16

I'm trying to identify at compile-time whether a function is ever called. Specifically, I want to throw a static assertion failure if it is:

template <typename T>
auto Function(T value) -> std::enable_if<someCondition, int>
{
  // this is the function I want to call
}

template <typename... T>
int Function(T...)
{
  // This function should never be called, instead I want
  // a compile-time failure if this is called, because it
  // means the above function wasn't successfully resolved.
}

The reason I want to do this is because failure to correctly call Function() with the correct conditions results in thousands of lines of compiler error messages, none of which are very helpful to anyone who is not intimately familiar with the code base.

The reason I don't want to place a static_assert in Function is because we have many of these functions, and we have the means instead to generate the Catch-all versions via macros, which would avoid unnecessary growth of the code-base while producing more helpful error messages.

Can this be done?

9
  • I don't understand from your question why you don't want a static_assert. You do attempt to explain it, but I don't understand your explanation. If the catch-all versions are generated from macros, why can a static_assert not be generated from a macro too? – user743382 Sep 3 '14 at 22:33
  • @Arman my comment has the intention to show that your title is a bogus. – 101010 Sep 3 '14 at 22:34
  • @hvd no, because the macro is in a different location, and the Function that I do want to call is not generated by a macro. The reason I want to do it like this is because the macro (which is somewhere else) can still generate the catch-all function. – quant Sep 3 '14 at 22:34
  • 1
    @hvd ah right, no my question is basically how do I put the static assert there to cause it to trigger only if the function is actually called from somewhere. If I just put a static_assert(false,...) in there it'll just fail regardless, right? – quant Sep 3 '14 at 22:38
  • 1
    @Arman Right, that would fail. So don't do that. :) I've posted what does work as an answer. – user743382 Sep 3 '14 at 22:43
21

Based on the comments on your question, you don't want a static_assert here:

template <typename T>
auto Function(T value) -> std::enable_if<someCondition, int>
{
  // this is the function I want to call
}

...but there's actually nothing wrong with a static_assert here:

template <typename... T>
struct dependent_false { static constexpr bool value = false; };

template <typename... T>
int Function(T...)
{
  static_assert(dependent_false<T...>::value, "you are passing the wrong arguments!");
}

As you correctly noted, a simple static_assert(false, "..."); would fail at template definition time. To get something that only fails at instantiation time, you need a dependent expression, and the dependent_false helper struct is an easy way to get something that will be type-dependent, will pretty much always be false, but cannot be assumed by the compiler to truly always be false: the compiler cannot rule out you adding partial specialisations to make dependent_false<...>::value true for some type.


Looking back at this old question, there may be a much simpler answer: mark the overload as deleted.

template <typename T>
auto Function(T value) -> std::enable_if<someCondition, int>
{
    // this is the function I want to call
}

template <typename... T>
int Function(T...) = delete;

This is not exactly the same thing, since this allows a caller to check the well-formedness of e.g. Function(int, int) instead of forcing an error, but it's more readable, and generally you would want that exact behaviour of not getting an error unless the function is actually used, not merely referenced.

10
  • 1
    Why not do static_assert(false, "...")? – 0x499602D2 Sep 3 '14 at 22:43
  • 3
    @0x499602D2 Because that can (and typically does) fail at template definition time, instead of at template instantiation time. – user743382 Sep 3 '14 at 22:45
  • Great answer, thanks :) It's a pity the STL doesn't provide dependent_false! – quant Sep 3 '14 at 22:53
  • You can also just do something like static_assert(sizeof(T) != sizeof(T), ... which saves a bit of code, but is a bit of a nasty hack. – Riot Aug 21 '15 at 22:37
  • @Riot That is not valid, technically. If there cannot be any valid instantiation of a template, the definition is invalid and compilers are allowed to reject it at definition time. You're making that hard, but not impossible. – user743382 Aug 21 '15 at 22:59
0

Just to extend a bit on the accepted answer:
We can additionally define the following

template <class... T>
inline constexpr bool dependant_false_v = dependant_false<T...>::value;

Usage is then:

template <typename... T>
int Function(T...)
{
  static_assert(dependent_false_v<T...>, "you are passing the wrong arguments!");
}

Which looks more clean IMO and is shorter to write.

Using C++17, we can even get rid of the SFINAE enable_if and merge everything in just one function via constexpr if:

template <typename T>
auto Function(T value)
{
  if constexpr(someCondition) {
    // Code for your function
  } else {
    static_assert(dependent_false_v<T>, "you are passing the wrong arguments!");
  }
}
1
  • My reason for posting this is as I got here following a Link in a blog about constexpr if which referred to the accepted answer in order to avoid the ill-formed static_assert(false), see here: blog.tartanllama.xyz/if-constexpr – clocktown Oct 6 '18 at 21:16

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