273

The situation is somewhat like-

var someVar = some_other_function();
someObj.addEventListener("click", function(){
    some_function(someVar);
}, false);

The problem is that the value of someVar is not visible inside the listener function of the addEventListener, where it is probably being treated as a new variable.

28 Answers 28

187

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the code you've written. Both some_function and someVar should be accessible, in case they were available in the context where anonymous

function() { some_function(someVar); } 

was created.

Check if the alert gives you the value you've been looking for, be sure it will be accessible in the scope of anonymous function (unless you have more code that operates on the same someVar variable next to the call to addEventListener)

var someVar; 
someVar = some_other_function();
alert(someVar);
someObj.addEventListener("click", function(){
    some_function(someVar);
}, false);
  • 75
    This doesn't work in for loop. I always get the latest value and not the one which belonged to that iteration. Any solution? – iMatoria Jun 25 '11 at 17:19
  • 5
    Anybody knows why it doesn't work in loop? What's the reason of that behaviour? – Morfidon May 15 '15 at 1:23
  • 3
    @Morfidon because the function with global variables act as closures in javascript which means they remembers the environment outside their lexical scope . If you just create different function in same environment then they will reference to same environment. – bugwheels94 May 20 '15 at 15:58
  • 12
    @Morfidon: In a loop, the value of someVar is not the value it had when the listener was added, but the value it has when the listener is executed. When the listener is executed, the loop has already ended, so the value of someVar will be the value it had when the loop ended. – www.admiraalit.nl Oct 29 '15 at 16:45
  • 4
    @iMatoria I have just discovered that creating a bound function using the .bind() method will solve the issue with loops developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Luke T O'Brien Jun 22 '17 at 9:46
318

Why not just get the arguments from the target attribute of the event?

Example:

var someInput = document.querySelector('input');
someInput.addEventListener('click', myFunc, false);
someInput.myParam = 'This is my parameter';
function myFunc(evt)
{
  window.alert(evt.currentTarget.myParam);
}

JavaScript is a prototype-oriented language, remember!

  • 6
    Should be ticked as the accepted answer - much the cleanest neatest way of doing it! – Velojet Oct 25 '16 at 5:20
  • 14
    This is the correct answer becouse it let us to use after the 'removeEventListener' function. – user5260143 Dec 4 '16 at 12:52
  • 14
    Shouldn't it be evt.currentTarget.myParam? If there is another element inside the 'someInput', the evt.target may be refer to the inner element. (jsfiddle.net/qp5zguay/1) – Herbertusz Jan 24 '17 at 19:58
  • 4
    I like this answer the best! Should be the correct answer. – Rob Sobers Apr 11 '17 at 19:37
  • 3
    This should be the accepted answer! – stingMantis Apr 21 '17 at 20:10
55

This question is old but I thought I'd offer an alternative using ES5's .bind() - for posterity. :)

function some_func(otherFunc, ev) {
    // magic happens
}
someObj.addEventListener("click", some_func.bind(null, some_other_func), false);

Just be aware that you need to set up your listener function with the first param as the argument you're passing into bind (your other function) and the second param is now the event (instead of the first, as it would have been).

  • 1
    Function.prototype.bind() is really the best way to solve this issue. Plus it works intuitively inside loops—you get the lexical scope you want. No anonymous functions, IIFEs, or special properties tacked on to objects. – Clint Pachl Mar 11 '18 at 10:14
  • See the pros and cons of IIFE vs bind(). – Clint Pachl Mar 11 '18 at 10:17
  • 1
    By using Function.prototype.bind() you can't remove the event listener, better to use a currying function instead (see @tomcek112 answer) – pldg Sep 17 at 16:01
25

You can just bind all necessary arguments with 'bind':

root.addEventListener('click', myPrettyHandler.bind(null, event, arg1, ... ));

In this way you'll always get the event, arg1, and other stuff passed to myPrettyHandler.

http://passy.svbtle.com/partial-application-in-javascript-using-bind

  • Thanks! Had already tried .bind() but without the null as first param. which didn't work. – Larphoid Dec 29 '18 at 19:47
  • 1
    This worked for me after I'd tried a lot of other potential solutions online that didn't. Thanks. – Matt West Mar 1 at 18:57
  • no need for null, it works fine with .bind(event, arg1), at least with VueJS. – DevonDahon Oct 18 at 6:55
22

Quite and old question but I had the same issue today. Cleanest solution I found is to use the concept of currying.

The code for that:

someObj.addEventListener('click', some_function(someVar));

var some_function = function(someVar) {
    return function curried_func(e) {
        // do something here
    }
}

By naming the curried function it allows you to call Object.removeEventListener to unregister the eventListener at a later execution time.

  • 4
    Glad to encounter this answer mentioning curried function. How would you remove event listener though? – bob Sep 24 '17 at 15:43
  • 3
    Awesome to see good terminology. You should be able to remove the event listener by naming the curried function. i'll propose an edit. – Matthew Brent May 1 '18 at 15:16
  • That's definitely cool and new to me. I'll study this concept. Thanks tomcek! – Brigo Jan 11 at 14:51
  • Really excellent answer, my dear brother. You saved my time – Ashok kumar Jun 3 at 11:17
  • This answer will register the function as many times as addEventListener is called, since some_function (var) is returning a newly created function every time. – Yahia Jun 25 at 7:27
18

You can add and remove eventlisteners with arguments by declaring a function as a variable.

myaudio.addEventListener('ended',funcName=function(){newSrc(myaudio)},false);

newSrc is the method with myaudio as parameter funcName is the function name variable

You can remove the listener with myaudio.removeEventListener('ended',func,false);

11

You could pass somevar by value(not by reference) via a javascript feature known as closure:

var someVar='origin';
func = function(v){
    console.log(v);
}
document.addEventListener('click',function(someVar){
   return function(){func(someVar)}
}(someVar));
someVar='changed'

Or you could write a common wrap function such as wrapEventCallback:

function wrapEventCallback(callback){
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
    return function(e){
        callback.apply(this, args)
    }
}
var someVar='origin';
func = function(v){
    console.log(v);
}
document.addEventListener('click',wrapEventCallback(func,someVar))
someVar='changed'

Here wrapEventCallback(func,var1,var2) is like:

func.bind(null, var1,var2)
  • 1
    Thanks a lot for this answer ! The OP was not looking for this, but I think people who type "How to pass args to addEventListener" into google will be looking for your answer. It just needs a bit more explanation :) I'm editing it. – Sindarus Aug 10 '16 at 17:50
  • Isn't this wrong, somewar, will be click event? – Suraj Jain May 5 '18 at 12:57
9

someVar value should be accessible only in some_function() context, not from listener's. If you like to have it within listener, you must do something like:

someObj.addEventListener("click",
                         function(){
                             var newVar = someVar;
                             some_function(someVar);
                         },
                         false);

and use newVar instead.

The other way is to return someVar value from some_function() for using it further in listener (as a new local var):

var someVar = some_function(someVar);
9

Here's yet another way (This one works inside for loops):

var someVar = some_other_function();
someObj.addEventListener("click", 

function(theVar){
    return function(){some_function(theVar)};
}(someVar),

false);
  • 2
    This is the best way. Ugly, but effective within loops since by sending an argument into an anonymous function will capture the var. – bob Jul 2 '15 at 21:45
8

Function.prototype.bind() is the way to bind a target function to a particular scope and optionally define the this object within the target function.

someObj.addEventListener("click", some_function.bind(this), false);

Or to capture some of the lexical scope, for example in a loop:

someObj.addEventListener("click", some_function.bind(this, arg1, arg2), false);

Finally, if the this parameter is not needed within the target function:

someObj.addEventListener("click", some_function.bind(null, arg1, arg2), false);
  • Hi dude, 10000 thanks to you. Do you know, I found your answer after 2 hours long tiy. – Ashok kumar Jun 3 at 12:12
7

Use

   el.addEventListener('click',
    function(){
        // this will give you the id value 
        alert(this.id);    
    },
false);

And if you want to pass any custom value into this anonymous function then the easiest way to do it is

 // this will dynamically create property a property
 // you can create anything like el.<your  variable>
 el.myvalue = "hello world";
 el.addEventListener('click',
    function(){
        //this will show you the myvalue 
        alert(el.myvalue);
        // this will give you the id value 
        alert(this.id);    
    },
false);

Works perfectly in my project. Hope this will help

3

Sending arguments to an eventListener's callback function requires creating an isolated function and passing arguments to that isolated function.

Here's a nice little helper function you can use. Based on "hello world's" example above.)

One thing that is also needed is to maintain a reference to the function so we can remove the listener cleanly.

// Lambda closure chaos.
//
// Send an anonymous function to the listener, but execute it immediately.
// This will cause the arguments are captured, which is useful when running 
// within loops.
//
// The anonymous function returns a closure, that will be executed when 
// the event triggers. And since the arguments were captured, any vars 
// that were sent in will be unique to the function.

function addListenerWithArgs(elem, evt, func, vars){
    var f = function(ff, vv){
            return (function (){
                ff(vv);
            });
    }(func, vars);

    elem.addEventListener(evt, f);

    return f;
}

// Usage:

function doSomething(withThis){
    console.log("withThis", withThis);
}

// Capture the function so we can remove it later.
var storeFunc = addListenerWithArgs(someElem, "click", doSomething, "foo");

// To remove the listener, use the normal routine:
someElem.removeEventListener("click", storeFunc);
  • This answer is from '15 but it's exactly what I needed to handle this issue with using a useRef hook. If you're using a ref hook and needed a listener for it that you can clean up on component unmounting, this is it. The 4th arg to storeFunc should be your ref variable. Put your listener removal in a useEffect like this and you're good to go: useEffect(() => { return () => { window.removeEventListener('scroll', storeFunc, false); } }, [storeFunc]) – Rob B Sep 5 at 14:48
3

One way is doing this with an outer function:

elem.addEventListener('click', (function(numCopy) {
  return function() {
    alert(numCopy)
  };
})(num));

This method of wrapping an anonymous function in parentheses and calling it right away is called an IIFE (Immediately-Invoked Function Expression)

You can check an example with two parameters in http://codepen.io/froucher/pen/BoWwgz.

catimg.addEventListener('click', (function(c, i){
  return function() {
    c.meows++;
    i.textContent = c.name + '\'s meows are: ' + c.meows;
  }
})(cat, catmeows));
3

If I'm not mistaken using calling the function with bind actually creates a new function that is returned by the bind method. This will cause you problems later or if you would like to remove the event listener, as it's basically like an anonymous function:

// Possible:
function myCallback() { /* code here */ }
someObject.addEventListener('event', myCallback);
someObject.removeEventListener('event', myCallback);

// Not Possible:
function myCallback() { /* code here */ }
someObject.addEventListener('event', function() { myCallback });
someObject.removeEventListener('event', /* can't remove anonymous function */);

So take that in mind.

If you are using ES6 you could do the same as suggested but a bit cleaner:

someObject.addEventListener('event', () => myCallback(params));
3
    $form.addEventListener('submit', save.bind(null, data, keyword, $name.value, myStemComment));
    function save(data, keyword, name, comment, event) {

This is how I got event passed properly.

  • Excellent, this is how I was almost concluding - just wrongly passed extra event in bind when it is not there (like in angular), which automatically comes in this case. – Manohar Reddy Poreddy Oct 20 at 4:59
2

Also try these (IE8 + Chrome. I dont know for FF):

function addEvent(obj, type, fn) {
    eval('obj.on'+type+'=fn');
}

function removeEvent(obj, type) {
    eval('obj.on'+type+'=null');
}

// Use :

function someFunction (someArg) {alert(someArg);}

var object=document.getElementById('somObject_id') ;
var someArg="Hi there !";
var func=function(){someFunction (someArg)};

// mouseover is inactive
addEvent (object, 'mouseover', func);
// mouseover is now active
addEvent (object, 'mouseover');
// mouseover is inactive

Hope there is no typos :-)

  • How hard would it be to put a complete answer? Should i test this on FF? Well, I wont bother ... – StefanNch May 30 '13 at 10:24
2

I was stuck in this as I was using it in a loop for finding elements and adding listner to it. If you're using it in a loop, then this will work perfectly

for (var i = 0; i < states_array.length; i++) {
     var link = document.getElementById('apply_'+states_array[i].state_id);
     link.my_id = i;
     link.addEventListener('click', function(e) {   
        alert(e.target.my_id);        
        some_function(states_array[e.target.my_id].css_url);
     });
}
1
    var EV = {
        ev: '',
        fn: '',
        elem: '',
        add: function () {
            this.elem.addEventListener(this.ev, this.fn, false);
        }
    };

    function cons() {
        console.log('some what');
    }

    EV.ev = 'click';
    EV.fn = cons;
    EV.elem = document.getElementById('body');
    EV.add();

//If you want to add one more listener for load event then simply add this two lines of code:

    EV.ev = 'load';
    EV.add();
1

The following approach worked well for me. Modified from here.

function callback(theVar) {
  return function() {
    theVar();
  }
}

function some_other_function() {
  document.body.innerHTML += "made it.";
}

var someVar = some_other_function;
document.getElementById('button').addEventListener('click', callback(someVar));
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <body>
    <button type="button" id="button">Click Me!</button>
  </body>
</html>

1

nice one line alternative

element.addEventListener('dragstart',(evt) => onDragStart(param1, param2, param3, evt));
function onDragStart(param1, param2, param3, evt) {

 //some action...

}
0

The following answer is correct but the below code is not working in IE8 if suppose you compressed the js file using yuicompressor. (In fact,still most of the US peoples using IE8)

var someVar; 
someVar = some_other_function();
alert(someVar);
someObj.addEventListener("click",
                         function(){
                          some_function(someVar);
                         },
                         false);

So, we can fix the above issue as follows and it works fine in all browsers

var someVar, eventListnerFunc;
someVar = some_other_function();
eventListnerFunc = some_function(someVar);
someObj.addEventListener("click", eventListnerFunc, false);

Hope, it would be useful for some one who is compressing the js file in production environment.

Good Luck!!

0

There is a special variable inside all functions: arguments. You can pass your parameters as anonymous parameters and access them (by order) through the arguments variable.

Example:

var someVar = some_other_function();
someObj.addEventListener("click", function(someVar){
    some_function(arguments[0]);
}, false);
  • Hmm... What's the reason for the downvote? If it was not what you where looking for, then please explain more clearly what you mean (I know that the question has been answered already). But isn't my code answering what you asked for? The special variable "arguments" gives you access to all parameters inside a function. – StanE Mar 2 '15 at 23:07
0

The following code worked fine for me (firefox):

for (var i=0; i<3; i++) {
   element = new ...   // create your element
   element.counter = i;
   element.addEventListener('click', function(e){
        console.log(this.counter);
        ...            // another code with this element
   }, false);
}

Output:

0
1
2
  • What in the world is this? – NiCk Newman Jul 6 '15 at 12:27
0

You need:

newElem.addEventListener('click', {
    handleEvent: function (event) {
        clickImg(parameter);
    }
});
0

Probably not optimal, but simple enough for those not super js savvy. Put the function that calls addEventListener into its own function. That way any function values passed into it maintain their own scope and you can iterate over that function as much as you want.

Example I worked out with file reading as I needed to capture and render a preview of the image and filename. It took me awhile to avoid asynchronous issues when utilizing a multiple file upload type. I would accidentally see the same 'name' on all renders despite uploading different files.

Originally, all the readFile() function was within the readFiles() function. This caused asynchronous scoping issues.

    function readFiles(input) {
      if (input.files) {
        for(i=0;i<input.files.length;i++) {

          var filename = input.files[i].name;

          if ( /\.(jpe?g|jpg|png|gif|svg|bmp)$/i.test(filename) ) {
            readFile(input.files[i],filename);
          }
       }
      }
    } //end readFiles



    function readFile(file,filename) {
            var reader = new FileReader();

            reader.addEventListener("load", function() { alert(filename);}, false);

            reader.readAsDataURL(file);

    } //end readFile
0

just would like to add. if anyone is adding a function which updates checkboxes to an event listener, you would have to use event.target instead of this to update the checkboxes.

-1

Other alternative, perhaps not as elegant as the use of bind, but it is valid for events in a loop

for (var key in catalog){
    document.getElementById(key).my_id = key
    document.getElementById(key).addEventListener('click', function(e) {
        editorContent.loadCatalogEntry(e.srcElement.my_id)
    }, false);
}

It has been tested for google chrome extensions and maybe e.srcElement must be replaced by e.source in other browsers

I found this solution using the comment posted by Imatoria but I cannot mark it as useful because I do not have enough reputation :D

-1

This solution may good for looking

var some_other_function = someVar => function() {
}

someObj.addEventListener('click', some_other_function(someVar));

or bind valiables will be also good

  • This exact answer was already posted – Kai Nov 6 '18 at 20:27

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