168

I am using Swift and I want to be able to load a UIViewController when I rotate to landscape, can anyone point me in the right direction?

I Can't find anything online and a little bit confused by the documentation.

4
  • 1
    I suppose that the API has not changed so it should be "didRotateToOrientation" and "willRotateToOrientation", something like that, take a look in the Apple documentation Sep 4, 2014 at 13:12
  • 1
    Hi @mArm.ch, thanks for the quick reply! So how would I implement this? (This is my first app... I'm very new to IOS) :)
    – David
    Sep 4, 2014 at 13:38
  • I reposted as answer, for other people. Can you accept it if it's ok for you ? Sep 4, 2014 at 13:41
  • Check this one if you want to check orientation when the app launched. stackoverflow.com/questions/34452650/…
    – eharo2
    Feb 3, 2021 at 18:05

24 Answers 24

218

Here's how I got it working:

In AppDelegate.swift inside the didFinishLaunchingWithOptions function I put:

NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(AppDelegate.rotated), name: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification, object: nil)

and then inside the AppDelegate class I put the following function:

func rotated() {
    if UIDeviceOrientationIsLandscape(UIDevice.current.orientation) {
        print("Landscape")
    }

    if UIDeviceOrientationIsPortrait(UIDevice.current.orientation) {
        print("Portrait")
    }
}

Hope this helps anyone else!

Thanks!

17
  • 5
    I tried adding the addObserver in the AppDelegate but kept getting a SIGABRT in CoreFoundation with an unrecognised selector. However, when I moved the addObserver to a viewDidLoad in my first view it worked perfectly. Just for information if anyone comes across the same issue. Nov 14, 2014 at 10:46
  • 1
    Im new to coding but shouldn't selector have a string format of "rotated:"??
    – Chameleon
    Apr 24, 2015 at 23:44
  • 4
    Im pretty sure thats only if you are accepting arguments (which rotated() doesn't)
    – David
    Apr 25, 2015 at 9:36
  • 34
    Be careful because UIDeviceOrientation is something different to UIInterfaceOrientation.. This is because UIDeviceOrientation also detects face down and face up orientations meaning that your code can jump between portrait and landscape randomly if your device is resting on an almost flat but slightly uneven surface (i.e rocking on the protruding camera of the 6/6s) Feb 16, 2016 at 10:29
  • 5
    This method DO NOT WORK if the phone disabled auto rotation.
    – chengsam
    Aug 5, 2016 at 8:23
187

According to the Apple docs:

This method is called when the view controller's view's size is changed by its parent (i.e. for the root view controller when its window rotates or is resized).

override func viewWillTransition(to size: CGSize, with coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator) {
    super.viewWillTransition(to: size, with: coordinator)
    
    if UIDevice.current.orientation.isLandscape {
        print("Landscape")
    }
    if UIDevice.current.orientation.isFlat {
        print("Flat")
    } else {
        print("Portrait")
    }
}
6
  • 74
    This will be called BEFORE the rotation. If you need e.g. the frame size after the rotation this solution will not work.
    – UpCat
    Mar 27, 2015 at 9:31
  • didn't work in extension. landscape or portrait still print "portraight"
    – TomSawyer
    May 23, 2015 at 7:45
  • 5
    This method DO NOT WORK if the phone disabled auto rotation.
    – chengsam
    Aug 5, 2016 at 8:24
  • 6
    on iPad, since size class is the same regular for both landscape and portrait, this method is never called.
    – LiangWang
    Dec 30, 2016 at 6:08
  • This will also fail if the device returns isFlat. developer.apple.com/documentation/uikit/uideviceorientation/…
    – CodeBender
    Sep 17, 2018 at 3:40
65

I need to detect rotation while using the camera with AVFoundation, and found that the didRotate (now deprecated) & willTransition methods were unreliable for my needs. Using the notification posted by David did work, but is not current for Swift 3.x & above.

The following makes use of a closure, which appears to be Apple's preference going forward.

var didRotate: (Notification) -> Void = { notification in
        switch UIDevice.current.orientation {
        case .landscapeLeft, .landscapeRight:
            print("landscape")
        case .portrait, .portraitUpsideDown:
            print("Portrait")
        default:
            print("other (such as face up & down)")
        }
    }

To set up the notification:

NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(forName: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification,
                                       object: nil,
                                       queue: .main,
                                       using: didRotate)

To tear down the notification:

NotificationCenter.default.removeObserver(self,
                                          name: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification,
                                          object: nil)

Regarding the deprecation statement, my initial comment was misleading, so I wanted to update that. As noted, the usage of @objc inference has been deprecated, which in turn was needed to use a #selector. By using a closure instead, this can be avoided and you now have a solution that should avoid a crash due to calling an invalid selector.

7
  • 4
    Do you have reference to where Apple talking about discouraging the use of #selector in Swift 4? I would like to read up on why they are saying this.
    – jeffjv
    Nov 7, 2017 at 6:21
  • @jeffjv Certainly, I do not have a direct link to an Apple document, but I did include a screenshot of the compiler warning that XCode provides if you use the previous approach.
    – CodeBender
    Nov 7, 2017 at 16:22
  • 1
    I have added a link to swift-evolution that discusses the change.
    – CodeBender
    Mar 28, 2018 at 17:50
  • 1
    @CodeBender: The compiler warning does not mean what you suggest. #selector is not being depreciated, only "@objc" inference. This means that when using a function as a #selector you have to explicitly mark it, so that the compiler will generate the additional correct code because the compiler will no longer try infer it from your usage. Hence, if you add "@obj" to your rotate() func in your Swift 3.0 solution, the code will compile without the warning.
    – Mythlandia
    Jul 22, 2018 at 6:20
  • Thanks @Mythlandia, I updated the answer to resolve the confusion over my initial statement.
    – CodeBender
    Sep 17, 2018 at 3:38
20

Using -orientation property of UIDevice is not correct (even if it could work in most of cases) and could lead to some bugs, for instance UIDeviceOrientation consider also the orientation of the device if it is face up or down, there is no direct pair in UIInterfaceOrientation enum for those values.
Furthermore, if you lock your app in some particular orientation, UIDevice will give you the device orientation without taking that into account.
On the other side iOS8 has deprecated the interfaceOrientation property on UIViewController class.
There are 2 options available to detect the interface orientation:

  • Use the status bar orientation
  • Use size classes, on iPhone if they are not overridden they could give you a way to understand the current interface orientation

What is still missing is a way to understand the direction of a change of interface orientation, that is very important during animations.
In the session of WWDC 2014 "View controller advancement in iOS8" the speaker provides a solution to that problem too, using the method that replaces -will/DidRotateToInterfaceOrientation.

Here the proposed solution partially implemented, more info here:

func viewWillTransitionToSize(size: CGSize, withTransitionCoordinator coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator) {
        let orientation = orientationFromTransform(coordinator.targetTransform())
        let oldOrientation = UIApplication.sharedApplication().statusBarOrientation
        myWillRotateToInterfaceOrientation(orientation,duration: duration)
        coordinator.animateAlongsideTransition({ (ctx) in
            self.myWillAnimateRotationToInterfaceOrientation(orientation,
            duration:duration)
            }) { (ctx) in
                self.myDidAnimateFromInterfaceOrientation(oldOrientation)
        }
    }
12

I know this question is for Swift, but since it's one of the top links for a Google search and if you're looking for the same code in Objective-C:

// add the observer
[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(rotated:) name:UIDeviceOrientationDidChangeNotification object:nil];

// remove the observer
[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:self name:UIDeviceOrientationDidChangeNotification object:nil];

// method signature
- (void)rotated:(NSNotification *)notification {
    // do stuff here
}
12

I like checking the orientation notification because you can add this feature in any class, no needs to be a view or a view controller. Even in your app delegate.

SWIFT 5:

    //ask the system to start notifying when interface change
    UIDevice.current.beginGeneratingDeviceOrientationNotifications()
    //add the observer
    NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(
        self,
        selector: #selector(orientationChanged(notification:)),
        name: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification,
        object: nil)

than caching the notification

    @objc func orientationChanged(notification : NSNotification) {
        //your code there
    }
11

Easy, this works in iOS8 and 9 / Swift 2 / Xcode7, just put this code inside your viewcontroller.swift. It will print the screen dimensions with every orientation change, you can put your own code instead:

override func didRotateFromInterfaceOrientation(fromInterfaceOrientation: UIInterfaceOrientation) {
        getScreenSize()
    }
    var screenWidth:CGFloat=0
    var screenHeight:CGFloat=0
    func getScreenSize(){
        screenWidth=UIScreen.mainScreen().bounds.width
        screenHeight=UIScreen.mainScreen().bounds.height
        print("SCREEN RESOLUTION: "+screenWidth.description+" x "+screenHeight.description)
    }
3
  • 5
    This function was deprecated, use "viewWillTransitionToSize:withTransitionCoordinator: " instead Feb 29, 2016 at 5:37
  • Beside being deprecated, didRotateFromInterfaceOrientation() doesn't work reliably. It misses some rotations. iewWillTransitionToSize:withTransitionCoordinator: works ok.
    – Andrej
    Jul 11, 2016 at 22:33
  • @Andrej Lots of things are now deprecated thanks to Swift 3
    – Josh
    Jul 12, 2016 at 9:46
10

Use the new viewWillTransitionToSize(_:withTransitionCoordinator:)

10

Since iOS 8 this is the correct way to do it.

override func viewWillTransition(to size: CGSize, with coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator) {
    super.viewWillTransition(to: size, with: coordinator)

    coordinator.animate(alongsideTransition: { context in
        // This is called during the animation
    }, completion: { context in
        // This is called after the rotation is finished. Equal to deprecated `didRotate`
    })
}
1
  • Much better answer than NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(AppDelegate.rotated), name: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification, object: nil). The issue with UIDeviceOrientation is that it detects face down and face up orientations which we don't need. May 7, 2021 at 18:23
8

In Objective C

-(void)viewWillTransitionToSize:(CGSize)size withTransitionCoordinator:(id<UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator>)coordinator

In swift

func viewWillTransitionToSize(size: CGSize, withTransitionCoordinator coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator)

Override this method to detect the orientation change.

8

Swift 3 | UIDeviceOrientationDidChange Notification Observed Too Often

The following code prints "deviceDidRotate" every time your device changes orientation in 3D space - regardless of a change from portrait to landscape orientation. For example, if you hold your phone in portrait orientation and tilt it forward and backward - deviceDidRotate() is called repeatedly.

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
    NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(
        self, 
        selector:  #selector(deviceDidRotate), 
        name: .UIDeviceOrientationDidChange, 
        object: nil
    )
}

func deviceDidRotate() {
    print("deviceDidRotate")
}

To work around this you could hold the previous device orientation and check for a change in deviceDidRotate().

var previousDeviceOrientation: UIDeviceOrientation = UIDevice.current.orientation

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
    NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(
        self, 
        selector:  #selector(deviceDidRotate), 
        name: .UIDeviceOrientationDidChange, 
        object: nil
    )
}

func deviceDidRotate() {
    if UIDevice.current.orientation == previousDeviceOrientation { return }
    previousDeviceOrientation = UIDevice.current.orientation
    print("deviceDidRotate")
}

Or you can use a different notification that only gets called when the device changes from landscape to portrait. In this case you'd want to use the UIApplicationDidChangeStatusBarOrientation notification.

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
    NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(
        self, 
        selector:  #selector(deviceDidRotate), 
        name: .UIApplicationDidChangeStatusBarOrientation, 
        object: nil
    )
}

func deviceDidRotate() {
    print("deviceDidRotate")
}
6

Full working implementation of how to detect orientation change in Swift 3.0.

I chose to use this implementation because phone orientations of face up and face down were important to me, and I wanted the view to change only once I knew the orientation was in the specified position.

import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        //1
        NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(deviceOrientationDidChange), name: NSNotification.Name.UIDeviceOrientationDidChange, object: nil)

    }

    deinit {
        //3
        NotificationCenter.default.removeObserver(self, name: NSNotification.Name.UIDeviceOrientationDidChange, object: nil)
    }

    func deviceOrientationDidChange() {
        //2
        switch UIDevice.current.orientation {
        case .faceDown:
            print("Face down")
        case .faceUp:
            print("Face up")
        case .unknown:
            print("Unknown")
        case .landscapeLeft:
            print("Landscape left")
        case .landscapeRight:
            print("Landscape right")
        case .portrait:
            print("Portrait")
        case .portraitUpsideDown:
            print("Portrait upside down")
        }
    }

}

The important pieces to note are:

  1. You listen to the DeviceOrientationDidChange notification stream and tie it to the function deviceOrientationDidChange
  2. You then switch on the device orientation, be sure to take notice that there is an unknown orientation at times.
  3. Like any notification, before the viewController is deinitialized, make sure to stop observing the notification stream.

Hope someone finds this helpful.

3
  • Thank you , great Feb 13, 2017 at 14:16
  • So I'm confused, currently all my views adjust based on portrait to landscape, but it doesnt change if the device is face-up? How would I use your above code to achieve the same effect when its face-up!?
    – Famic Tech
    Apr 13, 2017 at 18:35
  • Can you give a little more context? I'm not sure what effect you're referring to. This code works to simply detect orientation. If you're using multiple methods for detecting orientation you might run into trouble. Apr 13, 2017 at 19:04
6
override func didRotate(from fromInterfaceOrientation: UIInterfaceOrientation) {
    //swift 3
    getScreenSize()
}


func getScreenSize(){
   let screenWidth = UIScreen.main.bounds.width
   let  screenHeight = UIScreen.main.bounds.height
    print("SCREEN RESOLUTION: \(screenWidth.description) x \(screenHeight.description)")
}
2
  • Cleanest answer. Worked for me.
    – Dorad
    Oct 20, 2016 at 13:49
  • This is now deprecated
    – azizj
    Feb 22, 2017 at 19:01
6

If you want to do something AFTER the rotation is complete, you can use the UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator completion handler like this

public override func viewWillTransition(to size: CGSize, with coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator) {
    super.viewWillTransition(to: size, with: coordinator)

    // Hook in to the rotation animation completion handler
    coordinator.animate(alongsideTransition: nil) { (_) in
        // Updates to your UI...
        self.tableView.reloadData()
    }
}
6

Swift 4:

override func viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
    NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(deviceRotated), name: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification, object: nil)
}

override func viewWillDisappear(_ animated: Bool) {
    NotificationCenter.default.removeObserver(self, name: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification, object: nil)
}

@objc func deviceRotated(){
    if UIDevice.current.orientation.isLandscape {
        //Code here
    } else {
        //Code here
    }
}

A lot of answers dont help when needing to detect across various view controllers. This one does the trick.

3
  • You also need to check if device was rotated while the view controller was disappeared (in case of other view controller is opened above current). In fact, you can skip viewWillDisappear and add addObserver in viewDidLoad. iOS unsubscribes view controller automatically. Feb 18, 2019 at 19:33
  • you forgot UIDevice.current.orientation.isFlat
    – user924
    May 14, 2019 at 17:37
  • @Joel this does not work when the Phone Orientation is Locked. Any idea how that can be fixed? Apr 16, 2021 at 12:23
4

Check if rotation had changed with: viewWillTransitionToSize(size: CGSize, withTransitionCoordinator coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator)

With the coordinator.animateAlongsideTransition(nil) { (UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinatorContext) you can check if the transition is finished.

See code below:

override func viewWillTransitionToSize(size: CGSize, withTransitionCoordinator coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator) {

    super.viewWillTransitionToSize(size, withTransitionCoordinator: coordinator)

    coordinator.animateAlongsideTransition(nil) { (UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinatorContext) in
        // if you want to execute code after transition finished
        print("Transition finished")
    }

    if size.height < size.width {
        // Landscape
        print("Landscape")
    } else {
        // Portrait
        print("Portrait")
    }

}
0
4

Here is an easy way to detect the device orientation: (Swift 3)

override func willRotate(to toInterfaceOrientation: UIInterfaceOrientation, duration: TimeInterval) {
            handleViewRotaion(orientation: toInterfaceOrientation)
        }

    //MARK: - Rotation controls
    func handleViewRotaion(orientation:UIInterfaceOrientation) -> Void {
        switch orientation {
        case .portrait :
            print("portrait view")
            break
        case .portraitUpsideDown :
            print("portraitUpsideDown view")
            break
        case .landscapeLeft :
            print("landscapeLeft view")
            break
        case .landscapeRight :
            print("landscapeRight view")
            break
        case .unknown :
            break
        }
    }
1
  • 3
    willRotate is deprecated now, better use viewWillTransition.
    – pre
    Jul 18, 2017 at 12:24
4

Swift 5

Setup class to receive notifications of device orientation change:

class MyClass {

    ...

    init (...) {

        ...

        super.init(...)

        // subscribe to device orientation change notifications
        UIDevice.current.beginGeneratingDeviceOrientationNotifications()
        NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(orientationChanged), name: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification, object: nil)

        ...

    }

    ...

}

Setup handler code:

@objc extension MyClass {
    func orientationChanged(_ notification: NSNotification) {
        let device = notification.object as! UIDevice
        let deviceOrientation = device.orientation

        switch deviceOrientation {
        case .landscapeLeft:   //do something for landscape left
        case .landscapeRight:  //do something for landscape right
        case .portrait:        //do something for portrait
        case .portraitUpsideDown: //do something for portrait upside-down 
        case .faceDown:        //do something for face down
        case .faceUp:          //do something for face up
        case .unknown:         //handle unknown
        @unknown default:      //handle unknown default
        }
    }
}
0
3

My approach is similar to what bpedit shows above, but with an iOS 9+ focus. I wanted to change the scope of the FSCalendar when the view rotates.

override func viewWillTransitionToSize(size: CGSize, withTransitionCoordinator coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator) {
    super.viewWillTransitionToSize(size, withTransitionCoordinator: coordinator)

    coordinator.animateAlongsideTransition({ (context) in
        if size.height < size.width {
            self.calendar.setScope(.Week, animated: true)
            self.calendar.appearance.cellShape = .Rectangle
        }
        else {
            self.calendar.appearance.cellShape = .Circle
            self.calendar.setScope(.Month, animated: true)

        }

        }, completion: nil)
}

This below worked, but I felt sheepish about it :)

coordinator.animateAlongsideTransition({ (context) in
        if size.height < size.width {
            self.calendar.scope = .Week
            self.calendar.appearance.cellShape = .Rectangle
        }
        }) { (context) in
            if size.height > size.width {
                self.calendar.scope = .Month
                self.calendar.appearance.cellShape = .Circle
            }
    }
2

I use UIUserInterfaceSizeClass to detect a orientation changed in a UIViewController class just like that:

override func willTransition(to newCollection: UITraitCollection, with coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator) {

    let isiPadLandscapePortrait = newCollection.horizontalSizeClass == .regular && newCollection.verticalSizeClass == .regular
    let isiPhonePlustLandscape = newCollection.horizontalSizeClass == .regular && newCollection.verticalSizeClass == .compact
    let isiPhonePortrait = newCollection.horizontalSizeClass == .compact && newCollection.verticalSizeClass == .regular
    let isiPhoneLandscape = newCollection.horizontalSizeClass == .compact && newCollection.verticalSizeClass == .compact

     if isiPhonePortrait {
         // do something...
     }
}
1

For Swift 3

override func viewWillTransition(to size: CGSize, with coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator) {
    if UIDevice.current.orientation.isLandscape {
        //Landscape
    }
    else if UIDevice.current.orientation.isFlat {
        //isFlat
    }
    else {
        //Portrait
    }
}
1
  • you forgot UIDevice.current.orientation.isFlat
    – user924
    May 14, 2019 at 17:36
1

With iOS 13.1.2, orientation always return 0 until device is rotated. I need to call UIDevice.current.beginGeneratingDeviceOrientationNotifications() before any rotation event occurs to get actual rotation.

0
- (void)viewDidLoad {
  [super viewDidLoad];
  [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter]addObserver:self selector:@selector(OrientationDidChange:) name:UIDeviceOrientationDidChangeNotification object:nil];
}

-(void)OrientationDidChange:(NSNotification*)notification {
  UIDeviceOrientation Orientation=[[UIDevice currentDevice]orientation];

  if(Orientation==UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeLeft || Orientation==UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeRight) {
    NSLog(@"Landscape");
  } else if(Orientation==UIDeviceOrientationPortrait) {
    NSLog(@"Potrait Mode");
  }
}

NOTE: Just use this code to identify UIViewController is in which orientation

1
  • Your code is not working in project. do I need to do anything else as well? Sep 17, 2018 at 12:06
0
override func viewDidLoad() {
    NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(MyController.rotated), name: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification, object: nil)
//...
}

@objc
private func rotated() {
    if UIDevice.current.orientation.isLandscape {

    } else if UIDevice.current.orientation.isPortrait {

    }

    //or you can check orientation separately UIDevice.current.orientation
    //portrait, portraitUpsideDown, landscapeLeft, landscapeRight... 

}

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