75

I've written some code to render repeating elements in ReactJS, but I hate how ugly it is.

render: function(){
  var titles = this.props.titles.map(function(title) {
    return <th>{title}</th>;
  });
  var rows = this.props.rows.map(function(row) {
    var cells = [];
    for (var i in row) {
      cells.push(<td>{row[i]}</td>);
    }
    return <tr>{cells}</tr>;
  });
  return (
    <table className="MyClassName">
      <thead>
        <tr>{titles}</tr>
      </thead>
      <tbody>{rows}</tbody>
    </table>
  );
} 

Is there a better way to achieve this?

(I would like to embed for loops within the template code, or some similar approach.)

124

You can put expressions inside braces. Notice in the compiled JavaScript why a for loop would never be possible inside JSX syntax; JSX amounts to function calls and sugared function arguments. Only expressions are allowed.

(Also: Remember to add key attributes to components rendered inside loops.)

JSX + ES2015:

render() {
  return (
    <table className="MyClassName">
      <thead>
        <tr>
          {this.props.titles.map(title =>
            <th key={title}>{title}</th>
          )}
        </tr>
      </thead>
      <tbody>
        {this.props.rows.map((row, i) =>
          <tr key={i}>
            {row.map((col, j) =>
              <td key={j}>{col}</td>
            )}
          </tr>
        )}
      </tbody>
    </table>
  );
} 

JavaScript:

render: function() {
  return (
    React.DOM.table({className: "MyClassName"}, 
      React.DOM.thead(null, 
        React.DOM.tr(null, 
          this.props.titles.map(function(title) {
            return React.DOM.th({key: title}, title);
          })
        )
      ), 
      React.DOM.tbody(null, 
        this.props.rows.map(function(row, i) {
          return (
            React.DOM.tr({key: i}, 
              row.map(function(col, j) {
                return React.DOM.td({key: j}, col);
              })
            )
          );
        })
      )
    )
  );
} 
  • Nice catches. I added the missing parenthesis at the top and switched from for to a map. Since I don't know what the data is in each of the data structures, I assumed the rows are arrays and used the index of the iteration for the key. When data is added/removed from the array, that will cause unnecessary re-rendering. You should switch key to a value that uniquely identifies the data and that is not dependent on the order and/or size of the array. – Ross Allen Sep 3 '14 at 17:16
  • @ssorallen Thanks for your answer. I'll leave this question open for a couple of days, in case there is a nicer way of doing this, before accepting your answer. I think my issue is that JSX does not seem to have a non-expression escape, for for loops and similar, nor does it have template syntax for loops. – fadedbee Sep 4 '14 at 7:40
  • 1
    @chrisdew JSX is not a template language, it's syntactic sugar for plain old JavaScript. You won't get operators like you expect from template languages. Try pasting the code in this answer into the the live JSX compiler to understand what it's doing and why a for loop would never be possible. – Ross Allen Sep 4 '14 at 21:22
  • Could you add onClick event for each row and pass the row item to the function? I am trying something like this but I am getting Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'clickHandler' of undefined clickHandler() { console.log('on click row'); } <tbody> {this.props.rows.map(function(row, i) { return ( <tr key={i} onClick=this.clickHandler()> {row.map(function(col, j) { return <td key={j}>{col}</td>; })} </tr> ); })} </tbody> – Kiran Mar 9 '17 at 21:09
  • Never mind I have added .bind(this) to the map method then the method is getting involved for each row. Thank you. – Kiran Mar 9 '17 at 22:20
12

To expand on Ross Allen's answer, here is a slightly cleaner variant using ES6 arrow syntax.

{this.props.titles.map(title =>
  <th key={title}>{title}</th>
)}

It has the advantage that the JSX part is isolated (no return or ;), making it easier to put a loop around it.

10

Shallow (via Array from():

<table>
    { Array.from({length:3}, (value, index) => <tr key={value.id} />) }
</table>

Another way would be via Array fill():

<table>
    { Array(3).fill(<tr />) }
</table>

Nested Nodes:

 var table = (
      <table>
        { Array.from(Array(3)).map((tr, tr_i) => 
            <tr> 
              { Array.from(Array(4)).map((a, td_i, arr) => 
                  <td>{arr.length * tr_i + td_i + 1}</td>
               )}
            </tr>
        )}
      </table>
);

ReactDOM.render(table, document.querySelector('main'))
td{ border:1px solid silver; padding:1em; }
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>
<main></main>

  • 1
    I spent at least 2 hours to be able to loop inside the loop in render function. thanks. you saved my day. – Shwe May 17 at 21:15
  • 1
    Couldn't you do this instead of use map? Array.from({length: 5}, (value, index) => <tr />) – creativehandle Jun 5 at 2:01
  • @creativehandle - yes, thanks!, updated the answer – vsync Jun 5 at 17:36
2

In the spirit of functional programming, let's make our components a bit easier to work with by using abstractions.

// converts components into mappable functions
var mappable = function(component){
  return function(x, i){
    return component({key: i}, x);
  }
}

// maps on 2-dimensional arrays
var map2d = function(m1, m2, xss){
  return xss.map(function(xs, i, arr){
    return m1(xs.map(m2), i, arr);
  });
}

var td = mappable(React.DOM.td);
var tr = mappable(React.DOM.tr);
var th = mappable(React.DOM.th);

Now we can define our render like this:

render: function(){
  return (
    <table>
      <thead>{this.props.titles.map(th)}</thead>
      <tbody>{map2d(tr, td, this.props.rows)}</tbody>
    </table>
  );
}

jsbin


An alternative to our map2d would be a curried map function, but people tend to shy away from currying.

  • Those functions don't give the dev the opportunity to specify the key attribute. Using the index means that adding/removing elements will force re-rendering for objects that might not have changed. – Ross Allen Sep 3 '14 at 20:59
  • True, but 95% of the time the index based keys are sufficient. I'd rather go a little out of the way on the somewhat rare exceptions. – Brigand Sep 3 '14 at 22:24
  • Agreed, It would be easy enough to ensure that the keys are unique at any given level if it were necessary, I like it. – Ryan Ore May 2 '16 at 22:04
1

This is, imo, the most elegant way to do it (with ES6). Instantiate you empty array with 7 indexes and map in one line:

Array.apply(null, Array(7)).map((i)=>
<Somecomponent/>
)

kudos to https://php.quicoto.com/create-loop-inside-react-jsx/

  • Nice! Seems you can also do Array(...Array(10)).map((v, i) => <SomeComponent />) – magritte Jun 12 '18 at 13:40

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