enum Tree{
    case Leaf(String)
    case Node(Tree)
} //compiler not happy!!

enum Tree{
    case Leaf(String)
    case Node([Tree])
} //compiler is happy in (arguably) a more complex recursive scenario?

How can the Swift compiler work for the second (more complex) scenario and not the first?

  • Because there is an intermediate step, Array, that avoids being directly recursive. – jtbandes Sep 3 '14 at 21:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

A value type (an enum) cannot contain itself as a direct member, since not matter how big a data structure is, it cannot contain itself. Apparently associated data of enum cases are considered direct members of the enum, so the associated data cannot be the type of the enum itself. (Actually, I wish that they would make recursive enums work; it would be so great for functional data structures.)

However, if you have a level of indirection, it is okay. For example, the associated data can be an object (instance of a class), and that class can have a member that is the enum. Since class types are reference types, it is just a pointer and does not directly contain the object (and thus the enum), so it is fine.

The answer to your question is: [Tree] does not contain Tree directly as a member. The fields of Array are private, but we can generally infer that the storage for the elements of the array are not stored in the Array struct directly, because this struct has a fixed size for a given Array<T>, but the array can have unlimited number of elements.

It is worth noting that Swift 2 beta 2 and further has indirect keyword for recursive enum - that means

enum Tree<T> {
    case Leaf(T)
    indirect case Node(Tree)
}

is valid language construct that doesn't break pattern matching in Swift 2.

TL;DR of the decision: "[…] we decided that the right solution is to simply not support general, non-obvious recursion through enums, and require the programmer to mediate that explicitly with indirect."


  • Thanks for the update. It's good that it's there but it aint pretty! Also don't know why it needs to be there from a syntax pov - the parser/compiler could figure out your intention easily. – Sam Jun 11 '15 at 10:37
  • 1
    @Sam: Here's why. tl;dr: "[…] we decided that the right solution is to simply not support general, non-obvious recursion through enums, and require the programmer to mediate that explicitly with indirect." – Regexident Jul 23 '15 at 20:07
  • Adding the reasoning to the answer if @Regexident doesn't mind. – mpolednik Jul 27 '15 at 10:13
  • @mpolednik: Sure, go ahead. ;) – Regexident Jul 27 '15 at 12:23

Chris Lattner (designer of Swift) says on the Apple Developer forums that autoclosure

has emerged as a way to "box" expression value in a reference (e.g. working around limitations with recursive enums).

However, the following code (which works in Swift 1.1) does not work in Swift 1.2 that comes with Xcode Beta Version 6.3 (6D520o). The error message is "Attributes can only be applied to declarations, not types", however if this is intended, I don't know how to reconcile it with Lattner's statement about the behaviour he talks about in the previous quote as being "a useful thing, and we haven't removed it with Swift 1.2."

enum BinaryTree {
    case Leaf(String)
    case Node(@autoclosure () -> BinaryTree, @autoclosure () -> BinaryTree)
}

let l1 = BinaryTree.Leaf("A")
let l2 = BinaryTree.Leaf("B")
let l3 = BinaryTree.Leaf("C")
let l4 = BinaryTree.Leaf("D")
let n1 = BinaryTree.Node(l1, l2)
let n2 = BinaryTree.Node(l3, l4)
let t = BinaryTree.Node(n1, n2)

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.