490

The situation is somewhat like-

var someVar = some_other_function();
someObj.addEventListener("click", function(){
    some_function(someVar);
}, false);

The problem is that the value of someVar is not visible inside the listener function of the addEventListener, where it is probably being treated as a new variable.

2
  • Not the cleanest way, but does the job. Note that if someVar could only be digit or text: eval('someObj.addEventListener("click",function(){some_function('+someVar+');});');
    – Ignas2526
    Jun 27, 2014 at 16:37
  • Just had this issue today - solution given here is correct (other solutions have issues like for loop issue, etc.) - stackoverflow.com/a/54731362/984471 Oct 20, 2019 at 5:00

36 Answers 36

526

Why not just get the arguments from the target attribute of the event?

Example:

const someInput = document.querySelector('button');
someInput.addEventListener('click', myFunc, false);
someInput.myParam = 'This is my parameter';
function myFunc(evt)
{
  window.alert(evt.currentTarget.myParam);
}
<button class="input">Show parameter</button>

JavaScript is a prototype-oriented language, remember!

10
  • 39
    This is the correct answer becouse it let us to use after the 'removeEventListener' function. Dec 4, 2016 at 12:52
  • 23
    Shouldn't it be evt.currentTarget.myParam? If there is another element inside the 'someInput', the evt.target may be refer to the inner element. (jsfiddle.net/qp5zguay/1)
    – Herbertusz
    Jan 24, 2017 at 19:58
  • 3
    My variables keep coming back as undefined... any thoughts on how to fix that?
    – nomaam
    Sep 5, 2018 at 1:48
  • 5
    If addEventListener is for document, evt.target.myParam didn't work for me. I had to use evt.currentTarget.myParam instead. Jul 8, 2019 at 18:15
  • 2
    it's not advisable to add custom/additional attribute to DOMElement
    – Velaro
    Feb 10, 2022 at 15:33
299

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the code you've written. Both some_function and someVar should be accessible, in case they were available in the context where anonymous

function() { some_function(someVar); } 

was created.

Check if the alert gives you the value you've been looking for, be sure it will be accessible in the scope of anonymous function (unless you have more code that operates on the same someVar variable next to the call to addEventListener)

var someVar; 
someVar = some_other_function();
alert(someVar);
someObj.addEventListener("click", function(){
    some_function(someVar);
}, false);
13
  • 115
    This doesn't work in for loop. I always get the latest value and not the one which belonged to that iteration. Any solution?
    – iMatoria
    Jun 25, 2011 at 17:19
  • 7
    Anybody knows why it doesn't work in loop? What's the reason of that behaviour?
    – Morfidon
    May 15, 2015 at 1:23
  • 28
    @Morfidon: In a loop, the value of someVar is not the value it had when the listener was added, but the value it has when the listener is executed. When the listener is executed, the loop has already ended, so the value of someVar will be the value it had when the loop ended. Oct 29, 2015 at 16:45
  • 5
    This is not correct answer becouse it not let us to use the 'removeEventListener' function after. Dec 4, 2016 at 12:52
  • 8
    @iMatoria I have just discovered that creating a bound function using the .bind() method will solve the issue with loops developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… Jun 22, 2017 at 9:46
127

This question is old but I thought I'd offer an alternative using ES5's .bind() - for posterity. :)

function some_func(otherFunc, ev) {
    // magic happens
}
someObj.addEventListener("click", some_func.bind(null, some_other_func), false);

Just be aware that you need to set up your listener function with the first param as the argument you're passing into bind (your other function) and the second param is now the event (instead of the first, as it would have been).

5
  • 4
    Function.prototype.bind() is really the best way to solve this issue. Plus it works intuitively inside loops—you get the lexical scope you want. No anonymous functions, IIFEs, or special properties tacked on to objects. Mar 11, 2018 at 10:14
  • See the pros and cons of IIFE vs bind(). Mar 11, 2018 at 10:17
  • 14
    By using Function.prototype.bind() you can't remove the event listener, better to use a currying function instead (see @tomcek112 answer)
    – pldg
    Sep 17, 2019 at 16:01
  • 1
    NOTE: some_other_func is a variable, you can pass whatever value you want to some_func. Jan 7, 2020 at 19:41
  • Any reference for the event to be the last param?
    – Dante
    Dec 6, 2022 at 15:04
86

Quite and old question but I had the same issue today. Cleanest solution I found is to use the concept of currying.

The code for that:

someObj.addEventListener('click', some_function(someVar));

var some_function = function(someVar) {
    return function curried_func(e) {
        // do something here
    }
}

By naming the curried function it allows you to call Object.removeEventListener to unregister the eventListener at a later execution time.

11
  • 8
    Glad to encounter this answer mentioning curried function. How would you remove event listener though?
    – bob
    Sep 24, 2017 at 15:43
  • 4
    Awesome to see good terminology. You should be able to remove the event listener by naming the curried function. i'll propose an edit. May 1, 2018 at 15:16
  • 2
    This answer will register the function as many times as addEventListener is called, since some_function (var) is returning a newly created function every time.
    – Yahia
    Jun 25, 2019 at 7:27
  • 2
    i dont like the idea of having to name the curried function in order to remove the listener cuz then ur dealing with 2 diff namespaces that u gotta keep track of
    – oldboy
    Nov 19, 2019 at 0:24
  • 2
    @martin36 notice the durrying structure, you have a currying function and a curried function. You should add and remove the currying function as evente listener. in @tomeck112's example, that is some_function Apr 10, 2021 at 12:20
47

You can just bind all necessary arguments with 'bind':

root.addEventListener('click', myPrettyHandler.bind(null, event, arg1, ... ));

In this way you'll always get the event, arg1, and other stuff passed to myPrettyHandler.

http://passy.svbtle.com/partial-application-in-javascript-using-bind

2
  • 1
    Thanks! Had already tried .bind() but without the null as first param. which didn't work.
    – Larphoid
    Dec 29, 2018 at 19:47
  • no need for null, it works fine with .bind(event, arg1), at least with VueJS.
    – DevonDahon
    Oct 18, 2019 at 6:55
44

nice one line alternative

element.addEventListener('dragstart',(evt) => onDragStart(param1, param2, param3, evt));
function onDragStart(param1, param2, param3, evt) {

 //some action...

}
4
  • 1
    As a new JS dev, going through all the confusing answers, I found this one to be the best solution. Thanks! Aug 18, 2021 at 6:31
  • 3
    @purple_turtle, I've been working with JS for over 8 years and I still found this answer the most helpful for me. Mar 14, 2022 at 19:52
  • Thank you. This is the only solution that actually answers the question.
    – Dan
    Apr 25, 2022 at 16:34
  • 15
    Problem with this answer is that it won't allow you to use removeEventListener, if you are ever in need for it...
    – Narxx
    May 9, 2022 at 4:53
26

You can add and remove eventlisteners with arguments by declaring a function as a variable.

myaudio.addEventListener('ended',funcName=function(){newSrc(myaudio)},false);

newSrc is the method with myaudio as parameter funcName is the function name variable

You can remove the listener with myaudio.removeEventListener('ended',func,false);

2
  • 2
    remove listener with myaudio.removeEventListener('ended',funcName,false); funcName not func :) I couldn't edit your post as edits must be at least 6 characters...
    – jeremyj11
    Mar 18, 2022 at 8:51
  • For me this is throwing an error: funcName is not defined. Apr 20, 2023 at 12:29
20

Function.prototype.bind() is the way to bind a target function to a particular scope and optionally define the this object within the target function.

someObj.addEventListener("click", some_function.bind(this), false);

Or to capture some of the lexical scope, for example in a loop:

someObj.addEventListener("click", some_function.bind(this, arg1, arg2), false);

Finally, if the this parameter is not needed within the target function:

someObj.addEventListener("click", some_function.bind(null, arg1, arg2), false);
0
19

You could pass somevar by value(not by reference) via a javascript feature known as closure:

var someVar='origin';
func = function(v){
    console.log(v);
}
document.addEventListener('click',function(someVar){
   return function(){func(someVar)}
}(someVar));
someVar='changed'

Or you could write a common wrap function such as wrapEventCallback:

function wrapEventCallback(callback){
    var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
    return function(e){
        callback.apply(this, args)
    }
}
var someVar='origin';
func = function(v){
    console.log(v);
}
document.addEventListener('click',wrapEventCallback(func,someVar))
someVar='changed'

Here wrapEventCallback(func,var1,var2) is like:

func.bind(null, var1,var2)
1
  • 3
    Thanks a lot for this answer ! The OP was not looking for this, but I think people who type "How to pass args to addEventListener" into google will be looking for your answer. It just needs a bit more explanation :) I'm editing it.
    – Sindarus
    Aug 10, 2016 at 17:50
13

Here's yet another way (This one works inside for loops):

var someVar = some_other_function();
someObj.addEventListener("click", 

function(theVar){
    return function(){some_function(theVar)};
}(someVar),

false);
2
  • 3
    This is the best way. Ugly, but effective within loops since by sending an argument into an anonymous function will capture the var.
    – bob
    Jul 2, 2015 at 21:45
  • Can you explain what the heck is going on here? Jul 26, 2022 at 21:29
12

someVar value should be accessible only in some_function() context, not from listener's. If you like to have it within listener, you must do something like:

someObj.addEventListener("click",
                         function(){
                             var newVar = someVar;
                             some_function(someVar);
                         },
                         false);

and use newVar instead.

The other way is to return someVar value from some_function() for using it further in listener (as a new local var):

var someVar = some_function(someVar);
12

one easy way to execute that may be this

    window.addEventListener('click', (e) => functionHandler(e, ...args));

Works for me.

8

If I'm not mistaken using calling the function with bind actually creates a new function that is returned by the bind method. This will cause you problems later or if you would like to remove the event listener, as it's basically like an anonymous function:

// Possible:
function myCallback() { /* code here */ }
someObject.addEventListener('event', myCallback);
someObject.removeEventListener('event', myCallback);

// Not Possible:
function myCallback() { /* code here */ }
someObject.addEventListener('event', function() { myCallback });
someObject.removeEventListener('event', /* can't remove anonymous function */);

So take that in mind.

If you are using ES6 you could do the same as suggested but a bit cleaner:

someObject.addEventListener('event', () => myCallback(params));
1
  • 1
    but that's an anonymous function in the ES6 example, no? could solve by binding the function and assigning it to a different variable. can then use removeEventListener('event', someDifferentBoundedFunction)
    – NickW
    Jan 17, 2022 at 17:07
8
    $form.addEventListener('submit', save.bind(null, data, keyword, $name.value, myStemComment));
    function save(data, keyword, name, comment, event) {

This is how I got event passed properly.

2
  • Excellent, this is how I was almost concluding - just wrongly passed extra event in bind when it is not there (like in angular), which automatically comes in this case. Oct 20, 2019 at 4:59
  • Yeah, this works. Thanks. What's the null in the first argument? And how can I also pass this object for binding? Jul 31, 2020 at 11:19
7

Use

   el.addEventListener('click',
    function(){
        // this will give you the id value 
        alert(this.id);    
    },
false);

And if you want to pass any custom value into this anonymous function then the easiest way to do it is

 // this will dynamically create property a property
 // you can create anything like el.<your  variable>
 el.myvalue = "hello world";
 el.addEventListener('click',
    function(){
        //this will show you the myvalue 
        alert(el.myvalue);
        // this will give you the id value 
        alert(this.id);    
    },
false);

Works perfectly in my project. Hope this will help

1
  • Yes, definitely helped, as it also maintained the expected scope within a for loop.
    – j4v1
    Mar 25, 2020 at 18:34
5

One way is doing this with an outer function:

elem.addEventListener('click', (function(numCopy) {
  return function() {
    alert(numCopy)
  };
})(num));

This method of wrapping an anonymous function in parentheses and calling it right away is called an IIFE (Immediately-Invoked Function Expression)

You can check an example with two parameters in http://codepen.io/froucher/pen/BoWwgz.

catimg.addEventListener('click', (function(c, i){
  return function() {
    c.meows++;
    i.textContent = c.name + '\'s meows are: ' + c.meows;
  }
})(cat, catmeows));
5

In 2019, lots of api changes, the best answer no longer works, without fix bug.

share some working code.

Inspired by all above answer.

 button_element = document.getElementById('your-button')

 button_element.setAttribute('your-parameter-name',your-parameter-value);

 button_element.addEventListener('click', your_function);


 function your_function(event)
   {
      //when click print the parameter value 
      console.log(event.currentTarget.attributes.your-parameter-name.value;)
   }
4

Sending arguments to an eventListener's callback function requires creating an isolated function and passing arguments to that isolated function.

Here's a nice little helper function you can use. Based on "hello world's" example above.)

One thing that is also needed is to maintain a reference to the function so we can remove the listener cleanly.

// Lambda closure chaos.
//
// Send an anonymous function to the listener, but execute it immediately.
// This will cause the arguments are captured, which is useful when running 
// within loops.
//
// The anonymous function returns a closure, that will be executed when 
// the event triggers. And since the arguments were captured, any vars 
// that were sent in will be unique to the function.

function addListenerWithArgs(elem, evt, func, vars){
    var f = function(ff, vv){
            return (function (){
                ff(vv);
            });
    }(func, vars);

    elem.addEventListener(evt, f);

    return f;
}

// Usage:

function doSomething(withThis){
    console.log("withThis", withThis);
}

// Capture the function so we can remove it later.
var storeFunc = addListenerWithArgs(someElem, "click", doSomething, "foo");

// To remove the listener, use the normal routine:
someElem.removeEventListener("click", storeFunc);
1
  • This answer is from '15 but it's exactly what I needed to handle this issue with using a useRef hook. If you're using a ref hook and needed a listener for it that you can clean up on component unmounting, this is it. The 4th arg to storeFunc should be your ref variable. Put your listener removal in a useEffect like this and you're good to go: useEffect(() => { return () => { window.removeEventListener('scroll', storeFunc, false); } }, [storeFunc])
    – Rob B
    Sep 5, 2019 at 14:48
2

There is a special variable inside all functions: arguments. You can pass your parameters as anonymous parameters and access them (by order) through the arguments variable.

Example:

var someVar = some_other_function();
someObj.addEventListener("click", function(someVar){
    some_function(arguments[0]);
}, false);
1
  • Hmm... What's the reason for the downvote? If it was not what you where looking for, then please explain more clearly what you mean (I know that the question has been answered already). But isn't my code answering what you asked for? The special variable "arguments" gives you access to all parameters inside a function.
    – StanE
    Mar 2, 2015 at 23:07
2

I was stuck in this as I was using it in a loop for finding elements and adding listner to it. If you're using it in a loop, then this will work perfectly

for (var i = 0; i < states_array.length; i++) {
     var link = document.getElementById('apply_'+states_array[i].state_id);
     link.my_id = i;
     link.addEventListener('click', function(e) {   
        alert(e.target.my_id);        
        some_function(states_array[e.target.my_id].css_url);
     });
}
2

Since your event listener is 'click', you can:

someObj.setAttribute("onclick", "function(parameter)");
2

I suggest you to do something like that:

var someVar = some_other_function();
someObj.addEventListener("click", (event, param1 = someVar) => {
    some_function(param1);
}, false);
1
  • That’s not a very clean way. This is reminiscent of code golfing. It’s also not future-proof: what if the DOM specification extends addEventListener in the future to call the event listener with a second argument? Then this will stop working. Feb 3, 2022 at 10:50
2

Another workaround is by Using data attributes

function func(){
    console.log(this.dataset.someVar);
    div.removeEventListener("click", func);
}
    
var div = document.getElementById("some-div");
div.setAttribute("data-some-var", "hello");
div.addEventListener("click", func);

jsfiddle

1
  • 1
    Fits the way I code things in JS. Additionally, if required, even the data attribute (dataset) parameter can be changed, or removed, when required. Nov 30, 2023 at 23:22
2

In case you want to remove the event-listener later, creating a reference to a currying function is a good alternative.

In the code below, I will illustrate what I mean.

// This is the curry function. We return a new function with the signature of what the click-listener expects
const handleClick = (foo, bar) => (clickEvent) => {
  console.log('we get our custom input', foo, bar);
  console.log('we get the click event too', clickEvent);
}

// We need to store a reference to the listener, making sure we are removing the correct reference later
const myListener = handleClick('foo', 'bar'); // Remember that we now return the actual event-handler


const btn = document.getElementById('btn'); // find the element to attach the listener to
btn.addEventListener('click', myListener);

// remove the event listener like this by using our reference
btn.removeEventListener('click', myListener);

Here's a working example on CodePen

1

Also try these (IE8 + Chrome. I dont know for FF):

function addEvent(obj, type, fn) {
    eval('obj.on'+type+'=fn');
}

function removeEvent(obj, type) {
    eval('obj.on'+type+'=null');
}

// Use :

function someFunction (someArg) {alert(someArg);}

var object=document.getElementById('somObject_id') ;
var someArg="Hi there !";
var func=function(){someFunction (someArg)};

// mouseover is inactive
addEvent (object, 'mouseover', func);
// mouseover is now active
addEvent (object, 'mouseover');
// mouseover is inactive

Hope there is no typos :-)

1
  • How hard would it be to put a complete answer? Should i test this on FF? Well, I wont bother ...
    – StefanNch
    May 30, 2013 at 10:24
1

The following answer is correct but the below code is not working in IE8 if suppose you compressed the js file using yuicompressor. (In fact,still most of the US peoples using IE8)

var someVar; 
someVar = some_other_function();
alert(someVar);
someObj.addEventListener("click",
                         function(){
                          some_function(someVar);
                         },
                         false);

So, we can fix the above issue as follows and it works fine in all browsers

var someVar, eventListnerFunc;
someVar = some_other_function();
eventListnerFunc = some_function(someVar);
someObj.addEventListener("click", eventListnerFunc, false);

Hope, it would be useful for some one who is compressing the js file in production environment.

Good Luck!!

1
    var EV = {
        ev: '',
        fn: '',
        elem: '',
        add: function () {
            this.elem.addEventListener(this.ev, this.fn, false);
        }
    };

    function cons() {
        console.log('some what');
    }

    EV.ev = 'click';
    EV.fn = cons;
    EV.elem = document.getElementById('body');
    EV.add();

//If you want to add one more listener for load event then simply add this two lines of code:

    EV.ev = 'load';
    EV.add();
1

The following approach worked well for me. Modified from here.

function callback(theVar) {
  return function() {
    theVar();
  }
}

function some_other_function() {
  document.body.innerHTML += "made it.";
}

var someVar = some_other_function;
document.getElementById('button').addEventListener('click', callback(someVar));
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <body>
    <button type="button" id="button">Click Me!</button>
  </body>
</html>

1

The PERFECT SOLUTION for this is to use Closures like this:

function makeSizer(size) {
  return function () {
    document.body.style.fontSize = `${size}px`;
  };
}

//pass parameters here and keep the reference in variables:
const size12 = makeSizer(12);
const size24 = makeSizer(24);
const size36 = makeSizer(36);

document.getElementById('size-12').addEventListener("click", size12);
document.getElementById('size-24').addEventListener("click", size24);
document.getElementById('size-36').addEventListener("click", size36);

document.getElementById('remove-12').addEventListener("click", ()=>{
    document.getElementById('size-12').removeEventListener("click", size12);
  alert("Now click on 'size 12' button and you will see that there is no event listener any more");
});
test<br/>
<button id="size-12">
size 12
</button>

<button id="size-24">
size 24
</button>

<button id="size-36">
size 36
</button>

<button id="remove-12">
remove 12
</button>

So basically you wrap a function inside another function and assign that to a variable that you can register as an event listener, but also unregister as well!

0

The following code worked fine for me (firefox):

for (var i=0; i<3; i++) {
   element = new ...   // create your element
   element.counter = i;
   element.addEventListener('click', function(e){
        console.log(this.counter);
        ...            // another code with this element
   }, false);
}

Output:

0
1
2
1
  • What in the world is this? Jul 6, 2015 at 12:27

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