14

From two integers (1, 5) one can create a range in the following way

1:5

[1] 1 2 3 4 5

How can you make a range of dates if you are give two dates ("2014-09-04 JST", "2014-09-11 JST")

The output must be

[1] ("2014-09-04 JST", "2014-09-05 JST", "2014-09-06 JST", "2014-09-07 JST", "2014-09-08 JST")

  • 1
    Well, if you have a timezone, then they are not Dates but rather datetimes. There are seq-methods for either class. – 42- Sep 5 '14 at 0:43
  • Can you answer this question for date + timezone? – sjdh Sep 5 '14 at 0:49
  • @sjdh See comment to jalapic answer. – 42- Sep 5 '14 at 0:54
  • @sjdh - would be great if you could give an answer a tick to close the question. thanks. – jalapic Oct 1 '14 at 13:20
  • Good solutions here, too: stackoverflow.com/questions/14450384/… – DirtStats Feb 12 at 22:16
24

Does this help?

seq(as.Date("2014/09/04"), by = "day", length.out = 5)
# [1] "2014-09-04" "2014-09-05" "2014-09-06" "2014-09-07" "2014-09-08"

edit: adding in something about timezones

this works for my current timezone

seq(c(ISOdate(2014,4,9)), by = "DSTday", length.out = 5) 
#[1] "2014-04-09 08:00:00 EDT" "2014-04-10 08:00:00 EDT" "2014-04-11 08:00:00 EDT" "2014-04-12 08:00:00 EDT"
#[5] "2014-04-13 08:00:00 EDT"

edit2:

OlsonNames()  # I used this to find out what to write for the JST tz - it's "Japan"

x <- as.POSIXct("2014-09-04 23:59:59", tz="Japan")
format(seq(x, by="day", length.out=5), "%Y-%m-%d %Z")

# [1] "2014-09-04 JST" "2014-09-05 JST" "2014-09-06 JST" "2014-09-07 JST" "2014-09-08 JST"
  • No timezones. eh? – 42- Sep 5 '14 at 0:43
  • How about format( seq(c(ISOdate(2014,4,9)), by = "DSTday", length.out = 5), "%Y-%m-%d %Z") – 42- Sep 5 '14 at 0:54
  • 1
    If I give you these two dates ("2014-09-04 JST", "2014-09-11 JST") can you construct a sequence too? With result in JST? (In case you are curious, JST stands for Japanese Standard Time) – sjdh Sep 5 '14 at 1:03
  • Not sure why this was accepted. It doesn't answer the question. "How can you make a range of dates if you are give (sic) two dates?" – thelatemail Aug 22 '17 at 1:25
13

To get a sequence of dates ( days, weeks,.. ) using only start and end dates you can use:

seq(as.Date("2014/1/1"), as.Date("2014/1/10"), "days”)

[1] "2014-01-01" "2014-01-02" "2014-01-03" "2014-01-04" "2014-01-05" "2014-01-06" "2014-01-07"
[8] "2014-01-08" "2014-01-09" "2014-01-10”
0

Here's an answer, admittedly worse than @jalapic's, that doesn't use seq and instead uses a for loop:

date1 <- "2014-09-04"
date2 <- "2014-09-11"
dif <- as.numeric(abs(as.Date(date1) - as.Date(date2)))
dates <- vector()
for (i in 1:dif) {
  date <- (as.Date(date1) + i)
  dates <- append(dates, date)
}
# [1] "2014-09-05" "2014-09-06" "2014-09-07" "2014-09-08" "2014-09-09" "2014-09-10" "2014-09-11
  • 1
    There's no reason to use a loop for this. – nrussell Sep 5 '14 at 0:53
0

here's a shot though the timezone JST isn't recognized by my system

d1<-ISOdate(year=2014,month=9,day=4,tz="GMT")
seq(from=d1,by="day",length.out=5)
[1] "2014-09-04 12:00:00 GMT" "2014-09-05 12:00:00 GMT" "2014-09-06 12:00:00 GMT" "2014-09-07 12:00:00 GMT" "2014-09-08 12:00:00 GMT"

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