3

I have an unsigned int that holds a series of bits, and a certain bit location.

Now I want to set all bits to 1 from that bit location 'downwards'. How can this be achieved simply without a loop?

Example:

unsigned int bitloc=2;
unsigned int bits=??;           //must become 0000 0111

unsigned int bitloc=4;
unsigned int bits=??;           //must become 0001 1111

Equivalent function that creates the result:

bits=0;
for (unsigned int i=0; i<=bitloc; i++)
    bits|=1<<i;
2

How about?

unsigned int  Mask =   0xffffffff;
  bits = Mask >> (31 - bitloc);

as in your example bitloc is 2: Mask is a binary number of ones then we shift right it 29 time effectively adding 29 zeros from the left leaving only bit zero bit one and bit two as ones.

0xffffffff >> 29 = 0x00000007=000...0111

  • 1
    That's a different approach than the other answers, and it actually works for all bitloc including bitloc==31. And the same works when you want to use bitloc to let bits become 1110 0000 by simply using ~(Mask>>(32-bitloc)). Clever! – DoubleYou Sep 3 '14 at 6:45
  • For 64-bit, use ~0ULL instead of 0xFFFFFFFF (the ~0 also works for int too). – Jonathan Leffler Sep 3 '14 at 6:50
  • @JonathanLeffler, simply using -1 would work, wouldn't it: link? – DoubleYou Sep 3 '14 at 6:56
  • 1
    @DoubleYou: In practice, yes, appropriately qualified. In theory, no; if the machine uses 1's complement or sign-magnitude binary numbers, -1 won't work correctly (but ~0 will work even with those). – Jonathan Leffler Sep 3 '14 at 7:02
0

How about

bits |= (2 << bitloc) - 1;

Of course, this only works if bitloc <= 30.

  • I think it should be ..(2ul << bitloc).. – Don't You Worry Child Sep 3 '14 at 5:51
  • So for bitloc==31 create an if-statement containing bits=-1? – DoubleYou Sep 3 '14 at 5:54
  • @DoubleYou Yes, although bits = ~0 might be preferred from a pedantic point of view. – user3386109 Sep 3 '14 at 5:58
  • @user3386109 I've taken -1 from here as ~0 can behave differently on different systems. – DoubleYou Sep 3 '14 at 6:27
  • @DoubleYou interesting, in that case you shouldn't need an if statement at all, since the expression will evaluate to -1 on a 32-bit machine when bitloc is 31. – user3386109 Sep 3 '14 at 6:47
0

I hope this should work,

bits |= ~((~0)<<(bitloc + 1))
  • 2
    If bitloc == 31 and sizeof(unsigned int) == 4, you have undefined behaviour. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 3 '14 at 6:48
  • I accept @Jonathan Leffler – Adarsh Sep 3 '14 at 7:28
0

Here is the more generic solution for your question

Lets say you want to set "N" bits from a specific position "P" from M.S.B. towards LSB in a given value "X". Then the solution will be


X = X | ((~(~0 << N)) << ((P + 1) - N));

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