62

I have a table that looks like this:

id   count
1    100
2    50
3    10

I want to add a new column called cumulative_sum, so the table would look like this:

id   count  cumulative_sum
1    100    100
2    50     150
3    10     160

Is there a MySQL update statement that can do this easily? What's the best way to accomplish this?

79

If performance is an issue, you could use a MySQL variable:

set @csum := 0;
update YourTable
set cumulative_sum = (@csum := @csum + count)
order by id;

Alternatively, you could remove the cumulative_sum column and calculate it on each query:

set @csum := 0;
select id, count, (@csum := @csum + count) as cumulative_sum
from YourTable
order by id;

This calculates the running sum in a running way :)

  • 6
    Use a cross join to define the variable without needing to use SET. – OMG Ponies Apr 1 '10 at 22:12
  • My table has 36 million records, so this was really helpful to speed things up! – Kirk Ouimet Apr 2 '10 at 1:20
  • Note that ordering by cumulative_sum might force full table scan. – matt Sep 25 '12 at 9:23
  • 1
    This does work and seems quite fast; any suggestions how this can be extended to do a cumulative sum in a group? e.g. group by Name or similar, and then do a cumulative sum only for records with the same name – zaitsman Aug 31 '17 at 12:36
  • @zaitsman You can use it as a subquery; on the outer query, group by anything you want, and then use the MAX() MySQL function to get the correct cumulative summary (the last summary) that was calculated for the records inside the group. – Pascal Jul 12 '18 at 6:51
89

Using a correlated query:


  SELECT t.id,
         t.count,
         (SELECT SUM(x.count)
            FROM TABLE x
           WHERE x.id <= t.id) AS cumulative_sum
    FROM TABLE t
ORDER BY t.id

Using MySQL variables:


  SELECT t.id,
         t.count,
         @running_total := @running_total + t.count AS cumulative_sum
    FROM TABLE t
    JOIN (SELECT @running_total := 0) r
ORDER BY t.id

Note:

  • The JOIN (SELECT @running_total := 0) r is a cross join, and allows for variable declaration without requiring a separate SET command.
  • The table alias, r, is required by MySQL for any subquery/derived table/inline view

Caveats:

  • MySQL specific; not portable to other databases
  • The ORDER BY is important; it ensures the order matches the OP and can have larger implications for more complicated variable usage (IE: psuedo ROW_NUMBER/RANK functionality, which MySQL lacks)
  • +1: Nice solution... Added a comma after t.count. – Daniel Vassallo Apr 1 '10 at 22:00
  • I would add "ORDER BY t.id ASC" to the main query, just to make sure it'll always work – Wacek Apr 1 '10 at 22:20
  • My first thought also was to add ORDER BY. But it does not matter. Until addition turns into non-associative, at least :) – Dercsár Apr 2 '10 at 7:24
  • @OMG Poines: I think you need to use a SELECT in the JOIN (SELECT @running_total := 0) part of the variables example. – Daniel Vassallo Apr 28 '10 at 6:48
  • 1
    for "using a correlated query" where does your table x come from ? – allan.simon Sep 12 '16 at 15:40
5

MySQL 8.0/MariaDB supports windowed SUM(col) OVER():

SELECT *, SUM(cnt) OVER(ORDER BY id) AS cumulative_sum
FROM tab;

Output:

┌─────┬──────┬────────────────┐
│ id  │ cnt  │ cumulative_sum │
├─────┼──────┼────────────────┤
│  1  │ 100  │            100 │
│  2  │  50  │            150 │
│  3  │  10  │            160 │
└─────┴──────┴────────────────┘

db<>fiddle

3
UPDATE t
SET cumulative_sum = (
 SELECT SUM(x.count)
 FROM t x
 WHERE x.id <= t.id
)
  • 2
    Although the OP did ask for an update, this is denormalized and will probably be inconvenient to maintain correctly. – Matthew Flaschen Apr 1 '10 at 22:05
2

Sample query

SET @runtot:=0;
SELECT
   q1.d,
   q1.c,
   (@runtot := @runtot + q1.c) AS rt
FROM
   (SELECT
       DAYOFYEAR(date) AS d,
       COUNT(*) AS c
    FROM  orders
    WHERE  hasPaid > 0
    GROUP  BY d
    ORDER  BY d) AS q1
2
select Id, Count, @total := @total + Count as cumulative_sum
from YourTable, (Select @total := 0) as total ;
  • 4
    Please explain your answer – Rohit Gupta Oct 27 '15 at 0:26
  • The answer works and is one liner. It also initializes/resets the variable to zero at the begining of select. – raisercostin Feb 13 '17 at 14:41
1

You could also create a trigger that will calculate the sum before each insert

delimiter |

CREATE TRIGGER calCumluativeSum  BEFORE INSERT ON someTable
  FOR EACH ROW BEGIN

  SET cumulative_sum = (
     SELECT SUM(x.count)
        FROM someTable x
        WHERE x.id <= NEW.id
    )

    set  NEW.cumulative_sum = cumulative_sum;
  END;
|

I have not tested this

  • 3
    What happens if I update a value at a later date? – Kirk Broadhurst Mar 29 '12 at 4:32
0

select id,count,sum(count)over(order by count desc) as cumulative_sum from tableName;

I have used the sum aggregate function on the count column and then used the over clause. It sums up each one of the rows individually. The first row is just going to be 100. The second row is going to be 100+50. The third row is 100+50+10 and so forth. So basically every row is the sum of it and all the previous rows and the very last one is the sum of all the rows. So the way to look at this is each row is the sum of the amount where the ID is less than or equal to itself.

  • 2
    While this might solve the problem, it's better to explain it a bit so it will benefit others :) – Tiw Feb 22 at 2:40
  • Better edit into your answer :) – Tiw Feb 23 at 3:25
  • this isn't a co-related subquery or a subquery for that matter... co-related subquery follows SELECT ...., (SELECT .... FROM table2 WHERE table2.id = table1.id ) FROM table1 what you have is a window query.. – Raymond Nijland Feb 23 at 23:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.