21

Is it possible to show only differences between old and new lines using git diff?

Here is content of file a.txt:

123456789

And here is content of file b.txt

123455789

Here is normal git diff output:

normal output

And here is what I'm trying to accomplish: wanted output

I'd prefer to do this using git diff, but if it can't be done I'm ok with any other app.

3
  • wondering why is better insert an screenshot, instead of a simple copy&paste ;)
    – clt60
    Sep 2, 2014 at 10:02
  • 1
    @jm666: Because the point is in the colors
    – xx77aBs
    Sep 2, 2014 at 11:51
  • 1
    Hm... seems, I have a bad day today. ;)
    – clt60
    Sep 2, 2014 at 12:02

1 Answer 1

23

This is what the --word-diff option to git diff does. Though not to that level of granularity by default.

To get single character diffs like that would require a custom --word-diff-regex as well. (I have '([^[:alnum:]]|[^[:space:]])' in a git alias here which seems to do that though. Though that wasn't the point when I wrote it.)

You can abbreviate --word-diff=color --word-diff-regex='...' to --color-words='...' too by the way.

See if this does what you want:

$ cat worddiff.awk
BEGIN {
    RS="\n?~\n"
    FS="\n"
}

# Special case the diff header/chunk header lines.
/^diff --git/ {
    print
    next
}

{
    delete outs
    for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) {
        if ($i ~ /^[-+]/) {
            mode = substr($i, 1, 1)
            $i = ((mode=="-")?red:green) substr($i, 2) reset
            outs[mode] = outs[mode] $i reset
            outs["set" mode]++
        } else {
            gsub(/^ /, "", $i)
            outs["-"] = outs["-"] $i
            outs["+"] = outs["+"] $i
        }
    }

    # If we didn't have any changes then this is a context line and we need to
    # print it out.
    if (!outs["set-"] && !outs["set+"]) {
        print " " outs["-"]
        next
    }

    if (outs["set-"]) {
        print red "-" reset outs["-"]
    }

    if (outs["set+"]) {
        print green "+" reset outs["+"]
    }
}

Used as:

git diff --word-diff=porcelain | awk -v red="$(tput setaf 1)" -v green="$(tput setaf 2)" -v reset="$(tput sgr0)" -f worddiff.awk

or

git diff --word-diff-regex='([^[:alnum:]]|[^[:space:]])' --word-diff=porcelain | awk -v red="$(tput setaf 1)" -v green="$(tput setaf 2)" -v reset="$(tput sgr0)" -f worddiff.awk

That awk could probably be cleaner and there's a non-GNU awk split idiom to clear an array that I can't recall offhand if delete a is a problem.

Edit: Updated code above to match newest revision of gist. The original special case pattern was overly permissive. The original code did not handle added blank lines correctly. The updated code doesn't either but does the best that I believe is possible given the known limitations of --word-diff=porcelain.

9
  • I knew about --word-diff option, but that's not what I'm looking for. I want before and after to be on two separate lines, not in the same line.
    – xx77aBs
    Sep 2, 2014 at 11:53
  • You won't be able to actually use that format of diff file anywhere but you should be able to create it with some post-processing of the default word-diff output. Sep 2, 2014 at 13:07
  • @xx77aBs Does --word-diff=porcelain do something close enough to what you want? If not you should definitely be able to post-process that into something like what you want. Sep 2, 2014 at 13:16
  • @xx77aBs Check my last edit. I think that'll do what you want. Sep 2, 2014 at 17:40
  • Hey man, thanks! Seems that's it. I have one small problem - everything is white. Do you have any idea why?
    – xx77aBs
    Sep 10, 2014 at 12:53

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