75

I would like to open a local file, and return a io.Reader. The reason is that I need to feed a io.Reader to a library I am using, like:

func read(r io.Reader) (results []string) {

}
  • 1
    Probably worth spending some time browsing around golang.org/pkg and, for the kind of thing it sounds like you're doing, the os, io, io/ioutil, and bufio. – twotwotwo Sep 5 '14 at 3:31
95

os.Open returns an io.Reader

http://play.golang.org/p/BskGT09kxL

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "os"
)

var _ io.Reader = (*os.File)(nil)

func main() {
    fmt.Println("Hello, playground")
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • 23
    Heh, love the trick for showing that (*os.File) is an io.Reader without being able to Open files from the Playground. – twotwotwo Sep 5 '14 at 5:15
  • @twotwotwo what exactly does that hack do. I am assuming syntacticly it's saying a file of nothing so it never trys to open anything. – mschuett Feb 20 '15 at 6:37
  • 7
    @mschuett More or less: it's a nil pointer of the right type to point to an os.File. (In this case, you can't really do anything through it.) And the var _ io.Reader = (*os.File)(nil) assignment makes the compiler check that *os.File is an io.Reader (or else the assignment wouldn't be valid). If you go to the Playground and change *os.File to *os.Process you'll see the error it generates for things that don't satisfy the interface. – twotwotwo Feb 20 '15 at 6:55
  • 2
    @fabrizioM where exactly in the documentation it says that *os.File implements a Reader. Otherwise, without this answer how you could figure out yourself from just reading an official doc? Ok, I see that func (f *File) Read(b []byte) (n int, err error), the same as in Reader. – Aliaksandr Kazlou Aug 18 '15 at 14:36
37

Use os.Open():

func Open(name string) (file *File, err error)

Open opens the named file for reading. If successful, methods on the returned file can be used for reading; the associated file descriptor has mode O_RDONLY. If there is an error, it will be of type *PathError.

The returned value of type *os.File implements the io.Reader interface.

|improve this answer|||||
22

The type *os.File implements the io.Reader interface, so you can return the file as a Reader. But I recommend you to use the bufio package if you have intentions of read big files, something like this:

file, err := os.Open("path/file.ext")
// if err != nil { ... }

return bufio.NewReader(file)
|improve this answer|||||
  • 4
    Could you please elaborate on why you recommend bufio for large files? – Ciro Costa May 10 '17 at 21:34
  • 1
    @CiroCosta if you have a huge file of Gbs you don't want to read it completely on memory, so for those cases we should use a buffer – Yandry Pozo Aug 20 '17 at 17:09
  • go's runtime uses buffers in sensible situations e.g. io.Copy will reuse underlying buffers if their interface is available - otherwise it will create an internal buffer – colminator Feb 2 '19 at 21:46
  • 1
    Thanks for path/file.ext. No other answer spelled out what os.File was. – Azurespot Aug 3 '19 at 0:41
2

Here is an example where we open a text file and create an io.Reader from the returned *os.File instance f

package main

import (
    "io"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    f, err := os.Open("somefile.txt")
    if err != nil {
        panic(err)
    }
    defer f.Close()

    var r io.Reader
    r = f
}
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