6

Have such line:

xxAyayyBwedCdweDmdwCkDwedBAwe
;;;; cleaner example
__A__B__C__D__C_D_BA_

want replace the ABCD into PQRT e.g. to get

__P__Q__R__T__R_T_QP_

e.g the quivalent of the next bash or perl tr

tr '[ABCD]' '[PQRT]' <<<"$string"

How to do this in "vim"? (VIM - Vi IMproved 7.4 (2013 Aug 10, compiled May 9 2014 12:12:40))

  • 6
    is this cheating? %!tr 'ABCD' 'PQRT' – Kent Sep 4 '14 at 12:22
  • @Kent heh... calling shell? it works, but have occasional problems with metacharacter escaping, especially when want tr the [] to () and such... – kobame Sep 4 '14 at 12:47
  • 1
    calling !tr is just for a short cmd. the tr() is better, particularly when (external)tr is not available. however, with !tr, () or [] won't be a problem. it is not regex. – Kent Sep 4 '14 at 12:50
9

You can use the tr() function combined with :global

:g/./call setline(line('.'), tr(getline('.'), 'ABCD', 'PQRS'))

It is easy to adapt it to a :%Tr#ABCD#PQRS command.

:command! -nargs=1 -range=1 Translate <line1>,<line2>call s:Translate(<f-args>)

function! s:Translate(repl_arg) range abort
  let sep = a:repl_arg[0]
  let fields = split(a:repl_arg, sep)
  " build the action to execute
  let cmd = a:firstline . ',' . a:lastline . 'g'.sep.'.'.sep
        \. 'call setline(".", tr(getline("."), '.string(fields[0]).','.string(fields[1]).'))'
  " echom cmd
  " and run it
  exe cmd
endfunction
  • Great! For me enough the 1st line. :) Thanx a lot. – kobame Sep 4 '14 at 12:44
  • 1
    Nice. You don't need the :g/./ BTW, as :call can take a range itself:. – Ingo Karkat Sep 4 '14 at 14:29
  • Oh. I didn't know about that. Thanks. – Luc Hermitte Sep 4 '14 at 14:37
  • 7
    Vimgolf: %s/.*/\=tr(submatch(0), 'ABCD', 'PQRS') – Peter Rincker Sep 4 '14 at 14:41
  • 2
    Golfier (assumes the cursor is in the first column): C<C-r>=tr(@", 'ABCD', 'PQRS')<CR><Esc> – Jordan Running Nov 3 '16 at 15:51

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