hash.add(tmp)
        }
        println(hash.toString())
    }
}

Compilers and runtime version

Javac javac 1.8.0_20-ea

Java java version "1.8.0_20-ea"

Scalac Scala compiler version 2.11.0 -- Copyright 2002-2013, LAMP/EPFL

Scala Scala code runner version 2.11.0 -- Copyright 2002-2013, LAMP/EPFL

Scala is also slower. Taking a look at Scala version, it creates two anonymous classes.

One thing that might be taking some time as well is an auto boxing on the char variable in the for loop.

  44: iload_2
  45: invokestatic  #61                 // Method scala/runtime/BoxesRunTime.boxToCharacter:(C)Ljava/lang/Character;
  48: invokevirtual #55                 // Method scala/collection/mutable/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Lscala/collection/mutable/StringBuilder;
  51: iload_3
  52: invokestatic  #61                 // Method scala/runtime/BoxesRunTime.boxToCharacter:(C)Ljava/lang/Character;
  55: invokevirtual #55                 // Method scala/collection/mutable/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Lscala/collection/mutable/StringBuilder;

But that doesn't explain it all.

There a few ways to further speed up the Scala code.

  1. Instead of using a StringBuilder, we instead use a 2 character char array
  2. Instead of creating temporary vals x1 and x2, we just write directly to the char array
  3. We then use String's char[] constructor to create the string to place inside the HashSet
  4. We extract the loop termination into a variable max, just in case the JIT would miss optimizing that.

       object Util {
         def toBigramsScala(str: String) = {
           val hash = scala.collection.mutable.HashSet.empty[String]
           val charArray = new Array[Char](2)
           var i = 0
           val max = str.length - 1
           while (i < max) {
             charArray(0) = str.charAt(i)
             charArray(1) = str.charAt(i + 1)
             hash.add(new String(charArray))
             i += 1
           }
           hash
         }
       }
    

With those changes, I was able to get the same run time between the Java and Scala code. Surprisingly (at least in this example), the java.util.HashSet didn't give any performance gain over mutable.HashSet. In fairness, we can also apply all these optimizations to the Java code as well,

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.