2

I am currently making a little game in Xamarin.ios and the idea is that you have 30 seconds from the time you press start until its over (and takes you to the game over screen) but if you do the wrong move then its also game over. I am using System.Timers and the timer starts fine and begins ticking but when you get to 30 seconds and it stops, it prints to the console that the timer has finished but then doesn't do anything I want it to. I have tried everything I can think of but can't seem to figure it out. Any help is appreciated, thank you! Also sorry in advance, this is my first time using stackoverflow.

Here is the main code:

    //Setting up the timer
    int count = 1;
    System.Timers.Timer timer1;

    private void OnTimeEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        count++;
        Console.WriteLine ("timer tick");
        if (count == 30)
        {
            timer1.Enabled = false;
            Console.WriteLine ("timer finished");

            //**Everything from here on is just what I want to happen**
            imgBackground.Image = UIImage.FromFile ("gameover.jpg");
            btn1.SetBackgroundImage (null, UIControlState.Normal);
            btn2.SetBackgroundImage (null, UIControlState.Normal);
            btn3.SetBackgroundImage (null, UIControlState.Normal);
            btn4.SetBackgroundImage (null, UIControlState.Normal);
            lblTime.Text = "";
            btnStart.Enabled = true;
            hasend = true;
            //score is set back to 0
            score = 0;
            btn1green = false;
            btn2green = false;
            btn3green = false;
            btn4green = false;
        }
    }

Here is what I have on the start button (which works fine)

    //Start the timer
    timer1.Enabled = true;
    Console.WriteLine("timer started");

And here is what I have when you make a wrong move (also works fine)

        else
        {
            //adjust the UI
            imgBackground.Image = UIImage.FromFile("gameover.jpg");
            btn1.SetBackgroundImage(null, UIControlState.Normal);
            btn2.SetBackgroundImage(null, UIControlState.Normal);
            btn3.SetBackgroundImage(null, UIControlState.Normal);
            btn4.SetBackgroundImage(null, UIControlState.Normal);
            lblTime.Text = "";
            btnStart.Enabled = true;
            hasend = true;
            //score is set back to 0
            score = 0;
            btn1green = false;
            btn2green = false;
            btn3green = false;
            btn4green = false;
            timer1.Enabled = false;
            Console.WriteLine("timer stopped");
        }

So as you can see that is a decent amount to change in the UI once the timer finishes. I think that might have something to do with why it's not working

EDIT: This is also where I set up the timer under ViewDidLoad ()

timer1 = new System.Timers.Timer();
timer1.Interval = 1000;
timer1.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OnTimeEvent);
  • You're probably executing the Timer in a background thread (otherwise you're UI-thread would stall) but I don't see any code making sure the Timer executes OnTimeEvent on the UI-thread (which is needed because you're doing UI stuff). Could you post the code where you're setting up the timer? – Frank Sep 2 '14 at 8:33
  • Oh sorry, I will add the code to then end of the post. That is all I really have in terms of setting up the timer (Sorry i'm still learning haha) – Luke Martin Sep 2 '14 at 8:37
3

The problem is Timer is executed on a background thread. And background-threads can't modify UI objects.

timer1.Elapsed is set from the UI-thread in ViewDidLoad(). But it will be called from a background thread.

The solution is to wrap the code that affects UI objects in a InvokeOnMainThread (iOS) or RunOnUIThread (Android).

For an example for InvokeOnMainThread: http://developer.xamarin.com/guides/ios/user_interface/controls/part_2_-_working_with_the_ui_thread/

  • 1
    Thank you very much! This is just what I was looking for, I simply needed to wrap all that UI updating stuff in InvokeOnMainThread( () => { //stuff here }); Worked great! :) – Luke Martin Sep 2 '14 at 9:28
3

You can only access UI components on the UI thread. OnTimeEvent is being called from the timer's background thread not the UI thread. Another solution rather than using System.Timer and InvokeOnMainThread is to use TPL, which Xamarin supports. This will also work on android and winphone too (I think InvokeOnMainThread is ios specific?)

TaskScheduler uiContext = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();
Console.WriteLine("timer started");
Task.Delay(30000).ContinueWith((task) =>
    {
        //Do UI stuff
        label.Text = "!!";
        Console.WriteLine("timer stopped");
    }, uiContext);

Task.Delay(30000) starts and returns a background task that takes 30 seconds to complete. The ContinuesWith() call provides a method to run after that task completes, a continuation task. To make sure that continuation task runs on the UI thread a TaskScheduler is passed in. This TaskScheduler was taken from the UI thread.

Even simpler than this because you are using C# you can use the built in language support to write all that shorter:

async Task Run()
{
    Console.WriteLine("timer started");
    await Task.Delay(30000);
    //Do UI stuff
    label.Text = "!!";
    Console.WriteLine("timer stopped");
}

Then just call Run();

The await keyword effectively automatically sets up a continuation task for the rest of the method and returns immediately. The rest of the method is run after the Task.Delay(30000), but the switch back to the UI context is automatically handled as await captures it.

  • Thank you for you answer this is very helpful! I found task.delay would only work once and then create a few problems after that when using a CancellationTokenSource. But I think I might have another use for it :) Thanks again! – Luke Martin Sep 2 '14 at 9:30
  • 1
    InvokeOnMainThread is indeed iOS specific. Your solution is cross-platform (and arguably a better design). For simplicity InvokeOnMainThread or RunOnUIThread might be better as a first step if the developer is unaware of threading in iOS and Android platforms. Also though I've encountered some peculiarities in how Android threading handles TPL. In case I had to switch over to ThreadPool in combination with RunOnUIThread to get stuff working correctly while still performing. Either way, good example! – Frank Sep 2 '14 at 9:35
  • "Also though I've encountered some peculiarities in how Android threading handles TPL" oh great something to look forward to – Weyland Yutani Sep 2 '14 at 9:55
0

Considering that you setup your timer in ViewDidLoad() (so you don't have any sharing code benefit in using the .Net timer) you can also use the native Timer writing just one line:

NSTimer timer = NSTimer.CreateScheduledTimer(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(30), delegate { DoYourStuffEveryTimeSpan(); });

In your case since background-threads can't modify UI objects just wrap your UI Changes with BeginInvokeOnMainThread like this:

 DoYourStuffEveryTimeSpan()
 {
   BeginInvokeOnMainThread(() =>
      {
        DoMagicUIChanges();
      });
  }
0
        var timer = new Timer(2000);
        timer.Elapsed += OnTimerElapsed;
        timer.Start ();
        Console.WriteLine ("Timer started, control is back here");


void OnTimerElapsed(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine ("Time Elapsed");
        }

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