4

I am having trouble with Javac on compiling this piece of code:

public static int getYear() {
    Console input = System.console();
    Boolean gotYear = false;
    int year;

    String userInput = input.readLine();

    while (!gotYear) {
        try {
            year = Integer.parseInt(userInput);
            gotYear = true;
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.print("Please insert a valid date. ");
            userInput = input.readLine();
        }
    }

    return year;
}

Javac gives me the error on line return year; that "variable 'year' might not have been initialized". But since it's inside a while loop, I know for sure it will have been initialized. I asked my T.A. about this and he was not able to answer me why this happens. His best guess is that Javac is not a very good compiler for figuring this kind of stuff out.

Basically, why is this error happening? I know I can fix it by initializing year before I enter the while loop, but I wanted to know if there is another way of achieving what I'm trying to achieve.

3
  • 1
    just initialize year to -1 Sep 3 '14 at 14:18
  • With the code that you have now, the 'year' variable is not initialized yet and might not initialize. What if your while loop will not execute? Just use an default value, like -1.
    – Marko
    Sep 3 '14 at 14:21
  • Don't use catch block for program flow.
    – Stefan
    Sep 3 '14 at 14:21
7

Your year variable is initialized in a try block. It's obvious to us that it won't get out the loop until something OK is input. But the compiler's rules are simpler than that : as the initialisation can be disrupted by an exception, it considers that year may be uninitialized.

2
  • 1
    I wished it didn't throw an error though.. If it was a warning, I would understand, but an error makes me feel so bad about my code :( Sep 3 '14 at 20:28
  • As @Zhuinden suggests in the comments, initialize year with a default value when you declare it and the compiler won't generate an error anymore.
    – Julien
    Sep 4 '14 at 7:26
2

No. You have to initialize. Local aka method variables must gets initialized before they use.

Local variable won't get default values. You have to initialize them, before you use.

1

Imagine a situation when gotYear in

while (!gotYear)

evaluates to true.

In this case year will not be initialized, as it is inside the while loop.

while (!gotYear) {
    try {
        year = Integer.parseInt(userInput);
        gotYear = true;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.print("Please insert a valid date. ");
        userInput = input.readLine();
    }
}

At the time of compilation java compiler doesn't evaluates expressions. Therefore gotYear can take either of two values true or false.

Local variables should be initialized within the same scope in which they are declared. Intialization should be done before using it.

0

You must initialize local variables. Go through This to understand basics

0

Local variables are used mostly for intermediate calculations whereas instance variables are supposed to carry data for calculations for future and intermediate as well. Java allows default value for instance variables but for local variables its required to assign the value. So to avoid mistakes you need to initialize local variables.

0

year will not be assigned to when Integer.parseInt(userInput); throws a NumberFormatException.

That gotYear then remains Boolean.FALSE keeping in the loop, is too complex for the compiler. It thinks you might exit the loop somehow.

The following should behave better.

for (;;) {
    try {
        year = Integer.parseInt(userInput);
        break;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.print("Please insert a valid date. ");
        userInput = input.readLine();
    }
}

Maybe the compiler just might accept:

for (boolean keepAsking = true; keepAsking; ) {
    try {
        year = Integer.parseInt(userInput);
        keepAsking = false;

BTW better use boolean instead of the Object wrapper class Boolean.

4
  • The famous and so ugly empty "for(;;)" and the "break" that reminds us of Basic.
    – Julien
    Sep 3 '14 at 14:32
  • May I ask why usage of boolean is preferred (rather than Boolean)? Sep 3 '14 at 14:40
  • boolean is the primitive type (like int) that contains true of false. Boolean is a child class of Object and holds a boolean value. It hence can be null too.
    – Joop Eggen
    Sep 3 '14 at 14:51
  • @Julien introducing a control variable does not make it more "structured" IMHO, a break is nicely tied to } whereas a flag either has a too large scope, or ... see my changed answer,
    – Joop Eggen
    Sep 3 '14 at 14:57

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