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Is it possible to add comments to the non-XML bcp/BULK INSERT format files?

This would be very helpful in scenarios where these files are treated as declarative code--because, well, code needs comments.

Haven't tried anything yet, because I'd just be throwing random chars with possible unforeseen after-effects.

A definitive "no" would be an acceptable answer.

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  • Marc, I can find no details on adding comments to text format files. That said, and knowing that you specified "non-XML", my experience has been that xml format files are far easier to understand and easy to generate, and you can easily add comments. The only case in which a text format file is preferred is if you wish to skip a column, and that case can be covered by bulk inserting into a view. – Katherine Elizabeth Lightsey Sep 3 '14 at 17:19
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I think the closest to a definitive negative answer is the fact that there is neither a single mention of comments in the documentation nor any examples. I guess there is a specification somewhere in the archives at Microsoft, but it doesn't seem to be available online.

The clearest definition of the non-xml format I've seen is this image (taken from Structure of Non-XML Format Files):

Structure of Non-XML Format Files

For me that is proof enough that comments are not a part of the format and the answer to your question is NO.

As pointed out in the comment by Katherine Elizabeth Lightsey using the newer XML-based format files might be a better, more flexible option, with the added bonus that the XML-format is pretty much self-describing.

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Not allowing comments in the format file is only the 47th most miserable thing about bcp.

I needed this too, and as my workflow was already using a wrapper script, a small bit of PowerShell easily filters the documented format file into a temporary one that bcp would accept:

...
Get-Content $commentedformatfile |
    Where-Object { -Not $_.StartsWith("#") } |
    Set-Content "_temp.fmt"
...
bcp ... -f _temp.fmt ...

This simple mechanism only supports comments via a # character at the start of a line, but it was entirely suitable for me.

Note that bcp barfs on even a blank line so you still have to pay attention.

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